Please Critique

Miniature Horse Talk Forums

Help Support Miniature Horse Talk Forums:

midnight star stables

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2005
Messages
5,362
Reaction score
0
Location
Pefferlaw, Ontario
Hey

this is midnight again!

we have a show on the 20th of august.. what can i do to make him look his best?

he is really not fat, he has wide set ribs, he is in his 20's, & we are starting to see his ribs.. we are working on that tho..

Does he look better standing square or streched?

his neck is weak/ small/ thin on the right side.. can that be fixed?

any coments are welcome, tell me what YOU think!


i love this boy!


here you go:















thanks, tell me what you think!

ps. Lyn i look forward to your post.. it might be harsh, but they useally help!

thanks Desiree
 

midnight star stables

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2005
Messages
5,362
Reaction score
0
Location
Pefferlaw, Ontario
i have no scaner, & can only download my pics w/ our digetal cramera & it is broken... so i took pic w/ a regular camera, got them developed & took pictures of my pictures w/ my webcam...

sorry 4 the quality... but they are not that bad... you can still see his face, legs & body shape... it can be done... please, this is our only real show & its really important to us so please try... we will try to get our cam fixed

please critique him

desiree
 

Mini~Lover

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2004
Messages
51
Reaction score
0
I cant really critique him cuz I don tknow much about that. But I just wanted to say that he looks great and he is georgous!! Doesnt look fat to me at all, looks like he has long legs and a good sized neck. Good luck at the show, let us know how its goes!!

Katie
 

Ashley

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
5,529
Reaction score
72
I think he needs some equine senior. THat will help his over all condition and probably fatten up his neck a bit, which will make it look better.

Over all you can tell he is a old horse, and that may hurt you in the show ring.
 

midnight star stables

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2005
Messages
5,362
Reaction score
0
Location
Pefferlaw, Ontario
like i said "he is really not fat, he has wide set ribs, he is in his 20's, & we are starting to see his ribs.. we are working on that tho.." as of yesterday he was put on feed to give him energy & fatten him up & make him more fit.. these pics were taken 3 days before his new feed...

his mane is 2 1/2" wide across... it was all bent over on one side & in april, we thined his mane out to find that that side of his nech is weak(not from bad feed or poor conditioning), on the other side of his neck, it is thick & strong w/ lots of muscel..

is there a way 2 hide old age?

does he look better standing square or streched?

desiree
 

Mini~Lover

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 12, 2004
Messages
51
Reaction score
0
Personaly for this guy I like him better square with his head streached. It hides his showing ribs better. Sorry I couldnt help more,

Katie
 

midnight star stables

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2005
Messages
5,362
Reaction score
0
Location
Pefferlaw, Ontario
just lately, within this year he has started losing weight because of his age, we did not know this untill we clipped him, then we got our vet in & together made midnight a specail food program, so that by the time of the show, you will not be able to see his ribs...

within a few weeks you won't be able to see his ribs! minus his ribs, does he look better standing square or streched? w/ his body comfermation, is he a strech type of horse?

thx desiree
 

Voodoo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2004
Messages
1,091
Reaction score
0
Location
Cedar City, Ut
Mind you my opinion is only my opinion and I don't show much sooooooo. I like to see a horse standing square rather than all stretched out, and I like his look better that way. I think that even as an old horse he needs more exercise to build the shoulder, and hip muscles as well as developing some fat and muscle over his back and ribs. That will really help hide his age to get all that filled out and covered up. It will also help tuck his belly up some more and hide the ribs better. Now on an older horse as I'm sure you know you can't do the faster hard exercises, but alot of slow lunging, or hand leading up and down hills, or in a sandy wash if you have access to one. A couple things that will help a little with his neck is to ground drive him or bit him up (not too tightly) and get him to flex at the poll. That will help build the neck muscles up alot. You can also stretch him side to side, take a treat and ask him to stand in one place. Then take the treat and lure his head back towards the middle of his ribs. Have him hold it a couple seconds, then give him the treat and do it the other way. If you also pull the lead rope around as you do this he would learn to flex to the lead and you wouldn't need the treats anymore. 5-6 sets of side flexes daily is plenty to start and then maybe work it up to 10 and have him hold it longer, say 6-8 seconds instead of 2. You asked about hiding his age, well about the only thing I can think of besides exercise is to dye the graying hairs around the eyes and muzzle (not sure if dying is legal in the ring). In all truth though I think he looks excellent and you take very good care of him. An old horse is an old horse and it's very hard to hide in the ring. Most of all take him and have a really great time. It is more about the memories you make with your horse than the ribbons you do or don't win.
I promise you'll remember the funny things you saw, the people you met, and the things you did much longer than what place you were in the show. Best of luck and I'm sure you'll do great.
 

