What would you do?

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stormy

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Well I have been looking for a riding horse lately, have not been on a horse for ~5 yrs, just did not have the desire after my old guy became lame than passed. Through a set of strange cicumstances I came across a retired Standardbred pacer. Went to see him last week, rode for the first time and actually made me cry it had been so long but I am now a very nervous rider. He is a Pacer, legs far from clean but seems a gentle guy and traveled sound. Was represented to me as a 16 yr old, road safe, kid safe, etc. Well when I got home I noticed his coggins said 19 yrs. OK, maybe the owner just isn't sure. Sent his tattoo number to the trotting horse association...he is 22! Losing my old horse just about killed me and now I have purchased a 22 yr old retired pacer who ran in over 200 races in his career! I am supposed to pick him up Sunday, already handed over payment in full. What would you do??
 

lilhorseladie

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WEll, the horse you payed for isn't the horse you are buying...I would say try to back out. Do you have a contract with the horse they were representing to you? Did you pay by check? Can you cancel the check?
 

Charlene

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if the owner had indicated the horse was 19 when you first looked at him, would that have deterred you from purchasing him? if not, when it comes down to it, the jump from 19 to 22 isn't all that huge. at 22, if he is sound and healthy, he could conceivably have many many MANY good years left.

i bought a QH mare when she was 16. she lived to the ripe old age of 37 when i had to make the decision to put her down. she was, without a doubt, the best horse i ever had or ever will have.

an alternative would be, since this horse was misrepresented to you, would be to ask for a 30 or 60 day trial period and get it in writing.

i have a soft spot in my heart for aged horses. i think they are the sweetest things on the planet.
 

MeadowRidge Farm

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If the horse was the perfect horse to you in all other aspects..I sure wouldnt let the age of 22 bother me, afterall you already knew you were buying a aged horse so what is the differance between being 19 or 22? At 19 the horse could pass away tomorrow at 22 he could do the same...or he could live on to a ripe old age of 35 (like our old arabian ..and he is doing great!) and give you many more wonderful years and memories. Corinne
 

Sterling

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If it were me, I'd certainly let the previous owner know what all you found out. If you really fell in love with this boy.....As it seems you may have
, I would'nt let his age be a deal breaker. If he's a quiet, safe, sane horse, chances are he is worth his weight in gold. Enjoy the years he's got left with you......in this day and age 22 is not too terribly old if the horse has been well taken care of. My old appy lived to the ripe old age of 30 and we were still doing shows, pole bending, barrel racing, trail riding, pleasure and he was an ex-endurance horse. He was happiest doing things and going places. I do know where you're coming from about the information not jiving tho. If he's a really good boy, that would'nt matter in the long run. I hope he turns out to take a very big place in your heart.
 

Marty

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Corrine, she is saying 16, not 19. That is a six year difference.

First: Stop payment on the check or put a hold on it NOW until you decide what is best for you.

Then think it through. There is a large difference between buying a horse at 16 and he turns out to be 22.

If you like him well enough, keep him and if you don't, don't. But you need to go back to the sellar and let them know you are nobody's fool and that they have misrepresented this horse to you. Now the other thing is that you also can check the coggins test and be sure it came from him.

Boy I am really sick of all the stupid BS and lying to sell a horse.
 

stormy

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I have to say here this horse is owned by an older couple and I don't think they are misrepresenting him, I think they were not sure of his age and were making a guess....probably never thought of looking him up. I fear a horse that can not be used in a year or two because of lameness and I can only have one, I also fear having to face another loss too soon. He is a good boy, big hearted but yes there is a big differance between 16 and 22!
 

Suzie

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Perhaps they did not know he was as old as he is? To have run 200 races and not have an injury- that is a pretty sound horse.

I have a soft spot for older horses myself. But that is just me. My friends joke about my old horse retirement home here.....but they have to live out their lives somewhere and at least I know they are okay here. I tend to want to sell my younger horses as opposed to my older ones.

BUT- you certainly have been misrepresented this horse. I don't mind an older horse, but I like to know it. Based on how your other horse's passing affected you, I would probably try and see if I could back out on this one. If it was a cash sale with no contract, you may have to just take the horse and then resell it or if you back out, you may not get any of your money back.

Good luck, I hope it works out for the best for you.

Edited to add: I emphasize with your anxiety here too.
I had a horse named Molly I had to put down a couple years back -just killed me.
Today I found a local horse (named Molly too!) Morgan cross that I would love to have but I am afraid to tell my hubby. He will start on me about how hurt I was over Molly passing - I am sure he does not want to go through that again either. So I will just stew about it for a bit. If I go see this horse I know I will want it.
 
