Is it necessary to grain minatures?

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rockin r

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I have been wondering if it is. Some do, some don't, some just give vitamins, plus pasture/hay etc... Is it truely necessary to give them feed/grain with or without adequate grazing/pasture??? I will always give mine feed/hay, as they are dry lotted most of the time.
 

txminipinto

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I think if you have excellent pasture for them and all they do is graze, then no its not necessary. But if your pasture lacks nutrients or they are being asked to work, then they need some sort of supplement.
 

kaykay

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For ME if a mini is mature, not breeding and not working then MOST have no reason for grain. Especially if they have good hay and or pasture. Show horses and young horses for sure need the extra nutrients of a good feed.
 

HGFarm

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My vet does not recommend grain or a bunch of additives, unless the horse is a mare nursing a foal, a horse in HARD training that may need it, a rescue that needs all the help it can get, but for idle horses or in light work, we have never fed grain. I take care, though that they are getting the best hay, have access to fresh water and salt and their other medical stuff is current.
 

Matt73

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That's why I love the Gro 'n Win. Aside from good hay, that's all mine get. It's such a small amount (1/4lb/day for my boys and .5lb for Lexus) that they feel they're getting a "treat" while still getting protein and vitamins etc. Overgraining any horse, big or small, can mean trouble down the line (colic, laminitis, etc.).
 

whitney

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Mine are on just NICE 1 flake of grass hay and 2 cups of soaked alfalfa pellets (something to put the flaxseed in), a trace mineral block and are STILL TO PLUMP, they also are drylotted for 23 1/2 hours a day.
 

Leeana

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No, they do not "need" it. Only horses that i grain are junior horses (weanlings, yearlings, two year olds), Show Horses. Broodmares are on pasture with salt black, and a mineral lick (a sweet mineral lick, in a container ..not the salt mineral blocks, i cannot remember what its called of the top of my head) and they get hay available. I have one broodmare in the barn that i feed / grain separate, as she has a thyroid and needs suppliments and daily meds so she is kept seperate for that reason.
 

barnbum

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I feed the same as Matt.
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I researched this for soooo long and it's what works for my herd. It seems we have high caloric air here in upstate NY.
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I give everyone about 1/4 cup of GnW twice a day with whole flax and call it good. They act like they're getting a meal.
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Pasture, hay, and that. Now when I have foals--I give them Contender until they're about 6 months, then make the switch to GnW.

I think it's indivdual for each horse. It's hard for me to imagine a hard keeper--big or small--we've never had one. :DOH!
 

rockin r

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I am seriuosly considering changing my feeding program, "ALL" my minis are definatly plump. They are rotated onto grass (bermuda). But not everyday. So I guess the ones who are on grass, when I feed them they will not get any feed. They all get excellent quality Alfalfa in the am and (Bermuda in the pm, if it is available, if not they get Alfalfa in the pm also). I am open to all suggestions. If you would rather email or pm me that is fine. I know there is a lot of opinions on the subject.
 

disneyhorse

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Basically there are two "types" of feed: Forages and Concentrates. A horse should have the MAJORITY of it's food in Forage form. Forages are high fiber foods such as hays, and may include a little bit of beet pulp which is not long stem fiber.

Concentrates are things such as grain, corn oil, rice bran, etc. that are a concentrated form of calories.

I would say no, not all horses need grain (concentrates). You add grain to the diet when just forage won't do. Nursing mares, growing youngsters, performance horses, halter horses that are being exercise to fit them for showing... these horses are going to have greater caloric demands than can be met without consuming extreme amounts of forage.

This is how I look at horse nutrition in the most basic elements.

I hope this helps answer your question.

Andrea
 

zoey829

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Great topic. I enjoy the responses. I grain but my horses work or they are nursing mares. ALthough, I must admit, my are plump
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Miniv

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Basically there are two "types" of feed: Forages and Concentrates. A horse should have the MAJORITY of it's food in Forage form. Forages are high fiber foods such as hays, and may include a little bit of beet pulp which is not long stem fiber.

Concentrates are things such as grain, corn oil, rice bran, etc. that are a concentrated form of calories.

I would say no, not all horses need grain (concentrates). You add grain to the diet when just forage won't do. Nursing mares, growing youngsters, performance horses, halter horses that are being exercise to fit them for showing... these horses are going to have greater caloric demands than can be met without consuming extreme amounts of forage.

This is how I look at horse nutrition in the most basic elements.

I hope this helps answer your question.

Andrea

Andrea/Disneyhorse put it very well........ Just want to add that if the forage is lacking in a needed vitamin or mineral, then you would need to supplement for it. It's more common for hay to be lacking in certain minerals, depending on the region.....for example selenium is lacking in our area.
 

Gena

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That's why I love the Gro 'n Win. Aside from good hay, that's all mine get. It's such a small amount (1/4lb/day for my boys and .5lb for Lexus) that they feel they're getting a "treat" while still getting protein and vitamins etc. Overgraining any horse, big or small, can mean trouble down the line (colic, laminitis, etc.).
I loved the Gro N Win too and what works for Matt worked for us too, along with quality grass hay. We also provided at all times the Buckeye free choice minerals and free choice salts for them (with added selenium that we lack in our area)
 

rabbitsfizz

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Mine get nothing but pasture, no grain, no additives.

They have a mineral block, that is all.

The broodmares keep excellent weight on grass alone, even when they have foals nursing.

I do feed the foals, separate to the mares, from around a week to ten days old as I like to have them up to speed at weaning.

I think it is this, feeding the foals, that prevents the mares from being "dragged down", since I have always fed my foals, and, by the time they are ready to be be weaned they are eating a LOT, I have never had a mare dragged down by a foal, or lose weight at all.

Feeding the mare just makes her produce more milk, which is not required.

Feeding the foal puts the weight where it is needed.
 

wade3504

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Most horses, mini or big, do not need grain if they have access to enough grass and or hay. Most people just feel they need to feed grain.

Amanda
 

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