Marty

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
13,596
Reaction score
520
Location
Tennessee
Hello Miss Desiree,

I do not critique either and I could not also see your pictures if I did.

I can tell you that I have shown many older and ageing horses. Although exhibiting an ageing horse will find it difficult to compete against younger horses, it can be done successfully too if you are very careful about it learn about the extra special care that an ageing horse requires. I know that you love your Midnight, but he does need more than just your love. He needs you to become knowledgeable on geriatric care considering his age. So I would like to suggest to you that you do a Google search and begin to educated yourself on things you can do to help Midnight thrive in his Golden Years.

The other thing I would suggest to you is to ask the judge at the show for his/her opinion after your class is over. I am sure the judge can shed some more light on things for you that you may not be considering. Most judges are happy to do that.

Furthermore I do believe that a good outward appearance starts from within, so before you subject your horse to the stress and riggers of a horse show, (espeically in the heat) I suggest that you have your vet do a good exam on him first.

Here is one short article that I have selected for you to get a jump start on your research. Please pay attention to it.

Good luck and best wishes to you.



The older horse

It is not only humans that are living longer, our horses are too!. Improvements in diet, management and veterinary care mean that horses and ponies can easily live into their 20s and 30s. The average age for a horse is about 24 years. Just like young animals, older animals need special care to keep them happy and healthy. Here’s some good advice on how to care for your ageing horse.

When is a horse ‘old’?

For young horses, one year is equal to about 3.5 years of a human’s life. So, a 10-year-old horse is equivalent to a 35-year-old human. The ratio changes slightly as horses get older, when one year is equal to about 3 human years: so a 20-year-old horse is equal to a 60-year-old human. A horse is considered to be old or ‘geriatric’ when it has reached 20 years of age, but many horses are still physically fit when they reach

this age.

Are there any signs of ageing?

Older horses may show the following changes:

Appearance:

Sagging topline resulting in a ‘sway’ or dipped back with prominent withers

Sagging skin and muscle degeneration

Characteristic drooping lower lip

Cataract development

Face has a hollowed appearance with deepening depressions above the eyes

Like humans, grey hairs will appear - these will be especially noticeable around the eyes, ears, forehead and muzzle

Other signs:

Messy eating habits, difficulty eating or loss of appetite - the result of worn/missing teeth

Lameness due to arthritis.

Weight loss

Why do older horses need more care?

We can see from the outward signs of ageing that a horse is getting old, but changes are happening inside the body too:

The heart, liver, kidneys, digestive tract and immune system become less efficient

Bones become brittle

Muscles may become weaker and the joints and tendons lose their elasticity

Hormonal changes can adversely affect body condition

These effects of ageing mean that your horse is more susceptible to illness and that recovery from disease or injury will be slower.

What special care do I need to provide?

Dental - now that your horse is getting older it is advisable that your horse has his teeth checked twice a year or at any time that you notice a problem such as weight loss or difficulty chewing. If your horse has had regular dental treatment throughout his life, it is far more likely that his teeth will be in working order when he is approaching his thirties.

Nutritional - proper nutrition is essential to a healthy, older horse. Their digestive system becomes less efficient in addition to hormonal and metabolic changes that affect their digestion and absorption of the essential nutrients needed.

A diet for an older horse should be:

Highly palatable

Easy to chew and swallow

Dust free

High in protein and fibre

Provide essential vitamins and minerals

High in energy

Easy to digest

Before changing your horse’s diet, consult your vet, he will probably want to do some tests to check for any kidney or liver problems. If you do need to change your horse’s diet, make sure you do it over a period of 7-10 days, unexpected changes can disrupt the digestive system. Continue to supply lots of water, if your horse isn’t getting enough he may develop colic or start to suffer from constipation. If you do find it difficult to persuade your horse to drink plenty of water you may need to provide water-soaked feeds or mashes.

