Fencing Issues

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Willow Flats

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We got a new neighbor next door last year who is new to rural living. She said she was going to replace the fencing along our property line and planned to replace it "partially with black iron fencing that would match the fencing for her pool and then some of that big square fencing so that the rabbits could still come through." I said what about field fencing and pointed to the no climb fencing we have on the other side of our property. She said no, I don't want that. I didn't offer to pay for half since this is not the fencing I want, especially since she was going down the rod iron fence road. She said she was using her own fence guy and would be coming on my property to cut trees and would let me know when. Basically she was telling my how things were going to be. The first week of May with no notice she had a bunch of guys rip all the fencing out but they didn't do any tree work. Over 500 feet of fencing gone. Yes, it was a little rusty, but it was fencing and kept my animals safe. Now my property is wide open. I have hot wire for grazing pasture, but no perimeter fencing on that side of our property now. My dry lot is fenced but a portion of it is panels and I have to close that part off at night so no dogs or coyotes can get in to the minis. We are now 2 1/2 months out now with no fencing and have asked her twice about her plan, but she is determined to wait on her fence guy friend who is going to "give her a deal." What kind of people move in and tear down the fencing of someone who has livestock and could care less?

So now we need to put up a fence! There is a ditch that runs the full length of that property line on our side. We use it as a lower trail and drive the length of the ditch with our horses. Because it's so flat around here it gives us a small hill to go down and back up on either end. We are going to put up a fence along the ditch side that is closest to our home and pasture so it won't be on the property line at all and therefore field fencing which is what we want and not shared. We will put gates on either end so we can still use the ditch for driving. My thought is that if she ever does put a fence up then I'll have an additional long grazing area...kind of a paddock paradise. Trying to make the best of the situation we find ourselves in. Anyway all this to say do you think a 4ft fence would be ok since it will be at the top of the ditch. Therefore it would really be taller because of the sides of the ditch adding to the height? I have 5 ft fencing for the dry lot and then only 4ft fencing around my chicken's yard, but that is sandwiched between my garden and the house close in where we don't get any wildlife.
 

Taz

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OMG what a nightmare. I've had some issues with neighbors. You might want to get a survey done so you can say exactly where the property line is so she can't pull anything. I know someone who had the property next to them sell and the new owner ripped out the fence line between their properties then put a new on up in the middle of their galloping track on that side. He claimed the fence was in the wrong place and was actually on his property so he moved it to the property line, after a lot of fighting it turned out he was wrong and had to move it back.
Anyway, getting back on track, I would think 4ft would be fine if it had the ditch to add the extra height. If she ever does put up a fence the paddock paradise idea is great and will be a bonus for you!!
 

Dragon Hill

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What a lovely neighbor. I, too, think 4 ft should be fine, but if you have any doubt you could run a hot wire across the top. Too bad you didn't have a bull or a few pigs, that would have got her attention if she found them in her yard.
 

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Sorry that you are going through this. My fence is about four foot (no climb wire) with a board running at the top and along the bottom to stabilize it so you should be ok.
Having a "solid" fencing saved my Peanut about a month ago. My neighbor had company who let their two huge dogs loose. I was in the paddock with Peanut and all of a sudden heard people screaming and a dog barking and growling and turned to see two dogs come full tilt towards my paddock at me and Peanut. They weren't fooling around, they were wildly excited, snarling and foaming at the mouth (for real) I grabbed Peanut and shoved him in the barn as the dog hit the fence. I am lucky the fence was there to stop it as that dog meant harm.
Neighbors :mad:
 

Willow Flats

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What a lovely neighbor. I, too, think 4 ft should be fine, but if you have any doubt you could run a hot wire across the top. Too bad you didn't have a bull or a few pigs, that would have got her attention if she found them in her yard.
Good because 4 ft will be cheaper too. This is the last thing we had planned to doing.
One of her dogs has been coming over and gets into one of the bays of composting manure and lays in it. Lol
 

