Quantcast

Input on stallion

Miniature Horse Talk Forums

Help Support Miniature Horse Talk Forums:

VernB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2004
Messages
153
Reaction score
0
Location
Utah
This is a stallion I bought not long ago, he was 2 months from turning 3. Sorry I dont have better pics but maybe you can see through that remaining hair. Please let me know what you think of him. I'm not very good at deciding what is a good stallion. Do you think he is sh
ow quality? How is his build considering a 3yo. lets hear your opinions.
 

Ashley

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
5,529
Reaction score
72
All I can say is that he needs more weight and more muscle in the rump and shoulder.
 

crponies

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
2,978
Reaction score
0
Location
central CA
He has a pretty head. His conformation would be easier to judge if he was standing with his hind feet back a little more and his neck not up quite so high. I like his color and his nice full tail too.
 

luvmycritters

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2004
Messages
1,220
Reaction score
0
Location
Wi.
I agree, get some more weight on him, get him set up a little better and then take some more pics. Pretty coloring on him!
 

VernB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2004
Messages
153
Reaction score
0
Location
Utah
I agree He needs more weight and muscle. These pics were taken 3 days after I got him, I've had him for 2 mo and he is looking a lot better.
 

lyn_j

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
6,159
Reaction score
1
[SIZE=14pt]Are you really asking for a true critique?? Can I just say that in my opinion he is NOT stallion material. If you want the details of why I say that let me know. I have gotten some pretty nasty emails for stating my opinions that are not favorable but I will if you say that I should. IF you would rather have a pm thats ok too.Added... Even with more wt I dont see him as show quality either.[/SIZE]

Lyn
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Sunraye Miniatures

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2004
Messages
309
Reaction score
0
I agree with Lyn I don't see him as stallion material. Of course it could be the lack of conditioning and weight loss can play a huge factor.
 
F

fantacsix

Guest
Where are you from? This horse looks kinda like one I went to look at last year. Allison
 

rabbitsfizz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2003
Messages
10,937
Reaction score
384
Location
England
No, sorry, he is NOT stallion material. There are so many good colts around you can afford to be choosy. Geld him, he looks as if he has a nice nature, some child would adore him.
 

VernB

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2004
Messages
153
Reaction score
0
Location
Utah
I Bought him because he is AMHA out of a national top ten winner, Rowdy bred. His Dam is very well built. And yes he came to me very thin with a potbelli but I will give him a chance. What do you see that is not stallion quality? I will not get upset,and If I do I'll keep it to myself. I'm no proffesional. He's alot better looking than my previous stallion that I had gelded because he threw a dwarf. Can two very nice parent qualified minis produce a not good quality foal.
 

capall beag

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 20, 2005
Messages
2,137
Reaction score
0
Location
York Beach, Maine originally from Ireland!
I wouldn't dare critique him because I am not qualified to!

BUT in answer to your Q "Can two good quality horses produce something less than good, DEFINATELY YES!! I could show you examples of POOR quality horses out of some of the best quality horses. Sometimes the combination of the two is off and their offspring can inheret their faults because NO horse is perfect!!

This answer is NOT directed at your stallion just an answer to you Q.
 

susanne

dB
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
5,285
Reaction score
313
Location
To your left
Vern,

As much as I believe in gelding, I have to say: you can always cut them off, but you can't glue them back on. So if you feel he has potential, then get him to a good weight and condition himk groom him to the nines, and then look at him objectively (and ask at that time for opinions). I've sen some pretty scraggly "befores" who turned into beautiful "afters," but we don't often see the ugly ducklings that grow up to be ugly ducks...

Another thing to keep in mind, and this was critical in my decision to geld: do you have mares, and are they a complementary match for him? Is he special enough that others would want to send their mares to you, and do you have the facilities and the ability to take mares in?

Keep an open mind, and be prepared to geld him if he is anything less than your ideal, but there is no need to rush, so long as you have the situation to keep him separated from mares or other stallions. Don't look at it as if you're cheating him out of something; instead, you are giving him a chance to be a social animal and a devoted companion to you.
 

rabbitsfizz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2003
Messages
10,937
Reaction score
384
Location
England
All that is wrong with him- goose rump, low set tail , tied in neck, upside down neck, acceptable but not brilliant shoulder- will go away when he is conditioned properly, but still be there in his genes as they are conformation faults. I do not see him as a stallion because I have gelded far, far better colts. It is as simple as that. He is far too heavy for my breeding plan and, before people start shouting about there being a place for animals like this, Yes, there is, and in this country it is in the Shetland Pony Stud Book Society- which is why I do not think the "heavies" have a place in Miniature Horse breeding any more
Sorry Vern, I think he's very pretty, just does not fill my eye.
 