General care - sensible management of your older horse is essential to his general well-being. Don’t forget the routine care that he has had throughout his earlier years:

Routine worming and vaccinations are more important than ever

Provision of shelter and warm stabling in the winter

Regular twice-daily checks to keep an eye on changes in body condition, injuries, etc

Give your horse adequate exercise to maintain muscle tone, flexibility and mobility. Just because your horse is getting old doesn’t mean he won’t need regular exercise. You may want to consult your vet if you are unsure.

Caring for your horse’s feet is also very important. If your horse is still shod he will need to see the farrier every 5-8 weeks or as necessary. Even if your horse doesn’t wear shoes, he will still need to have his feet trimmed and checked regularly.

If all of these points are followed, there is no reason why your older horse should not continue to live his life as he did when he was a younger animal.

What specific problems might my horse develop in later life?

Arthritis - this affects one or more of your horse’s joints and is very common to the older horse. Signs include stiffness or lameness - this usually improves with exercise. Arthritis is usually worsened by cold, damp weather, and once present will not go away. The condition, however, can be controlled. Horses can continue to work on a low dose of painkiller. Other options include herbal remedies and copper bands. The welfare of your horse must always be considered, if your horse is not happy and is not able to live a contented life, then euthanasia might be an option.

Dental - as your horse gets older his teeth will continue to grow, even so, the rate of wear is often faster than any new growth. Problems include worn down cheek teeth resulting in inability to chew food properly. Sharp edges or points may develop causing pain on chewing, reduced food intake infection. Loose teeth are also a common problem, this is usually due to an infection and the tooth will probably have to be removed. Due to no fault of your own, your horse may have no teeth at all - do NOT panic - in this situation your horse’s diet will have to be changed substantially, but it is unlikely that it should make any difference to his health or general well-being.

Liver and kidney - degeneration of the liver and kidney is more common in

the older horse. This reduces the ability of the organs to function

properly. Possible signs will include weight loss and loss of appetite. If

your horse suffers from either of these problems, it may require diet

changes. If your horse develops a more severe problem he might start to

behave differently - he will become irritable, start circling and

headpressing. Liver and kidney degeneration are problems that must be seen

by your vet. Your vet will discuss the possibilities and the management of

it with you.

Pituitary / thyroid dysfunction - pituitary (glands at the base of the brain that help to control growth) dysfunction include the following signs:

Chronic laminitis

Failure to shed coat (Cushing’s Disease)

Increase in water intake

Increase in urination

Thyroid (gland in the neck that helps to control body growth) dysfunction

include both low (‘hypo’) and high (‘hyper’) thyroid production

Fatigue

Signs of excessive thyroid production include:

Heart beat irregularities

Increase in water intake

Restlessness

Weight loss despite increased appetite

Pituitary and thyroid dysfunction are problems that must be seen by your vet. Your vet will discuss the possibilities and the management of it with you.

Reproductive - this function also declines slowly as your horse gets older. A reduction in hormone efficiency will lead to infertility in both mares and stallions. Geldings can also suffer from infections and swelling in the sheath leading to difficulty urinating. Regular hygiene is important to help keep bacteria and abnormal fluid accumulation at bay.

Tumours - ageing may be associated with an increased incidence of some types of tumours but the relationship of age and tumour occurence is much less clear than in the human. Tumours are quite rare in the horse other than sarcoids and melanomas. Sarcoids are wart-like masses that occur most commonly on the lower legs but can occur on any part of the body. Melanomas are tumours common in the skin, eye and oral cavity which are commonly seen in aged grey horses.

What if my horse is just too old?

There comes a time for every horse when things just get too much. As responsible horse owners, we need to make sure that our horses have the best treatment possible but if the time comes when the accumulation of years of wear and tear and general old age become too much, euthanasia is the kindest thing for a horse who is no longer able to have the quality of life he has always been used to.
 

mizbeth

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
1,790
Reaction score
3
I think he needs some good feed too!

Hard to tell what he looks like in the photos as the quality is not very good.

Good luck with him, sounds like he has a wonderful home!

Beth
 

midnight star stables

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2005
Messages
5,362
Reaction score
0
Location
Pefferlaw, Ontario
Marty said:
Hello Miss Desiree,
I do not critique either and I could not also see your pictures if I did.

I can tell you that I have shown many older and ageing horses. Although exhibiting an ageing horse will find it difficult to compete against younger horses, it can be done successfully too if you are very careful about it learn about the extra special care that an ageing horse requires. I know that you love your Midnight, but he does need more than just your love. He needs you to become knowledgeable on geriatric care  considering his age.  So I would like to suggest to you that you do a Google search and begin to educated yourself on things you can do to help Midnight thrive in his Golden Years.

