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Mare Has Too Much Milk...

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Mona

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I know this sounds strange, and I have never heard of, nor encountered this before over the years. I had a mare foal yesterday around 12:30am so he is now about 36 hours old. When he made his first attempts at nursing, his mother would squeal. I have seen that often in mares after the foal is born. as their udder/teats seem very tender while full of milk. Well, as I said, this colt is 36 hours old now, and his dam STILL squeals each and every time! She is milking like a holstein, and has such a full bag! This is a big colt too, so should be taking lots, but obviously not enough to relive the pressure!!

I thought about milking her out, but then that would only tell her to produce more. Any ideas? Will this result in mastitis? What, if anything should I be doing? I feel bad for her. Thanks in advance.
 

Ashley

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Is this a first time mare?

Honestly if she is letting him nurse I would worry bout it.

I have 2 mares that milk like a cow to. In fact there bags are so big they kinda stick out between the back of there legs. I have never had an issue and just leave them be.
 

Genie

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I am not an expert but my first thought would be to cut back on any rich food the mare might be getting.

Just feed hay and maybe something like a bit of "Horse Krunch" which aids digestion.

Also a cold pack may reduce the pain. If I milked anything to relieve the pressure it would be very little.
 

Magic

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I had this happen with a maiden mare this year too. My mare would get so sore that she wasn't letting the foal nurse (not knowing that it would just make things worse for her!) I was so glad I was watching her on the camera monitor. I think that sometimes the maidens take a while to regulate their milk output. I gave my mare some banamine, and was putting warm compresses on her bag to help relieve the pain, and of course holding her so the foal could nurse. She gradually felt better. I hope that your mare does too!
 

Mona

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Ashley, yes, you hit it all bang on! She IS a maiden mare, and yes, her bag is so full, the bag is round and sticking out behind her (like they often do BEFORE foaling when they get that big tight bag) but even her milk veins are very full and tight. Seems there is jjust no relief. The colt is a big colt, so getting lots to eat, but really doesn't even put a dent in things. I would have thought she would stop producing as much, and settle in only to as much as the colt is taking.

Yes, she is letting him nurse, but it sounds so bad! LOL! She is not mean at all, just squeals really loud each time.

As for feed, she is just getting hay 2 x a day...an alfalfa mix, and also Omolene 200.
 

Ashley

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I had a maiden mare do this several years ago. Except I had to back her in a corner to let the foal nurse. After a day she let him nurse and after a few her bag was down to normal.

I personally wouldnt worry, just keep in eye on it for a few days. If you want you could take away her grain and that would help a bit.
 

SampleMM

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Mona,

I'd have her thyroid checked. When I had my first baby I had so much milk the hospital asked me if I wanted to sell it. This went on for months, tons of milk even though I was nursing my baby nonstop. My excess milk was a symptom of hypothyroidism.

Wishing you the best,

Debbie
 

Reble

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If she just squeals when he first latches on, that can be normal for some mares to make sure their foal latches on gently, and being he is a big colt, might be a little rough. Good Luck
 

Devon

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We had a maiden last year who also squealed when her foal was nursing for a few days she squirted milk when she walked; Maybe wait a few more days. She was perfectly normal 4-5 days after foaling
Foal got into the swing of things and so did she!


Good Luck!

Cant wait to see the new foal
 

Mona

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I just thought of something! I have noticed the colt at the water pail on several occassions, and with his muzzle in there, but I assumed because he is so young he was just being curious...maybe he has been filling up on water so not taking enough milk?? Could that be? I have just removed the water from the mare's stall, and will just offer her water several times throughout the day when I am in there. I would imagine by tomorrow at this time, the firmness of her bag will tell the story as to whether that was the problem or not!
 

Miniv

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I just thought of something! I have noticed the colt at the water pail on several occassions, and with his muzzle in there, but I assumed because he is so young he was just being curious...maybe he has been filling up on water so not taking enough milk?? Could that be? I have just removed the water from the mare's stall, and will just offer her water several times throughout the day when I am in there. I would imagine by tomorrow at this time, the firmness of her bag will tell the story as to whether that was the problem or not!
That is a VERY good possibility! He could be sipping just enough that it's effecting how much he nurses....... And Irish Hills had a good suggestion. Our lactating mares do drink twice as much water as other horses.
 
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