Golf Cart Exercise?

Discussion in 'Miniature Horse Forum' started by JAX, Mar 4, 2014.

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  1. Mar 4, 2014 #1

    JAX

    JAX

    JAX

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    For those of you that use a golf cart to help you exercise your horses... How do you do it? Do you just hold the lead out to the side? Do you tie them? Did you build something special that goes off to the side or behind or in front where you can see them better? I have been trying to use the round pen but I get sick to my stomach so quick...I'm so bad that I cannot even handle riding a nice slow carousel without getting sick. I have a four wheeler but its diesel and Im scared that if I hold the lead rope to the side that I will somehow run over a hoof if they shy at something and my four wheeler is quite fast and when I let go of the gas its a VERY quick stop without ever touching the brake! So I am now contemplating a golf cart because I am assuming it would be slower,quieter and maybe safer but was looking for input from you that have done this before and what I should be looking for and what to steer clear of etc. Sorry for rambling lol. Thanks in advance for any advice!!
     
  2. Mar 5, 2014 #2

    amysue

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    A neighbor of mine runs her dogs on her atv. She builtva pipe rail frame off the back and front fenders to clip the dogs to so as to avoid running them over. I know someone who turns horses out and brings them in tied to the back of an atv b/c her pasture is a long way from the stable. I have never worked horses that way, but I suppose if you get the horse used to it and use a safety tie so as not to hang him it is feasable. I can tell you that if your horse is familiar with lounging, try not following him with your eye while free lounging in the pen. Focus on one spot and dont move, the horse will move into your line of sight and wont appear like a "still moving" target that makes you sick.
     
  3. Mar 5, 2014 #3

    wildoak

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    I pony from my golf cart all the time.... have only ever had one horse who didn't get it, she would sit back every few minutes so I gave up on her. My cart is electric, it's quiet and doesn't go all that fast - I love being able to get them out of the round pen, out in the pasture and around, and I think they love it too. Doesn't take long for most to catch on. I tie them on both sides to the roof support although adding a piece that extended a little further would keep their feet away from the cart a little better.. Most of mine are right up beside me, and I carry a short crop in case I have one who like to get too close - just holding it in front of them usually keeps them a safe distance / not underfoot.

    The only caution I would give is just keep a close eye on them. You can sure injure a neck if something scares them, they set back and you don't react quickly.

    Jan
     
  4. Mar 5, 2014 #4

    Jean_B

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    Like Jan said, need to be very watchful. And make sure they will "pony" well at a slow walk before trying any trotting. Might also want to use a bungie type of tie as well, just to be on the safe side. I do know of one that bolted and broke it's neck (not fatal) because of being tied with a regular lead rope, and they started trotting before the horse totally "got it."
     
  5. Mar 5, 2014 #5

    Barnmother

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    We did this at Nationals in Reno one year, we wrapped the leadrope around the roof support and held it, we didn't tie it. That way in a pinch we could let go of the horse, although we never had too. Actually took a passenger and managed to take four over to be measured at one time but using the golf cart.
     
  6. Mar 5, 2014 #6

    Mini Paradise

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    I too use a golf cart to exercise my show horses. My golf cart is electric, very quiet and can go slow or somewhat fast if I want the horse to canter beside me instead of trotting. Most of the time I make them work at a fast trot. I just taught an 11 month filly how to work on the golf cart. I started her off by holding the leadline (i was afraid to tie her with her being so young and justbstarting out) and going very very slow. Every horse is different in learning, sone take longer to learn than others. This filly is very intelligent and after about 5 days of slow walking I decided to try a slow trot (again no tying, and at a slow pace for trot). She did great on first trot but likes to go faster. So now I work her at a fast pace (not too fast, just fast enough to get her to extend when trotting). She never pulls back or hits the brakes so I know she really enjoys doing the golf cart. On my golf cart I loop the leadline around the arm of my seat, but it is not tied, just gives me stability in case she does pull back. If uou hold thr leadline in your hand and the horse pulls back out of nowhere it could hurt or even sprint your wrist probably. I also don't like to tie them above their head level. I prefer having the lead right beside them, not above or too low that they accidently might step over it. I also work in an area that I fenced off from another pasture for driving but iy works great for golf cart. I do not work in an area where there are other horses. That reason is, last year I had a 2 year old stallion in the pasture (before it was fenced off) and I would work my show geldings on the golf cart. Well one day the stallion decided to go after the gelding and the gelding ran out in front of the golf cart and it bumped him. It did more than just bump him. It broke his knee. Long story short there was nothing that could be done so I had to put him down. I also made a mistake having him tied too close to the front of the golf cart even though he was used to being tied there and has worked like that every time he went out on the golf cart. So now I keep them right at my side. You have to be careful and be able to see them when working them on the golf cart. Even those that are used to doing it can do something unexpected out of nowhere. I would not recommend tying a horse "behind" the golf cart either.
     