The other thing I would suggest to you is to ask the judge at the show for his/her opinion after your class is over. I am sure the judge can shed some more light on things for you that you may not be considering. Most judges are happy to do that.

Furthermore I do believe that a good outward appearance starts from within, so before you subject your horse to the stress and  riggers of a horse show,  (espeically in the heat) I suggest that you have your vet do a good exam on him first.

Here is one short article that I have selected for you to get a jump start on your research. Please pay attention to it.

Good luck and best wishes to you.



The older horse

It is not only humans that are living longer, our horses are too!.  Improvements in diet, management and veterinary care mean that horses and ponies can easily live into their 20s and 30s. The average age for a horse is about 24 years.  Just like young animals, older animals need special care to keep them happy and healthy. Here’s some good advice on how to care for your ageing horse.

When is a horse ‘old’?

For young horses, one year is equal to about 3.5 years of a human’s life.  So, a 10-year-old horse is equivalent to a 35-year-old human. The ratio changes slightly as horses get older, when one year is equal to about 3 human years: so a 20-year-old horse is equal to a 60-year-old human.  A horse is considered to be old or ‘geriatric’ when it has reached 20 years of age, but many horses are still physically fit when they reach

this age. 

Are there any signs of ageing?

Older horses may show the following changes: 

Appearance:

Sagging topline resulting in a ‘sway’ or dipped back with prominent withers

Sagging skin and muscle degeneration

Characteristic drooping lower lip

Cataract development

Face has a hollowed appearance with deepening depressions above the eyes

Like humans, grey hairs will appear - these will be especially noticeable around the eyes, ears, forehead and muzzle

Other signs:

Messy eating habits, difficulty eating or loss of appetite - the result of worn/missing teeth

Lameness due to arthritis.

Weight loss

Why do older horses need more care?

We can see from the outward signs of ageing that a horse is getting old, but changes are happening inside the body too:

The heart, liver, kidneys, digestive tract and immune system become less efficient

Bones become brittle

Muscles may become weaker and the joints and tendons lose their elasticity

Hormonal changes can adversely affect body condition

These effects of ageing mean that your horse is more susceptible to illness and that recovery from disease or injury will be slower.

What special care do I need to provide?

Dental - now that your horse is getting older it is advisable that your horse has his teeth checked twice a year or at any time that you notice a problem such as weight loss or difficulty chewing. If your horse has had regular dental treatment throughout his life, it is far more likely that his teeth will be in working order when he is approaching his thirties. 

Nutritional - proper nutrition is essential to a healthy, older horse.  Their digestive system becomes less efficient in addition to hormonal and metabolic changes that affect their digestion and absorption of the essential nutrients needed. 

A diet for an older horse should be: 

Highly palatable

Easy to chew and swallow

Dust free

High in protein and fibre

Provide essential vitamins and minerals

High in energy

Easy to digest

Before changing your horse’s diet, consult your vet, he will probably want to do some tests to check for any kidney or liver problems.  If you do need to change your horse’s diet, make sure you do it over a period of 7-10 days, unexpected changes can disrupt the digestive system.  Continue to supply lots of water, if your horse isn’t getting enough he may develop colic or start to suffer from constipation.  If you do find it difficult to persuade your horse to drink plenty of water you may need to provide water-soaked feeds or mashes. 

General care - sensible management of your older horse is essential to his general well-being. Don’t forget the routine care that he has had throughout his earlier years: 

Routine worming and vaccinations are more important than ever

Provision of shelter and warm stabling in the winter

Regular twice-daily checks to keep an eye on changes in body condition, injuries, etc

Give your horse adequate exercise to maintain muscle tone, flexibility and mobility.  Just because your horse is getting old doesn’t mean he won’t need regular exercise. You may want to consult your vet if you are unsure.

Caring for your horse’s feet is also very important. If your horse is still shod he will need to see the farrier every 5-8 weeks or as necessary.  Even if your horse doesn’t wear shoes, he will still need to have his feet trimmed and checked regularly.

If all of these points are followed, there is no reason why your older horse should not continue to live his life as he did when he was a younger animal.

What specific problems might my horse develop in later life? 