Taz

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Good because 4 ft will be cheaper too. This is the last thing we had planned to doing.
One of her dogs has been coming over and gets into one of the bays of composting manure and lays in it. Lol
Hahaha! You might want to throw your hoof trimmings in there. My dog tends to get sick early in the morning, normally around 2am, after she's gotten into them. You might be a nicer person than I am though. 🤣
 

Marsha Cassada

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Good idea to find out who owns the fence that was removed. When we had our present property surveyed to purchase we asked the surveyor to put the fence on our side. If the neighbor wants to put in wrought iron with pointy tops, I would talk to them seriously about liability.

We had a neighbor with large boer goats. Regular fencing doesn't keep them out. The ram came over one day and chased my little hroses. It sounds funny but it wasn't. My husband had to shoot him with rat shot to make him go home. Did that neighbor offer to repair the fencing broken by frantic horses and wild ram??
I would not tolerate neighbor dogs coming in to lie in my compost. I would shoot those dogs with pellet or bb. If that didn't work, they would get rat shot. If the neighbor doesn't like it, let him keep his dogs at home.

4 feet sounds perfectly adequate.
 

Cayuse

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Marsha has a good point about who owned the prior fence etc. It made something come to mind for me. You might want to check zoning laws, some places have "set back" ordinances. Neighbor may have to "set back" the fence so many feet from the property line. She may be encroaching on your property (intentionally or not, who knows) and if she is making herself at home on your property then there is the "squatters rights" thing to worry about.
 

Willow Flats

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Good idea to find out who owns the fence that was removed. When we had our present property surveyed to purchase we asked the surveyor to put the fence on our side. If the neighbor wants to put in wrought iron with pointy tops, I would talk to them seriously about liability.

We had a neighbor with large boer goats. Regular fencing doesn't keep them out. The ram came over one day and chased my little hroses. It sounds funny but it wasn't. My husband had to shoot him with rat shot to make him go home. Did that neighbor offer to repair the fencing broken by frantic horses and wild ram??
I would not tolerate neighbor dogs coming in to lie in my compost. I would shoot those dogs with pellet or bb. If that didn't work, they would get rat shot. If the neighbor doesn't like it, let him keep his dogs at home.

4 feet sounds perfectly adequate.
I learn more things on this forum! Marsha, I have been saying "wrought iron" fence wrong my entire life! lol I've been pronouncing it just as I incorrectly spelled it. So thank you!☺ She fortunately doesn't have the pointy kind and I think she has figured out how expensive it will be. She said she liked the fencing we have in the front of our home (that is only stained wooden posts with two rails and wire in between) and said that would cost too much. These are city people who are learning everything the hard way.
 

Willow Flats

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Marsha has a good point about who owned the prior fence etc. It made something come to mind for me. You might want to check zoning laws, some places have "set back" ordinances. Neighbor may have to "set back" the fence so many feet from the property line. She may be encroaching on your property (intentionally or not, who knows) and if she is making herself at home on your property then there is the "squatters rights" thing to worry about.
Before we lived here, we lived in the Santa Cruz mountains in a private community of 25 homes. We all owned our own parcels on 177 shared acres of parkland. It was so beautiful with hiking trails and a river with a beach and swimming hole with the rope swing. The smell of the redwoods was the best! Two households got in an argument. Guy #1 said the new huge deck that guy #2 built had a corner of that deck on his property. Lawyers were hired and a survey done. Turned out that guy #1's entire home wasn't even built on his own parcel but was actually located on the communities shared land. He didn't build this home but purchased it and remodeled it. All the homes were built in the 40's there. It turned into a huge mess because mature redwood trees had been cut down and planting some saplings wasn't agreeable to people. The guy's wife left him and he couldn't sell his home because it wasn't on his land. I thought we should all sell it to him for a dollar and be done with it. The whole thing drug out and still wasn't resolved when we moved here. Yep, surveys are really important!!!
 