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Marty

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Hey Stormy, don't worry about him being 22 so much. My kids rode and showed horses way older than that. I'm not saying things won't fall apart because yes they can at any age. Look at his overall condition as he seems now. That is what you can try to "preserve" for a good few years with any luck. When I see a horse nearing those late teens, I don't wait to start them on something. I always assume artheritis. Horses just don't always show it, but it is usually there. Its like an older person who doesn't complain but feels it in his old bones. There are so many great joint supplents out there that actually work. And besides, with you being a timid rider, it's not like you are going to ride the hair off of him either. Get a great farrier on your team also to keep him trimmed up really good. Baby him, spoil him rotten, ride lightly and intelligently, take your cue from him. Dont' assume he is about to break down for no reason. Just use your common sense.
 

mininik

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If he's sound I would take him anyway. I just purchased a 22 year old Arab mare and she's wonderful.
 

Reble

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I am reading you are hesitating with him, if so talk with the seller and see what you can come up with a contract before taking him since he is older.

Just explain how you are feeling 16 years old and now you found info to make him 22 years old.

Also depending on what you paid maybe a different price now that you know he is older?

Good Luck, yes 22 years old can also be OLD, especially with a race horse .
 
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HGFarm

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I agree with Marty, and if they are not telling the truth about age, what ELSE are they not telling the truth on?? I also get so sick of the crap that flies just to get rid of something they dont want.
 

Shelley

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IMO, as far as big horses go, a good horse is a good horse. A really good horse can be hard to find.

If he is exactly what you are looking for and is in good shape, I'd go for it. Even at 22 he could still be useable for another 10-12 years.

Younger doesn't always mean fitter, or that it will live or even be useable longer. My friend boarded at a barn where another boarder was devastated when her 5 year old mare was diagnosed with navicular.

Perhaps the seller would be willing to refund a portion of your money to compensate for the difference in age.

Good luck, whatever you decide.

Shelley

I have to say here this horse is owned by an older couple and I don't think they are misrepresenting him, I think they were not sure of his age and were making a guess....probably never thought of looking him up. I fear a horse that can not be used in a year or two because of lameness and I can only have one, I also fear having to face another loss too soon. He is a good boy, big hearted but yes there is a big differance between 16 and 22!
 

Keri

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I would either make him return your payment since he's selling you a horse that is 6 years older than what he is saying. Or tell him you'll give him a good home and want him at a way cheaper price becuase of his age. Hope it all works out for you in the end. Good luck.
 

ErikaS.

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My personal opinion is: if he's a good horse, you like him and he's sound, 22 years is just a number. You can lose a horse no matter what age he is and it sucks. I have known plenty of 20+ years horses that lived and were ridable into their 30's.

I kind of think the previous owners did not know exactly what they were selling. So, if you like everything about him but his age (but can deal w/ it), take him, enjoy every minute with him.
 

Minimor

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Personally I would try to get my money back. 22 is quite different from 16--I just don't see myself riding a 30 year old horse, so by 22 the riding years are pretty limited. I figure that by 30--even before 30--a horse has earned his retirement. If the horse is growing old here and still sound then I'd continue riding him as long as he's sound and fit for riding, but I wouldn't go & buy a 22 year old as my next riding horse.
 

RobinRTrueJoy

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I agree with Marty. There is a big differance between 16 and 22.

He sounds like a good old boy that will give you a lot of SAFE, SANE fun.

Talk with the people, tell them your fears about buying an aged horse. Perhaps they will adjust the price accordingly?

Robin
 

stormy

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OK so he is coming home Sunday...tips on keeping the geriatric horse in good health??
 

lilhorseladie

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Congrats on your new horse. I think now, I would focus on the time you have and not on the time you don't. He could really be around a lot longer than you think! Best wishes!
 

mininik

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Old horses needs are pretty much the same as any other horse: regular vaccinations, deworming, dental care, quality feed...
Depending upon his condition he may need something extra to help him keep his weight up, or keep the aches away, or to help with digestion, or to make sure he's getting all he needs nutritionally.

I'll even suggest you look into Dr. Cook's bitless bridle: www.bitlessbridle.com

I decided that after two decades of being ridden my 22 year old girl deserves a break: we ride bareback and bitless!


Don't forget to post pictures!
 
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