Arthritis - this affects one or more of your horse’s joints and is very common to the older horse. Signs include stiffness or lameness - this usually improves with exercise. Arthritis is usually worsened by cold, damp weather, and once present will not go away. The condition, however, can be controlled.  Horses can continue to work on a low dose of painkiller. Other options include herbal remedies and copper bands. The welfare of your horse must always be considered, if your horse is not happy and is not able to live a contented life, then euthanasia might be an option. 

Dental - as your horse gets older his teeth will continue to grow, even so, the rate of wear is often faster than any new growth. Problems include worn down cheek teeth resulting in inability to chew food properly. Sharp edges or points may develop causing pain on chewing, reduced food intake infection. Loose teeth are also a common problem, this is usually due to an infection and the tooth will probably have to be removed. Due to no fault of your own, your horse may have no teeth at all - do NOT panic - in this situation your horse’s diet will have to be changed substantially, but it is unlikely that it should make any difference to his health or general well-being. 

Liver and kidney - degeneration of the liver and kidney is more common in

the older horse. This reduces the ability of the organs to function

properly. Possible signs will include weight loss and loss of appetite. If

your horse suffers from either of these problems, it may require diet

changes. If your horse develops a more severe problem he might start to

behave differently - he will become irritable, start circling and

headpressing. Liver and kidney degeneration are problems that must be seen

by your vet. Your vet will discuss the possibilities and the management of

it with you. 

Pituitary / thyroid dysfunction - pituitary (glands at the base of the brain that help to control growth) dysfunction include the following signs:

Chronic laminitis

Failure to shed coat (Cushing’s Disease)

Increase in water intake

Increase in urination

Thyroid (gland in the neck that helps to control body growth) dysfunction

include both low (‘hypo’) and high (‘hyper’) thyroid production 

Fatigue

Signs of excessive thyroid production include:

Heart beat irregularities

Increase in water intake

Restlessness

Weight loss despite increased appetite

Pituitary and thyroid dysfunction are problems that must be seen by your vet.  Your vet will discuss the possibilities and the management of it with you.

Reproductive - this function also declines slowly as your horse gets older.  A reduction in hormone efficiency will lead to infertility in both mares and stallions. Geldings can also suffer from infections and swelling in the sheath leading to difficulty urinating.  Regular hygiene is important to help keep bacteria and abnormal fluid accumulation at bay. 

Tumours - ageing may be associated with an increased incidence of some types of tumours but the relationship of age and tumour occurence is much less clear than in the human.  Tumours are quite rare in the horse other than sarcoids and melanomas.  Sarcoids are wart-like masses that occur most commonly on the lower legs but can occur on any part of the body.  Melanomas are tumours common in the skin, eye and oral cavity which are commonly seen in aged grey horses.

What if my horse is just too old?

There comes a time for every horse when things just get too much.  As responsible horse owners, we need to make sure that our horses have the best treatment possible but if the time comes when the accumulation of years of wear and tear and general old age become too much, euthanasia is the kindest thing for a horse who is no longer able to have the quality of life he has always been used to.

423066[/snapback]

thanks marty, lots of neat info in there!midnight only has a few ofthose signs, so i am not really gonna worrie alot this year because showing & working is what he loves to do! i have to stop him because of his age!!! we do make sure he has the best life.. & i really will ask my judge... should i ask him in the ring???
thanks

"A couple things that will help a little with his neck is to ground drive him or bit him up (not too tightly) and get him to flex at the poll. That will help build the neck muscles up alot." how do i do this.. i know what you mean, just how do i do this? lol thx.

is there any physical trait i can fix on this old boy??

thx

desiree
 

Marty

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
13,596
Reaction score
520
Location
Tennessee
i really will ask my judge... should i ask him in the ring??? thanks

That depends. If you are all finished being judged and still standing around in the ring waiting to be called or whatever, and the judge is standing there finished doing nothing, then maybe you can ask then.

Don't interrupt him however if you see he's busy with anything.