Pitter Patter

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What a lovely neighbor. I, too, think 4 ft should be fine, but if you have any doubt you could run a hot wire across the top. Too bad you didn't have a bull or a few pigs, that would have got her attention if she found them in her yard.
I have a 300 lb goat she can borrow! That fence would be back up in no time! Neighbors can be helpful or a nuisance...I have a trespassing neighbor who doesn't think our signs pertain to him. He said not to worry, he will let me know when the ponies have their little ones...how sweet...NOT!!--But he is scared of my goat!
 

Pitter Patter

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Good idea to find out who owns the fence that was removed. When we had our present property surveyed to purchase we asked the surveyor to put the fence on our side. If the neighbor wants to put in wrought iron with pointy tops, I would talk to them seriously about liability.

We had a neighbor with large boer goats. Regular fencing doesn't keep them out. The ram came over one day and chased my little hroses. It sounds funny but it wasn't. My husband had to shoot him with rat shot to make him go home. Did that neighbor offer to repair the fencing broken by frantic horses and wild ram??
I would not tolerate neighbor dogs coming in to lie in my compost. I would shoot those dogs with pellet or bb. If that didn't work, they would get rat shot. If the neighbor doesn't like it, let him keep his dogs at home.

4 feet sounds perfectly adequate.
Having a large goat myself I can tell you a garden hose and nozzle with cold water is the best defense, believe it or not! They absolutely HATE water. When mine gets to nasty with my llamas, they spit at him and he acts like he was the wicked witch melting in the Wizard of Oz! Before we got a fence that (mostly) keeps him in, I kept a little spray bottle with water in it when he got into my garden or chickens looking for anything to eat. He is now behind electric fence, but doesn't even always respect that. Goats are good at determining if the risk of injury or pain is worth whatever is on the other side, and it usually is. Also, 4 feet is probably good. My fence is about 6 feet with seven strands of electric wire. I know that's not great for the minis, but we have so many predators (dogs and people included). So far it has kept away coyotes that stand across the road and howl. When they sound dangerously close, I take a dog with me and go sit with the animals.
 
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Marsha Cassada

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Yes, I had forgotten about goats and water. But in the heat of a moment, chasing him down with a water bottle or dragging a water hose 1/4 mile wasn't an option. But that is sure a funny picture, using a water bottle to keep him out of the garden!
 

MajorClementine

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In Utah you can't tear out a fence that is between two properties without having a survey to prove the entire fence is on the property of the person tearing it out. Otherwise both parties need to agree OR the party wanting to replace the fence has to put up the new fence along their side of the old fence and then remove the old fence after.

So I say yes to 4' fence and, it's a pain, but putting a field fence inside the property line will keep this from happening again. It's amazing to me how people move in and start changing things like they own the world. I live in, what used to be, as very small very rural dairy community. After we hosted some events of the Winter Olympics in 2002 the secret was out and now the valley is packed with multi-million dollar homes and we have all manner of property line/livestock issues on a regular basis. I feel your pain.
 

Holly Chisholm

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Wow! I'm so sorry you are having neighbor like that. My neighbor put up iron pipe with no climb on our boundary; then we both put up a hot wire about three feet away from the fence. He has a stallion, and this arrangement works quite well. But in your situation, it sounds like your neighbor cares more about looks than animal safety. :(
 

Marsha Cassada

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I learn more things on this forum! Marsha, I have been saying "wrought iron" fence wrong my entire life! lol I've been pronouncing it just as I incorrectly spelled it. So thank you!☺ She fortunately doesn't have the pointy kind and I think she has figured out how expensive it will be. She said she liked the fencing we have in the front of our home (that is only stained wooden posts with two rails and wire in between) and said that would cost too much. These are city people who are learning everything the hard way.
I know what you mean about city people. We keep getting them as neighbors in this same property that changes hands. Some are humble and willing to learn. Some are arrogant and think they can do what they like "because they live in the country". Then they find out how hard living in the country is and move back to town.
 

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