I am just about ready

Miniature Horse Talk Forums

Help Support Miniature Horse Talk Forums:

Jess P

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2004
Messages
1,786
Reaction score
0
Location
New Hampshire
And to think geldings are calm. My gelding, Dusty has been with us for 5 years. He was my first mini and I was really excited to show him. I had no idea what I was doing, (I didn't know I had to do a pattern for showmanship), but that got me liking it even more. Before his first show we clipped him for the first time. It took us three days (bad clippers) and he flinched a bit on the ears, but we got it done. This year he started freaking out. I needed to clip him a lot for the shows. But it was difficult to get at his ears. He actually sprained my mom's thumb. I have been working with him EVERY day. Holding the clippers on his face, praising him. I would slowly move up, praise him and so on. However, when I get to his forehead he starts rearing, lunging at me and trying to bite. This is not a fear response.

Dusty is very smart. He learns quickly, so if he finds a way to get away from something, he does it. He thought he could push into me to knock me over to get away (I didn't let him, I pushed right back). He also learned that backing up into the cord will pull the clippers out of the plug.

Are there any trainers out there that know how to stop this? I have been seriously thinking about sending this guy off to get some manners, and driving training (he has gorgeous movement
). I am not one to give up, I do not believe in it, but really, I do not want to get hurt by this guy.
 

justaboutgeese

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2005
Messages
1,038
Reaction score
0
Location
ontario canada
Twitch, Not all animals get used to clipping. You can continue to condition him and over time he might permit it. But when it comes time to get it done now use the twitch. Better than risking injury to you, your helper or your horse.
 

Jess P

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2004
Messages
1,786
Reaction score
0
Location
New Hampshire
Oh yes, I forgot to add. He likes the twitch and we got one this year. The first time we used it he did well. Second time, he did not respond to it.
 

susanne

dB
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
5,285
Reaction score
314
Location
To your left
Awhile back someone mentioned using a hairdryer to desensitize a horse to clippers.

This summer, Mingus took a sudden dislike to ear clipping. Since he's very responsive to clicker training, I combined that with rubbing the clippers (turned off) on his ears, then turning the clippers on but just holding them against his ears, then finally clipping for very brief moments. Finally he realized that they were not going to eat him and we got the job done. (An aside: Marie -- aka Shortpig -- thought that the bad fly season that we've had may have sensitized him to things buzzing around his ears.)

Another thing you might try are the Wahl battery-powered small clippers that are very quiet. I think they run about $19 or so...
 

Littleum

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 24, 2003
Messages
650
Reaction score
0
Since it's just his ears, have you made sure he doesn't have any crusty scabs, owies or yuck-yuck in there? That can make clipping very painful for the poor guy.

If he's flailing and struggling to the point that you're really afraid one or both of you will get hurt, and you're unable to restrain him effectivly, go the chemical route. Have the vet draw up a nice little cocktail for the pony and clip quick.

You can (and in my book, should) try and work with him for the time being. Often they do improve when they learn they just can't win.

I *have* met horses who simply can't tolerate clippers and never improve sensative skin, bad past experiences, just plain hate them... they don't really improve and it's just kinder to zonk them out. One of the Olympic 3day horses (Binko? Bilko?) could NOT be clipped without being drugged- it's not always a horsemanship or handling issue, sometimes it's just a mental block for the horse.
 

bfogg

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2002
Messages
1,751
Reaction score
0
I have found that many horses become unmanageable to clip because they have been burned with clippers. People do not realize that the blades get so hot because they test them on their hands which are used to heat. Always test your blades on your inner forearm.

I will not clip a horse without 5 sharp blades letting one cool off in bladewash while using the others. I am not saying you did this miniseasons but obviously something turned him off clipping his ears.

Justaboutageese is right,twitch him but make sure to give him a nice noserub and a treat afterwards if this is not working see your vet and get him to give him a little something to take the edge off.

Good luck,

Bonnie
 

minih

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
3,085
Reaction score
13
I want to mention that when you twitch the only way it will work is if you use the twitch before they get all worked up and excited. If you use them then it is too late.
 

nootka

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
7,547
Reaction score
0
Bonnie's right, the horse may have inadvertently been hurt by the clippers and so that is what he associates it with.

Burning will get them (always stop and clean and cool your clippers every 3-5 minutes while clipping) also if you make a goof and cut them w/the clippers (it CAN happen, esp. around areas with loose skin or edges just like ears), it will take them a LONG time to forget about that.

I would use the twitch, myself, and not get hurt. I have a nice scar on my chin/lip from not using my own advice as far as the twitch.

If you are afraid of him, you might be wise to have him evaluated by someone w/more experiencing and "bags of tricks" training wise (check your references, though, he doesn't need more problems than he has), and possibly selling him to someone that gets along better w/him. It does not sound like you are giving up, you are admitting you are at a place where you both need help and that's a great thing to realize, for both your sake.

Good luck in finding the right solution!

Liz M.
 

Miniv

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
12,747
Reaction score
680
Bonnie and Liz took the words right out of my mouth......

In a previous clipping, the blades may have been too warm and you may not have realized it.

Basically, you are looking at starting from scratch desensitizing him - twitch if necessary - and praise/treating him for every little step forward he takes.

Good luck with him,

MA
 

Shari

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2003
Messages
5,676
Reaction score
132
Location
Now in Virginia
susanne said:
This summer, Mingus took a sudden dislike to ear clipping. Since he's very responsive to clicker training, I combined that with rubbing the clippers (turned off) on his ears, then turning the clippers on but just holding them against his ears, then finally clipping for very brief moments. Finally he realized that they were not going to eat him and we got the job done. (An aside: Marie  -- aka Shortpig -- thought that the bad fly season that we've had may have sensitized him to things buzzing around his ears.)

468261[/snapback]

Susanne you beat me to it. Clicker training will work wonders.

http://www.angelfire.com/az/clickryder/home.html

http://www.theclickercenter.com/

Everyone has given the same advise I would have,, so I will not add more.
 

Marty

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
13,596
Reaction score
520
Location
Tennessee
1. You may have gotten the clippers too hot and may have burned him in the past

2. The blades were dull and pulled his hairs

3. The twitch was not on tight enough

4. He has bug bites inside his ears making them sore to the touch.

5. Invest in battery operated mustache clippers. At any drug store or Walmart. They are very tiny, cut closely, fit perfectly right inside the horse's ears, and are very very quite. Mine love them.
 

susanne

dB
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
5,285
Reaction score
314
Location
To your left
5. Invest in battery operated mustache clippers. At any drug store or Walmart. They are very tiny, cut closely, fit perfectly right inside the horse's ears, and are very very quite. Mine love them.
Definitely -- I forgot to add that one, but I found a Conair mustache/beard trimmer at Grocery Outlet for $10...it works great, and is good for all sorts of last minute touch-ups
 

Jess P

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2004
Messages
1,786
Reaction score
0
Location
New Hampshire
Thanks for your suggestions. We went out and bought a cheap men's mustache trimmer. Because he was freaking out even with that, we taped it onto an old halter, put it on him. Took a longe line and attached it to him. We then turned it on and let him run it out. After he got his main surges out of him, we let him settle with it on and gave him a treat and pet him. He is doing a bit better already.
 

Latest posts

Top