Clipping for Dummies – 101

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BeckyG

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They say there is no such thing as a stupid question. Well… that was before I decided to learn how to clip. I need help.


Here is what I have done so far.

I bought some Double Ks, with two size 7 blades and two size 10. (I do not show….. so do not need a close clip… I think the size 7 will be a good length.)

I finally figured out the instructions on how to attached the blade ( Yippee
) I also cleaned the blades with Blade Wash and then lubricated with Clipper Oil. (I thought I was “on a roll”
)

I selected my dog Lucky to test my skills (Poor Lucky
)

I figured he would be a good test subject. He trusts me completely and I thought his coat might approximate the wooly mini fur. (I included a picture to show his coat, below.)

I turned on the clippers… and learned real quick that I had no clue what I was doing.

(I did go against the lay of his hair. And I only clipped a small patch on his hip -- the width of the blade and about a 3 inch long path.)

Here are a few initial (stupid) questions

How are you supposed to hold the clippers? Is the part of the blade with the size and brand name written on it… supposed to be completely flat against the body?

What speed should you use for thick fur?

Should it only take one pass to clip all the fur? Or do you need to go over the same area several times to cut through all the hair?

And for the most stupid question of all……..

What is Hot?

(LOL…. I know the blades will get hot with use. But is “warm” considered “hot”? The blade became warm quickly. Is that normal?)

That’s all, for now.

All Pointers and Advise is Much Appreciated.

My skill is pathetic… just ask Lucky. :DOH!

(This is a picture showing is hair-type... in case that matters)

 

Sandee

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First let me say that Lucky's coat doesn't look to be as thick as a winter mini coat.

How are you supposed to hold the clippers? Is the part of the blade with the size and brand name written on it… supposed to be completely flat against the body?

Yes

What speed should you use for thick fur?

I like to use a wide blade on the first clip to get that really thick long hair off and I use the high speed. Since you don't have the wide you'll have to experiment but I'd think that the high speed would still be the one to use. However this will make the blade get hotter faster.

Should it only take one pass to clip all the fur? Or do you need to go over the same area several times to cut through all the hair?

You'll have to go slowly to keep the blades from getting fouled up and then you end up pulling instead of cutting hair. Someone used to clipping would probably get all the hair in one pass but just begining you should expect to have to go back over it. As stated above I use a wide blade #10 to clear all or most of the long hair and then reclip with a #10 to smooth and pick up any leftover.

And for the most stupid question of all……..

What is Hot?

(LOL…. I know the blades will get hot with use. But is “warm” considered “hot”? The blade became warm quickly. Is that normal?)

Hot is HOT. The blade will get too hot to let sit on your skin and then it's too hot to sit on the animal's skin too.

Practice, and more practice. It does get easier each time.
 

disneyhorse

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Yes, the same clippers for horses can be used on dogs (we do the dogs at the barn when we get the clippers out for bridle paths
)

Yes, the blade with the logo on it should be fairly flat against the skin. It doesn't have to be EXACTLY flat but you will need some practice to make sure that whatever angle you hold it, that you keep it CONSISTENT. It will just take a lot of practice!!!

The higher the speed, the thicker the fur.

Use long strokes, as long as possible, you will want to avoid going over the same place a lot.

The higher the blade number, the closer the cut, and the less "tracks" you might get.

Hot is uncomfortable. I hold the blade against my wrist every so often. If I can't stand it, the animal might not either. Change the blade. Have about two so you can rotate while the other one cools.

It took me several body clips to get the hang of it.

GOod luck,

Andrea
 

CheyAut

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I put the blade against the underside of my wrist. If it's uncomfortable for me, it's uncomfortable for the horse.

When shaving dogs, you should shave in the DIRECTION of the hair growth. With horses, the opposite.

Jessi
 

BeckyG

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Thanks Much for the Tips & Pointers!!!

(I really appreciate it!)

I think I have a better idea of what I am supposed to be doing..... and have enough courage to attempt clipping an actual horse.... soon. (I'm sure Lucky is glad to hear that
)

I think the practice part will be going on for a long, long, long time


(Maybe years. LOL :DOH! LOL)

Thanks Again!

-Becky
 

evedex

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Becky,

You might also want to get a spray can of Kool Lube. Spraying the blades every so often keeps them moving smoother, staying sharp longer and it does cool them down if they aren't HOT....lets you use a set of blades longer before changing them to cool down.

And the most important thing when clipping....make sure your horses are really clean and nicely dry. A dirty horse's coat can dull blades in a few passes while a set of blades should clip several clean horses before needing sharpening.

Also, I was taught to have a container with a bit of blade wash in it and when you change blades, or finish clipping for the day, pop the blades in the container to keep them lubricated and stop them from rusting.

Expect your first clips to be a bit weird looking <LOL>, you will improve in time.

Good Luck!
 

mizbeth

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Hi

From my experience: Yes a clean dry horse will clip better than one who is not. You can also use show sheen while clipping to help the blades slide through the hair. I have found that 7 and 10 blades do not cut well anymore. They used to, but now not. In fact I have noticed that blades in general do not last as long as they used to. Trading out blades often during the clipping will lengthen the life of the blade. You do not want to use them while they are hot as that tends to dull them quickly.

Yes, it will take some practice to learn at what angle to hold the clipper head. Sometimes the clipper head can be flat and other times more upright depending on what you are clipping. But when you do a full clip (after the winter hair is removed) you definately want to use the same even pressure so that your clipping looks neat and nice.

Good luck!
 
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