New to mini horses, lots of questions!!

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little lady

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You need to get xrays to correctly determine what is going on and then create a plan of action. Laminitis or founder is very serious but can be managed.
 

freedomnjustice

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I did not feel his hooves because I didn't know to do so. I just wrapped them like the vet said to do. She did come the next day and felt his feet and said she was feeling for a pulse - I do remember that. When I talked to her earlier this week, she said that she didn't think the bone had sunk down. She mentioned x-rays but didn't say for sure if she was going to have them done or not.

I asked about returning him and previous owners said no. I made a mistake with him yesterday and paid for it. I was trying to see if he'd let me feel his legs, and he kicked me. I mean hauled off and kicked the crap out of me. It was my fault, I wasn't standing where I was supposed to be and I was just pushing my luck, I guess. I'm just glad it wasn't my kids. My husband says we need to ship him down the road. Who's going to buy a sick horse? And one who kicks, at that, but I guess all horses kick if put in the right (or wrong, however you look at it) situation. I wish I knew how to handle all of this. I'm now scared to go into the pen with them and I'm so frustrated with everything. Tomorrow we are supposed to remove the pads on his feet, and how am I supposed to do that if he is going to kick? I feel like I take a step forward and it's three steps back. I'm beginning to think this whole decision was a terrible idea and now I'm stuck.
 

disneyhorse

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Do you have someone knowledgeable about horses to help you? I've rescued a few minis from owners who became scared of the little guys and the horses quickly took advantage of the situation. Being stallions doesn't help the situation, and being in pain also will contribute. There is a reason the vast majority of stallions are gelded!

Your safety comes first, so get a horse person ASAP to help you! There is nothing like in-person help... We can only advise so much and explain so much with typed words.
 

Carolyn R

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I think you mentioned about a horse savvy family member that offered help if needed? Ask her for help.....I am sure your boy is experiencing some discomfort, but he may very well be playing you too. The sweetest of horses can turn into little demons if they are put into the wrong herd dinamics or know they can get away with something, add in irritability from an injury and it makes for quite a furry little beast. It does not mean it has to happen again, it just means you need to take the role as alpha mare and not put up with it. I think many of us, even those that have come from big horse back ground, were sometimes afraid we would break our precious little porcelain ponies.....truth is they won't break and they will quickly turn into little monsters if not put in their places. I know the last thing you need to hear is something that will require more vet care, but I am all about the gelding too, even if there are no mares around. Geldings make for calmer more level headed pets. take a deep breath, have someone at his head and stay to his side when checking his legs and feet, if he steps into you like he is trying to position to kick, don't be afraid to push off into him to make him move over. A swat with a crop when he encrouches on your territory wil have him mind his space also. Believe it or not, I am sorry he may or may not feel good, but his testing boundaries after a week of ownership is pretty typical of horses. If he was recently dosed with meds (likean hour or two before) chances are, any pain sensation should have been mild, and he was acting out. if you think I sound cruel, pull up some footage of horses establishing pecking order, I gaurantee a swift swat with a crop is nothing compared to kicking and biting they bestow onto one another.

Everyone starts somewhere with ownership, try not to get overwhelmed. Get a horse person to give you a few pointers, get him over the current hump, then please consider gelding them and possibly getting involved with a local mini or equine group so you have a support system. We all get discouraged at some point, hang in there it will pass.
 

Matt73

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So frustrating to read this. I wish you were having an easier time. That seller was very irresponsible to sell two stallions to a buyer with little to no experience with horses. I hope you get the help you need.
 

MyMiniGal

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I just wanted to let you know, that as for being scared now, I know how you feel. My horse reared and blew up, with someone else, where I had her boarded before. So, I was very nervous around her after that. God stepped in and had a mini horse friend and place literally land in my lap, and I am getting the help and support I needed, and we are making strides by leaps and bounds now. I'm so sorry you got kicked. I agree with other's, as in getting someone who know's horses to help you. Would be great, if they especially knew mini's. I sure wish you hadn't had to go through all of this. Owning mini's should be a joy, not a hardship. Am sure praying for you.
 

Jean_B

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Glad you got the vet out. If newly foundered, having him stand in a bucket of cold water will help keep the heat down in those feet and help to alleviate some of his pain. Bute is an anti-inflamatory and will help keep the heat and pain level down.....HOWEVER.....it must be used sparingly or it will create ulcers. If using Bute at all - ALWAYS use Gastroguard to help prevent ulcers (minis are more prone to Bute-induced ulcers than big horses). Most vets don't think to prescribe it but I firmly believe it is an essential when using Bute.

