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Shade Trees for Pasture

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nootka

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Not 100% sure about toxicity, but we have a few alder trees that we have in our pasture for shade, also some evergreens, but they were there when we moved here.

Alders grow quickly, which is both good and bad, but there are always a few young ones to replace the bigger ones we take out.

We have some that were twigs ten years ago, they are like thirty feet tall, now.

We will probably have to cut some out in a few years, though, because once they get too big, they start to rot inside and then fall over.

Wish I had more ideas for you!

Liz M.
 

susanne

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We've had a terrible time with alder trees snapping off at about 12 feet off the ground...each has fallen frighteningly close to the corral, so we're taking out all that are too close.

I like fir trees, but of course they don't grow terribly fast, and the small ones seem to serve as "boy brushes"...
 

Sandyboy1

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Not too long ago on here, willows, ash trees, and honeylocust trees were mentioned as being on the safe list for horses. Globe willows will thrive in just about any conditions. They grow fast and provide a lot of shade.

Pam
 

Shari

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Second the Willow,, then Aspen, Leland cypress all grow pretty fast. Redwood works well too.

But you will have to protect them from the horses until the trees get big enough.

In the mini pasture I have full grown Doug fir. In the main patures I have Alder,, (like Susanne said is a messy tree, really annoying and a lot of work) Maple, Cedar & Doug Fir.

All would be OK.
 

Tapestry Minis

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Thanks you guys for the info. Have any of you heard how Fruitless Mulberry trees do up here in the North West? My mom has one in her back yard but she lives in CA so not sure how it would do with the winters here. Makes a great shade tree though.
 

liltnt

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just looked up a fruitless mulberry and it wouldnt do well in your area, Top cold in the winter unless it doesnt get beloww say 20 to 30 degrees.
 

susanne

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Fruitless mulberry (Morus alba) is listed as Sunset zone 7, which covers most of western Oregon and Washington, but probably not Idaho nor east of the Cascades. However, microclimates vary, and if the location is sheltered it may work for you. Check to see if any regional nurseries (do an internet search) carry it...it will be hardier if grown nearby.
 
S

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You are in Idaho and I'm not sure if they grow in your area, but I was thinking a maple tree (not the red kind), they grow fast and we have a few on our property.

They provide lots of shade.
 

Tapestry Minis

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I had Maple in mind but wanted to make sure it would harm the horses if they ate the leaves and such. Maple sounds like the best bet and I like them. I was going to stay away from the pine trees because of the sap, needles, & pitch. Thank you everyone for your suggestions and info!
 
S

small herd

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The big leaf maples we have do not hurt the horses, but I do try and rake up most of the leaves that fall .
 

keeperofthehorses

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We really like Norway Maples (not the Reds). They are tough, horse-safe, and lovely (beautiful gold in the fall). They do have seeds, though we've not had a problem with sprouts. Male (seedless) ash, hybrid poplars (not the spindly ditch bank ones), European Hornbeams, and Lindens (both the large-leaf and the small leaf) are some other favorites. All are hardy, and all except the ash and the poplars are fairly disease and insect resistant. London Planetrees are great, if you don't mind the mess (little prickly seedballs, great for keeping kitties out of flower beds.) The native elms that grow wild around here are good too, but they seed and sprout like wildfire. Nursery grown cultivars of the Silver Maple are beautiful, hardy and fast growing, but may become brittle under snow and ice if not regularly pruned properly. Of all of these, our favorites are the Linden and the Norway Maple.

For evergreens around here, the Austrian pines, Colorado and Norway Spruce do quite well, but my critters seem to like munching on those more than any other trees. I'll admit, a pony with piney breath really isn't so bad...

Back when I owned and landscaping nursery, I wrote a pamphlet called "Landscaping for Livestock". I'll see if I can't round up an old copy and post it. If you'd like pictures of any of these trees, feel free to drop me an email.

Suzanne
 
S

small herd

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The big leaf maples we have do not hurt the horses, but I do try and rake up most of the leaves that fall .
 

Tapestry Minis

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Hi Suzanne,

Wow! Thank you for all that info. Funny you mentioned the Norway Maple. I was searching around on the Better Homes & Gardens website and that is the Maple I liked
I'll drop you an e-mail about those others. Thanks again!
 

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