Four__Aces

Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2002
Messages
9
Reaction score
0
I don't think this horse is stallion quality, even if you get him fat and shiney, the conformation faults are still there and more than likely will be passed on.

Even with a good pedigree that is certainly not a promise of a top level horse, just a basis for consistancy of certain traits that will hopefully be passed on.

I think a stallion really has to grab you and scream quality, and this horse just doesnt. Of course, no horse is perfect, but that is no excuse for not trying to breed the best horses which requires a quality combination to begin with.

You would probably better off to geld him, pick your best mare and sent her to a top quality outside stallion that complements her and hope for the best. If you are ultimately after a show horse it is probably a better idea to purchase the exact horse you want, rather than trying to breed it which is not only a combination of planning and money but also lots of luck
Just MO
 

lyn_j

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
6,159
Reaction score
1
[SIZE=14pt] My suggestion would be to review the pictures of the horses that people are posting as winning in the ring. Look even at the horses in my avitar as they have all been champions except the weanling pinto. These will be your competition. Hold your horse up next to the ones being shown by Erica and others and see how he compares.This is what I see that weight wont help. He has a large common head although nicely marked it looks too big for the rest of him. He has a poorly tied in low set neck that is also ewe necked, that upside down neck that Jane was talking bout. He has a fair shoulder , good front legs, long backed, goose rumped will only be accentuated by wt on his rear, low tail set, and appears somewhat cow hocked. He is also heavier boned than most stallions showing today.He is in my opinion not even gelding show quality and I would expect that a stallion prospect be AT LEAST that. It is comon for two top show quality individuals to produce some pet quality foals no matter what pedigree it has. I have purchased weanlings from top lines that were later sold as pets because they didnt pan out. Just because daddy or mommy was a national champion doesnt mean they will produce it consistantly. They can if they are line bred and type is set but out of 10 foals maybe 2 or 3 will make the cut. Sorry to say that as someone who breeds and shows all I see here is a pet. Love him and add wt. for him and keep him happy.[/SIZE]

Lyn
 
Last edited by a moderator:

alphahorses

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2005
Messages
464
Reaction score
0
Location
OH
Vern, I applaud you for seeking an honest objective opinion about your colt. I wish more people would do the same before selecting a stallion


I think you will be able to answer the question for yourself in time ... give him the time and love it takes to get him into really good shape, then take a hard look at him and if he doesn't just absolutely WOW you,
he's not the stallion for you.


Good luck - let us see how he looks when you get him conditioned.
 
L

Lisa-Ruff N Tuff Minis

Guest
ok well first off any horse can have a place in the show ring just depends on what you want to do. Not every horse is halter material, and some are not driving material but.. there are other things as well such as driving obstacle, in hand obstacle, hunters, jumpers, showmanship that are more about training then conformation .

Now that said I personally wouldnt consider your horse for breeding but that is just me. A stallion should really be at the top 10 percent of breed. Should be a horse that everyone stops and says WOW, a horse that others can see as well as the owner looks alot like the horses in the Journal or World mag winning(doesnt mean you have to show)

It is very hard for us to be objective about the horses that we love.

Pedigree doesnt equal quality if it were as easy as breeding to top horses to get a top horse... we would all have top horses
 

Frankie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2003
Messages
4,430
Reaction score
36
Location
Muncie, Indiana
ok well first off any horse can have a place in the show ring just depends on what you want to do. Not every horse is halter material, and some are not driving material but.. there are other things as well such as driving obstacle, in hand obstacle, hunters, jumpers, showmanship that are more about training then conformation


I firmly believe it is too hard to give a "judges opinion" on how this horse will do.

For one, they can not provide the perfect picture for us to "judge" on. For another, we are not judges.

What Lisa said is very true! Last year I was at 2 different shows where the same horse won jumping. Not a pretty horse for halter, but MAN could this guy perform. Showing can be fun. We all excel at different things, find what it is your horse excels at.

Or, do what Ginny did! Training, work, love and conditioning.

Now honestly to all of you. If you looked at Ginny's post on Willy and how far he has come this past year, if you had looked at the pictures from his registration, I am willing to bet you would have told Ginny the same as you are saying here. He is not stallion material, BUT if you saw him now, YOU WOULD BE STANDING IN LINE TO PURCHASE A BREEDING BY HIM!!!!!!

Good luck, enjoy your boy!
 

mininik

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
2,846
Reaction score
0
Location
PNW
"For another, we are not judges."

Judges are people with an opinion. Some are better than others. Personally, I would trust the opinion of many here over certain carded "judges."

In regard to the horse presented for critiquing, I would agree with those who said he is not stallion material. Even so, I bet he would make a really fun gelding.
 

Latest posts

Top