Once you get his founder under control - have an experienced farrier inspect those feet to see how much white line or hoof wall separation there is. This will also help you in determining whether or not he can EVER be allowed back on grass. Some bad founder cases must remain on dry lot the rest of their lives, because once they founder....they do it easier the next time.

I don't use the string hay bags - too easy for a horse to get a hoof/leg tangled.

But kicking is a definite no-no under any circumstances and he now knows he has you bamboozled. Like the others said, you need some experienced person to get you through this. You can do this with some help in getting his health...and his head....straightened out.
 
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Marty

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I have a question about the founder/laminitis. I spoke with another horse owner this evening and she said that once the horse has foundered, he's foundered for life. She said he may have better days than others, but he will always be lame and we will always have to treat it (medically) and it's something we will battle his entire life. I don't mind managing his food and stuff like that, but is this something that will be costing money his entire life and multiple vet visits, etc.??

If he is full blown foundered, this is pretty much accurate. I also put down my quarter horse gelding because of founder. We battled for a year and it was an uphill battle. As far as multiple vet visits, once you get a handle on what has to be done, you'll be able to proceed without a vet there all the time. You'll have to manage his pain which is the biggy in my humble opinion If he's lame, he's in pain. If he were mine, he'd never see a blade of grass again. I'd also encourage you to start him on Probios and no way on the hay bag. I am so very sorry you are going through this. I sent you a pm.
 

REO

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Glad you got the vet out. If newly foundered, having him stand in a bucket of cold water will help keep the heat down in those feet and help to alleviate some of his pain. Bute is an anti-inflamatory and will help keep the heat and pain level down.....HOWEVER.....it must be used sparingly or it will create ulcers. If using Bute at all - ALWAYS use Gastroguard to help prevent ulcers (minis are more prone to Bute-induced ulcers than big horses). Most vets don't think to prescribe it but I firmly believe it is an essential when using Bute.

Once you get his founder under control - have an experienced farrier inspect those feet to see how much white line or hoof wall separation there is. This will also help you in determining whether or not he can EVER be allowed back on grass. Some bad founder cases must remain on dry lot the rest of their lives, because once they founder....they do it easier the next time.

I don't use the string hay bags - too easy for a horse to get a hoof/leg tangled.

But kicking is a definite no-no under any circumstances and he now knows he has you bamboozled. Like the others said, you need some experienced person to get you through this. You can do this with some help in getting his health...and his head....straightened out.
Very good post Jean! I very much agree!
 

Marty

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My old quarter horse gelding Sonny has laminitis. He had an attack about 4 years ago. I still have no idea why but one morning I went to let him out of his stall and he couldn't move and i new right away that was the problem. It was winter so it could have been from the morning dew on the grass because my husband was letting them out too early or perhaps I gave him too much beet pulp and elevated the sugars in his diet, I have no idea but His feet were on fire. I went through the first aid steps of soaking in cool water 3 times a day, 15 minute intervals or so, bute daily for 5 days, Probios daily and tagamet daily and no grass. I had a Natural Barefoot Trimmer en route from the other part of the state immediately so we got him stablized right away. I also purchased special Boa boots from www.easycareinc.com and he was fine and running in a matter of days. Cost a lot of time and money but he's never been lame a day since. If you catch it in the very early stages like this and do right, you have a very good chance at recovery.
 

freedomnjustice

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Hi all, I don't have a lot of time to write as I'm on my lunch break. Freedom seems to be doing better with his feet. I stopped the Bute Monday night and he doesn't seem to be in any discomfort. We are going to try to get the pads off his feet tonight-we didn't get the chance last night with family obligations.

I have help on the way as far as behavior issues!!!! She is coming next week to show me the ropes and she used to be a professional race horse trainer. She is currently the director of our local humane society. Thank you Lord for answering this prayer and thank you all for praying!! I will update soon.....
 

MyMiniGal

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Was really curious about how things are going for you, now? Was thinking about you today, so went looking to see if there was a recent update.
 

Boss Mare

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Am curious how all is going too. Don't get too discouraged. Horses are a lot of joy, yet a lot of work, sweat and tears and just about everything inbetween - hang in there!!
 

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