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Tony

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I know from time to time people express concern about new born foal's legs. I know that many of you have seen the example of Twister who was the worst example that we have ever had, or should I say "best"? Here is one from this year, pictured the day he was born and one week later. We did not do anything to him but let him be a horse.



For any newcomers to the board I will share the "old standby composite".



Two years old.
 

StellaLenoir

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what an informative post. I have to say I think all the foals you have posted are adorable!
I drool over the shots you have shared of your farm and horses. What a wonderfull view to wake up to! I would love to see all the little horses out in those beautiful fields, just being horses! And seeing he improvement in this little guy will help many owners of foals that have leg issues. We have only had one baby, who thank God was healthy and normal. He is most likely the only foal we will ever have, but I really enjoy seeing everyone elses and learning so much from those who have lots of babys. Thank you!

Are you the tall gentleman in the pic? If so WOW!!! Your family is beautifull. Thanks again for sharing your experience and your great little horses!
 

Tony

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quote name='StellaLenoir' post='1005307' date='Apr 17 2008, 10:44 PM']

Are you the tall gentleman in the pic? If so WOW!!! Your family is beautifull. Thanks again for sharing your experience and your great little horses!


No that was the family of the buyer of Mr Twister at the time. He IS very tall. Loved taking pictures of our horses with him!!!

Here is our family minus our new grand daughter born last month. I'm the old guy in the back.

[
 
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StellaLenoir

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Well your family is still beautifull! I was just a bit shocked at that mans height, he must get that alot! LOL!

The lady in the front center looks sooooooo much like my older sister it is really strange! How much fun you all must have with the horses!
 

Brandi*

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That is so amazing!! Imagine if you hadn't given them a chance
I would never have thought they could straighten out
Beautiful horses
 

Jill

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Tony --

This is a great thread! The filly you emailed with me about (you gave me some good advice on tube feeding) had legs almost like your "old standby". BUT, I knew from this message board that was not a huge concern especially given our other initial concerns about her. She came around SO fast and within a few days was very up and straight (and thank God, alive and thriving). I didn't get any U'ed pictures of her but she's doing good now.

Thanks,

Jill

 

Songcatcher

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Thanks for posting Tony. I always enjoy your informative posts as well as the pictures of your beautiful foals. Its great to have someone on the forum with as much experience as you.
 
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Manyspots

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this is a v ery good post to share Tony. When you said you let the foal just be a horse did you have it out in a pasture full exercise or was it confined somewhat is a smaller area? I know with some leg issues it is recommended to limit a lot of exercise. Thanks for sharing these pics! Lavonne
 

Jill

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I do not have near the experience as Tony, but my filly pictured "up right" was nearly as bad as the worst one he posted and the vet had us keep her in the stall for one week, but she was nearly all the way okay on her legs w/in 3 days. My filly also had to have some plasma transfusions so there were additional reasons for her "stall rest".
 

Tony

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this is a v ery good post to share Tony. When you said you let the foal just be a horse did you have it out in a pasture full exercise or was it confined somewhat is a smaller area? I know with some leg issues it is recommended to limit a lot of exercise. Thanks for sharing these pics! Lavonne
They were out in the lot with other pairs. Never isolated in stalls.

I am glad that you appreciated it and if it helps only one person, it is time well spent. I had people telling me that I should put the one down.
 
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Laura

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[SIZE=12pt]Great post Tony. May people don't know how flexible these little guys can be at birth. Makes me wish I had taken some pics of Jammer when he was born~yikes~LOL Contracted foals can also show incredible improvement within days, with and without medical help.[/SIZE]
 

MBhorses

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great thread Tony,

Thanks so much for sharing. I ask this same question last year about our foal, you were very helpful.

Thanks again for all the great photos and information.

Tony we really would like to thank you for all your help.
 

HGFarm

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Very good pics for examples Tony. I have had a few over the years off and on that were born a little 'weeble wobbly' and it is amazing how quickly they straighten up once they have to use those legs and strengthen them!!
 

RJRMINIS

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Tony, Thanks for posting these pics, I know when we have a foal born that has lax tendons, or are not up on their hooves right away, or turned out my husband always makes the comment, it's legs are not straight and after seeing how much they can improve with time, I say just give them time! It is nice to be able to show him these pics! Thank you.
 

palsminihorses

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Tony,

I am so happy to see this post! We just had a foal born last night (4/17), and he is quite what I call, knock-kneed. I was thinking he would need to be kept stalled for a couple of days, but now I think I will let them out in a small pen tomorrow........when it is supposed to be 70 degrees! I will show my husband these amazing pictures! Thank you so much for sharing!

Pam C.
 

Keri

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My friend just had one born who was sitting back on her pasterns pretty bad. The next day, her front legs had straightened up and then her backs a little later.

Good post and info!!!
 

KenBen

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This is an interesting subject. We had a filly born last July that could not walk period. I had to go out to the barn every hour and help her feed for five days. I would massage her legs on a regular basis. Then I started putting her out on the front lawn on grass for a couple of hours every evening. She would walk on her knees and was back on her pasterns on her rear legs. She would go 20 feet and lay down and rest then get up and go. As time progressed she finally was able to walk on her front pastens. Her back legs straightened out first. I then started putting her out in the paddock everyday and she kept getting stronger and stronger. Looking at her today she is sure a different little horse. Her hooves grew a little crooked and you could see horizontal lines. Two hoof trimmings later the hooves are fine. I can not find any deformities in her legs at this point.

KenBen
 

Relic

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Thankyou for posting this
We had a colt born late Tuesday night and he couldn't use his rear legs at all to stand and nurse so we took turns going out every hour to hold him up so he could nurse till this morning. Now he is much better standing walking around on his own l'm sure hoping tomorrow he'll be kicking at mom then l'll feel better and relax. BUT never having had a foal like this it sure was a worry and my vet in all honesty was not a big help going so far as to say we might have to decide at some point putting him down...so this post made my day.
 

shelia

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This is very informative! Thank you for sharing your vast knowledge. I have a question for you. How old do you evaluate a foal or yearling to know if they will outgrow something, such as toeing out a little and being a little high in the rump?

Shelia B.
 

Tony

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This is very informative! Thank you for sharing your vast knowledge. I have a question for you. How old do you evaluate a foal or yearling to know if they will outgrow something, such as toeing out a little and being a little high in the rump?

Shelia B.
You're welcome and thanks to everyone who has expressed appreciation for the post.

As far as evaluating, that is different with each individual. I have seen several foals within a few days of birth that I said would be National caliber show horses, and four of them actually became National Champions within three years. Others I have had that I hoped would be a show horse that just never came around to my satisfaction. High in the rump usually is a growth factor that hits around the end of a yearling year in my horses, and most grow out of it.
 

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