  7. Mar 5, 2014 #7

    JAX

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    Mini Paradise

    Oh goodness thoughts like what happened to your guy is what has been going through my head and wondering if there isn't some way I could do it safer somehow.

    So do golf carts all go about the same speed? Is it easy to keep them at a steady speed? When you let up on gas pedal do they stop fast or do you need to depress brake for that (which would make it so much smoother than mine lol)? Different voltage carts does that mean one is slower than another? Do any of yours have a lift on them? Would that make it more dangerous or would one with a 6" lift be ok? Sorry for all of these questions I am just trying to figure out which ones I should be looking at.
     
  8. Mar 6, 2014 #8

    SampleMM

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    Be very careful when using a golf cart! Even some of my professionally trained minis had to be held as opposed to being tied. Honestly, to be done safely you need two people. A driver of the cart and the other person holding onto the lead rope. If you have them tied and you are buzzing up and down hills and your horse trips, it could be fatal. Also, not all golf carts are fast. My husband bought me one that is super fast. It has a double battery system and not all have that.
     
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  9. Mar 8, 2014 #9

    wildoak

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    I've ponied for years without any issues, you just need to use common sense and really pay attention. No earbuds, no loose horses, no too loose lead ropes... Just start slow and don't assume anything lol.

    Accidents can happen - I know of one who broke her neck, but it was an unbroke horse being essentially dragged to the barn. Whole 'nother story.... [​IMG]
     
  10. Mar 8, 2014 #10

    Vertical Limit

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    Absolutely without a doubt the best advice. We have ponied large horses for years and would never consider tying. I don't care how broke a horse is. I could go on with the horror stories. Two people all of the time.
     
  11. Mar 9, 2014 #11

    Marty

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    I have a golf cart and I really did try it but found it more trouble than what its' worth. I don't have anyone else to watch what is going on back there and I won't tie them up. That's just too dangerous. You can't see how they are moving and you have to keep slowing down and speeding up and stopping. Seriously, its such a pain in the arm holding them on the end of a lead rope. It is much more effective to me to get them in the round pen and move them properly and the gaits I want. Then I can see what I have going on. The only time I will do it is if I have one that I think is trying to colic and I'm exhausted of walking and that would be out of sheer desperation.
     
  12. Mar 12, 2014 #12

    JAX

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    Thank you all very much for your comments. So I don't supposed that motion sickness patches would work for me... anyone ever try that lol??? Funny thing is I have no problems with sea sickness and can ride just about any roller coaster, turn me in a circle and I will turn green immediately and OMG watch out!!!!!!
     
  13. Mar 13, 2014 #13

    SampleMM

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    Do you get motion sickness going straight? I used my driveway to go up and down. ( cart on driveway-- horse on lawn)It helps that mine is almost 1/4 mile long. If you can get someone to drive the cart and you pony the horse off the side, you can get some awesome results. Especially if you have a hill and get them to long trot. It is more fun for the horse than just going round and round in a pen. IMHO
     
  14. Mar 13, 2014 #14

    amysue

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    If lunging makes you sick and focusing on one stationary target doesn't help, try ground driving your horse or hand walking/jogging him. If you walk in a small circle following him on the lounge, rather than spinning in place it may help. Put a hula hoopbon the ground and walk around the outer circumfrence of it while lunging to guide you. If all else fails, find a neighborhood kid to lunge him for you. I doubt you'll have a hard time finding a kid who wants to play with ponies. I get motion sickness when longing in a small pen and if I try and focus my eyes elsewhere it helps.
     
  15. Mar 13, 2014 #15

    JAX

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    Ok I am going to go try out a few golf carts to check out speed etc. No I don't get sick going straight thank goodness then id be in even more trouble hahaha. I have a 60' round pen and have tried following (my eyes) on the horses shoulder, on the head, on the butt, at background only, at the ground. The best I have found is to walk in a circle and do everything I can not to look at the horse but to keep glancing at all different objects here and there. Only problem with that is when I'm trying to work a lazy one (most of mine lol).
     

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