Silly me...I thought this practice was just

Miniature Horse Talk Forums

Help Support Miniature Horse Talk Forums:

nootka

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
7,547
Reaction score
0
At a recent show, I was in the ring listening to some chit chat waiting for my class, and I overheard something somewhat disturbing:

What the gist of it was that this horse, who was with a trainer, was growing too much as a yearling, and so the trainer was withholding feed to keep them smaller and in their size class.

Number 1: I thought this did not work, and a person could see that this horse was underweight, though it did place fairly high over horses with better condition.

Number 2: Is it really worth a few local ribbons (or any, for that matter) to keep your horse on the skinny side and risk their development?

Number 3: I thought it would not stop them from ultimately reaching the height they would, anyway.

Number 4: What trainer would really DO this?

*sigh*

I had heard of this practice before I even got into Miniatures, and I figured it was done by the ignorant to try and dupe someone unsuspecting, but this has me puzzled.

The trainer is a fairly well known one and has National titles. For the most part, their horses look good, but there was a fair number of them at this show that looked rather slack to me, and might have been up against the height limitations for their age, now that I gave it some thought.

Liz M.
 

Pepipony

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2004
Messages
1,784
Reaction score
0
Location
Donie TX
When I was showing stock horses it was common to withhold feed for a few days before a show( WP especially). I never did, didnt feel the need to, kinda thought that was what training was for LOL

Dont know why people would think it would help with growth to withhold feed, dont think it really would matter unless it was to the point of malnourishment.
 

Bess Kelly

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 24, 2003
Messages
2,298
Reaction score
34
Those handlers should have a few meals withheld from THEM!!

If done for a period of time, it can stunt them. Sometimes it is for a time until they do receive full nutrition and then they spurt. It is a bad practice for a young horse as it compromises their full development, health, immune system, etc. And, we all know what malnutrition does at various ages.

Many people confuse thin with refined -- as we've discussed before -- but, a trainer knows the difference!! Only the individual in charge of feeding could tell you for certain what the truth of the matter happens to be.
 

Marty

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
13,596
Reaction score
520
Location
Tennessee
You know what?

We all know that some trainers will resort to anything to win be it abuse, over work and what now, starvation?

Stuff like this makes it hard for a good honest trainer to make a living.

People get to wonder just who they can send their horses off to without worry.

Those trainers that do this sort of disgusting stuff as well as resorting to any other low down methods need to be EXPOSED for the pond scum that they are. I'd like a go-round with the person who does that. Just lock me in a room for 30 seconds or less with her. Yalls can have what's left.


I sure hope somebody has the courage to rat-fink on the trainer that does this and blow her out of the water.
 

capall beag

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 20, 2005
Messages
2,137
Reaction score
0
Location
York Beach, Maine originally from Ireland!
Sick and disgusting!

Some people must have very sad existences when they need to inflict cruelty unto a helpless creature to boost their pocket or their ego by winning a colored piece of ribbon.

Someone doing this may look good on the outside but they are rotten on the inside.

Shame on anyone who would put their desire to be the BEST ahead of their animals wellbeing.

What goes around comes around. I hope this trainer gets what is coming to him.

The sad part is this is just the tip of the iceberg, if you will starve a horse to win just think about what other things you would do.

Making an animal suffer in the name of PROFIT is cruelty at its finest.
 

shminifancier

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2004
Messages
1,232
Reaction score
0
Location
Western Wisconsin
Different practices like this is what has soared me from showing..People will go to all extremes just to get a ribbon.. Nope not for me I quit showing many years ago because of things like this going on in every breed...I will not partake.
 

Devon

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2004
Messages
4,323
Reaction score
0
Location
Ontario
hmm...I dont agree with that...its unatural anyways oyu arnt honestly winning thoase ribbons...
 

Marsha Cassada

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2005
Messages
8,517
Reaction score
5,163
Location
Southwest Oklahoma
It is a felony to abuse a dumb animal. They are called "dumb" because they cannot cry for help. Starving a young creature to keep it small seems abusive to me. After they have ruined its health for a few kudos, they will pass it on to somebody else who will have vet bills and heart break. Perhaps the trainer is not the only one at fault, though. What about the owner? Perhaps the owner's instructions are to win at any price. I know some of us get too sentimental about our animals, and maybe lose sight of reality a little. But, wihtholding food because of health, such as founder recovery, is one thing; starvation for vanity seems like abuse. If a human adult wants to abuse his body to compete for a prize, that is one thing. But to manipulate a weaker, or dependant creature is rightly considered BAD. Whereever there is conpeition, there will be abuse. We can't stop it, but we can't become desensitized to it, either.
 

nootka

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
7,547
Reaction score
0
I agree, Marty, it is difficult to know who to safely send a horse to.

I have observed for many years at our local shows and while I tend not to believe "gossip," I have to go w/what I see and how it will affect the horses I send out. I have already made one error that will never be repaired completely in this dept.

Also, I wanted to clarify, I don't think they were out and out "starving" the horse, but they were definitely trying to keep the horse smaller by feeding less, and the horse DID look quite thin, though one could not see its ribs easily, there was that "slack" look I call it, where the croup is pointed and the muscles are concave rather than convex in that area also over the withers.

Just, to me, not what the judges are looking for in the show ring today.

When I first began showing back in '97, I DID see this being rewarded (that thin/faux refined look). I also followed this trend somewhat, trying to keep my horses right on the edge, but realized the error in this rather quickly.

I just kinda thought this practice had gone the way of the wind, as the horses I see winning today actually have a nice layer of fat over the muscles, in peak condition.

I am sure this horse was eating, it just wasn't getting what it probably should have for its stage of growth. I had expected more from a Nationally titled trainer is all.

Liz M.
 

wildoak

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
4,563
Reaction score
23
Location
Texas
The trainers I've personally dealt with do feed their horses up - a horse who is underfed generally isn't going to show as well. They need to be in the peak of health and just popping with energy to have that "look", something you don't get by underfeeding. Surprising to hear that a pro is underfeeding, but I don't see a trend in that direction. Too many nice horses in great condition out there competing.

Jan
 

Mercysmom

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2003
Messages
1,014
Reaction score
1
Location
New York
I have heard of folks doing this but can't believe that a win means that much to some people to compromise a horse's health. Then again, we have human supermodels that are starving themselves for the money... very sad.

Mine are all well fed and Mercy has been referred by fellow competitors as "that fat black and white horse that can jump" in the past. Well, she might sport a little bit of pudge - (having a few babies does that to a body), but she usually sports the blue or red ribbon when the hunter and jumper classes are done.


Doc says she is healthy as is attested by her shiny coat, bright eyes and good muscle tone - she was leased this summer by a 4H group that kept her very well conditioned by running her daily behind a Gator, so maybe my hubby will have to get a Gator or golf cart and run both Mercy and I behind it!

She won't let me get away with not feeding her... nor will the rest of the horses. Odyssey drums a foot on her food dish until the grain appears, Indy and Finisterre both "smile" (they trained ME well) with their upper lips, Freedom paces and Mercy will pick her feed pan up and throw it at me.


Denise

Silversong Farm
 

Latest posts

Top