You may want to approach him outside the ring later on when he's available.
 

rabbitsfizz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2003
Messages
10,938
Reaction score
385
Location
England
Desi, he definitely needs a good feed. Speaking as the owner of a (very) senior horse I can tell you, unfortunately, the best way is not to let them get thin in the first place!! Rabbit has never been thin in his life, and he can still pick up ribbons at his one show a year, at 26. I retired him not because he could not do the work, or because he did not enjoy it, I think if I let him he would go to one every week, but because I am his caretaker, and I have to decide what is best for him. At his age he should be at home, breeding mares and chilling out, in familiar surroundings. He would jump and run and generally misbehave all day if he were allowed to. It would also, eventually, kill him. He would get arthritis from the jumping, which will probably not notice for up to a couple of years as it can come on very gradually and there is NO way you will notice it, or he could have a heart attack. These are the "Golden Years" the time when a horse is running down. Whatever your goals for Midnight they have to be tempered by the fact that he is an OLD horse. I know you do not want to hear this, and I know you think, because he is your horse and you are still young enough to feel this way, that you know better, and he does not fit in any of these pictures. You want a show horse, a driving horse, a jumping horse. At 21- 26 your horse is too old to start doing all these things seriously. Remember- HE will pay the price, NOT you!!!!
 

lyn_j

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
6,159
Reaction score
1
[SIZE=14pt]Desiree the pics are too grainey for me to see. I went back to the other pics you had posted of him before and I will tell you honestly I dont think he is showable anymore at this age. What you describe is a fallen crest on his neck. That isnt muscle you see it is fat pads that are broken down and over. He is too thin, doesnt look fat looks emaciated rather ..... too thin with wasted muscle from the shape I see in the pics. I know you love him dearly but dont try to show him in halter classes. It wont do you or him any favors and there may be people there that will hurt your feelings and tell you so right there. I dont want to hurt your feelings either. If you HAVE to show him stand him square. I will tell you this that his pot belly, pointy hips and fallen crest will count very much against him. He has from the other post pics a plain head, short low set neck and he appears cow hocked in the back. Im really sorry to tell you things you dont want to hear and Im really trying to be not harsh about it. Cant he just stay home and be loved??? Put him on a Senior complete feed. make sure his teeth are floated and just enjoy your time with him. I have never seen halter horses in their 20s. You arent even 100% sure of his age and he could be older. Let him pretend to be a show horse at home. You will both be happier and you wont be dissapointed by the judges. Also exhibitors are NEVER to talk to the judge in the ring unless the judge asks you a question in which case you may answer. Otherwise you need to wait till the show is over and ask the steward to talk to the judge. Have fun with your filly at the show instead.[/SIZE]

Lyn
 

ChrystalPaths

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2003
Messages
8,277
Reaction score
1
Now Desiree, remember we are trying to help you AND Midnight.

Jane (rabbitsFizz) and Marty and Lyn are SO right.

This a senior gentleman who really needs to be treated as such. I'm 50 and if you asked me to do all you are asking him, I'd do my best just because you asked and you care for me but later on it would hurt me. I promise you we are correct.

He needs a superior senior feed. We love Equine Senior by Purina Mills but there are other fine products out there. At his age he is NOT going to look like the younger guys kicking butt. You may very well be the only horse in senior stallion of your height group. Is winning a ribbon so important? I think you should show if it is your passion but perhaps another horse?

The senior horses have earned the right to live life to the fullest just grazing and being loved. Just my humble opinion but he feels like he is trying to please you and not himself to me. He is a very pretty boy even with the pics. Do increase his feed, he needs it to maintain his health and well being if you want him around for another 10 yrs.

Nuf said I'll be quiet now. Best wishes to Midnight.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

RobinRTrueJoy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
2,441
Reaction score
1
Get his teeth checked, worm him every 6 weeks, and start him on Equine senior pelleted diet. Maybe add some corn oil, definitely give vitamins and make sure he is on electrolytes. Summer AND winter.He needs some weight on.Being dehydrated a bit will make him look thinner. Electrolytes will hydrate him, plump his look up a little, and make him drink more. Perhaps he worries the weight off by running the fence near his mares? He is an older gent and needs to be treated differently than the younger horses. He has earned it.
 

remington

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
86
Reaction score
0
I am no pro, but I will give you my first impressions.

I believe he is quite underweight...that was my very first impression.

But, aside from that I have several positive things to say. I like his topline it is nice length and his tail is set how I like it. His neck ties in fairly high into his chest. His overall shape is square and balanced. His neck is nice (although very thin). To me his head seems a bit large, but that may just be an illusion because the rest of him is thin.

I think an overall nice horse who just needs some groceries. (Equine Senior is great stuff).

How is his coat? Is it brittle and dull, or soft and flexible? Good feed may help that too.

How old is he?

Best of Luck in your endeavors.
 

Latest posts

Top