Stubborn horse

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Bullseye

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I am still a "newbie" in the Miniature Pony world. I have a shetland (Bullseye) and lately I've been having troubles with him. The biggest one is Biting. I have tried over 100 times just twisting his lip when he nips, but he seems to ignore it. Now He is mouth shy and its difficult to handle his mouth. even when I come up to him, he seems to think that nipping is a greeting. I'm not sure what to do anymore. I'm also having troubles with backing up. He'd rather bend his neck in half than back up. Show season starts soon, is there something im missing? He comes to me easily, and is easy to get the halter on, he just doesn't cooperate all the time.

Please help.
 

chandab

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Is he still a colt or has he been gelded?

And, I wonder if the lip twisting isn't seen as biting by him, so he's trying to bite you first. so perhaps a different tactic to get him to stop is needed.
 

muffntuf

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Please state how old he is. If it was a yearling or two year old - I would be popping his chest and yelling at him like a Dam or mare would, letting him know he isn't allowed to do the biting thing. You don't state if he is by himself either - if he is young, he is missing a playmate and is trying to do the same thing, playing with his mouth - same remedy - pop him really hard and yell at him making him recoil.

Take care not to feed treats just because. The only time they should get a treat is after they do a good job at whatever training you are doing.

So tell us some more, tell us what you are trying to do, etc. Helps us out.
 

Norah

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when my kids act up it means i have been too" lovie dovie" with them . when they pushme past my limit I tell them OK enough is enough , and have to become very assertive with them . round penning , with direction changes helps redefine who is boss, and if i want to pick a hoof up or get something over a head , darnit there going to have to just deal with it . sometimes i feel like holding that hoof is like I am realing in a swordfish...I dont let go , maybe reposition so its not at an awkward place for the horse. maybe do some posative reinforcement to but past his "stuck" place. ask him to do something very easy , and reward him for doing it right. This will help him understand what is right and what is wrong . to back up , have you tried turning your body around , so your facing his back end and asking him to back with a light pressure on his rope halter , use your hand and foot movement to walk him backwards... Look for a natural horsemanship trainer to help you with making your body language very clear , so there is no confusion. I agree 100% with the 2 replys above . let us know how it goes
 

Marsha Cassada

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When asking to back, a trainer showed me some techniques. Have a whip, of course, for cueing. The force of your BEING must make him back. Make yourself large and forceful. Shout if you have to. wave your arms. He must back away from you because you are dominant. One step back is enough--praise!! Good pony!! Ask to back again and be dominant. One step is enough at a time--praise!! Once he understands what you are asking, he will respond to a simple "back" or even your movement toward him in a dominant manner. He is not respecting you.

He must learn to back straightly, and that is what your whip cue is for. The whip is to cue the front shoulder to "steer" him.

As for biting, I have a gelding that I've never been able to cure. He is very mouthy about everything. He does not bite meanly, but as a brat. We've done so much pinching/smacking/yelling that in some situations (such as at hoof cleaning time) I just look at him and say "don't even think of it", and he minds his manners. But it is almost as though he can't help himself. I think it is very important to cure this at a young age--my boy was a 5 year old stallion when I got him and already was doing it. I've had him 10 years.

Interestingly, when we go to nursing homes and schools, do parades and petting "zoos", he has never nipped anyone. Crowds of children around him, petting and stroking, and he has never nipped. Old folks handling him, he never has nipped.
 

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