Why are stallions so hard to sell??

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minimayhem

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I could get a buyer quick on a mare or gelding. Why do stallions seem so much harder??

I personally think stallions get a bad wrap in some peoples eyes.

Does anyone else have this dilemma??
 

Sunraye Miniatures

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Reason I think is because there are so many people out there selling so many stallions. Also people sole search for that perfect stallion.
 
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kaykay

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i think because there are simply WAY TOO many stallions. Also prices in general are down a bit so that doesnt help. When i first got in minis you could not buy a breeding age stallion that was stallion material for under 5000.00 now you see them all the time for 2000.00 or even less. The only horse ive ever had trouble selling is my current stallion for sale. He has a wonderful pedigree, show record, foals on the ground and although ive had a lot of nibbles no sale yet. Also i know its my fault for not having better pics of him. Hes a very small stallion and its hard to get a good pic of him as i dont have anyone here to help. A great picture makes a huge difference.
 

minimayhem

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I realize many people are searching for that perfect stallion. I hope everyone finds what they are searching for. I haven't shown my stallion, but he does have a decent lineage. He's produced beautiful babies...and since I must get rid of all my horses the price is next to free and yet NOBODY that's written wants him at almost a freebie.

Kay, I hope you sell your stallion to a wonderful home cause I know that's always #1 priority.

Take Care and thanks to you that responded.
 

Leeana

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They reason we were not really interested in the stallion was because my dad doesnt like stallions bc they are so hard to train. I like stallions but i grew up being told 'you cant trust them' by my parents. Also it costs way to much to get them gelded up here + the drive to the vet is pretty far unless you want to pay extra to get the vet out here.
 

Jill

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There are just too many stallions, most of whom are not stallion quality.

A person can have as many foals as they want each year from just ONE stallion, so there's not a huge demand to have many stallions for most farms.

The good news is, if you could sell a gelding easy, you can turn a stallion into one! It seems like quality geldings are bringing more respectable prices than they used to... still not what I hope we will see one day when mini people realize that not every horse needs to reproduce.
 

MeadowRidge Farm

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I dont have a problem selling stallions at all. I have actually sold more stallions then mares, including 4 stallions this year, 2 of which were breeding stallions, and a yearling colt. It seems more people want stallions from me then mares..but I do have to admit I very seldom offer a mare up for sale. I never have to advertise my horses either, its usually by word of mouth, and I have also helped a friend sell quit a few of hers this year. maybe its our area...minis arwe FINALLY starting to gain in popularity. Corinne
 

lyn_j

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[SIZE=14pt]I sold one stallion this year for 1500 less than what I paid for him but he still brought over 1000. IF they are quality animals and people know that then they sell. Problem is stallions are a nickle a dozen out there. Yes they are cute and yes they are little but they are still stallions and should not be just pets. I bet if you gelded him you could sell him in a heart beat.[/SIZE]

Lyn
 

YHFF Miniature Horses

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I don't have a problem getting rid of the boys either since I sell them for less than my girls . I've just got two stallions right know and this year all of our foals we're fillys (which of course are keepers
). Next year I'm hoping for some colts so I know I have to sell them, unlike fillys which I'm tempted to keep.
 

Relic

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Seeing as we're not allowed to keep geldings here we really haven't had a problem moving the stallions especially if they are weaners or yearlings the older ones bring more bucks but then they usually have driving going for them besides sperm. And anyone buying always gets a discount to geld if they want.

l never found stallions harder to train in fact l prefer them as they learn a lot quicker and in general are just a lot smarter then mares but yes you have to be on the ball around them but that's the neat part you have to also use your brain besides your time. l have no idea where people get these rank studs from unless there born and thrown out in the field and no one bothers to do anything with them except breed. So very sad for them and also sad at the number of people l've run across that are actually afraid of miniature stallions..
 

Shannon

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When we were searching recently for a stallion, we knew exactly what we wanted...and then we knew exactly what we wanted and could afford!!!
My dream stallion was $10,000 - yikes - but I was a little more realistic and found a beauty for 1/4 of that, and I'm very pleased.

I feel bad for the farms that have more boys than girls because it is harder to move them...because of the "stallion" rap that they get. Our stallion is a doll, but when he wants to breed, he wants to breed - normal!!! But he's also well behaved because we make him be. I have seen stallions that I would NOT even go in the pasture with. And housing is an issue, although I've heard of farms that have "bachelor" herds. I would prefer that to all my boys living alone, like they are now.

Personally, I think the boys are fun - they have great personalities, are mischeavous and I'd have a bunch of them.
 

minicuteness

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Jen,

When I did some checking on your stallion awhile back I see how his grandsire is a son of Roan Ranger!! I figure with that and a bit of firming up
he would make someone a great stallion.

Best wishes to you.
 

kareng

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I think the market in general is down. I just recently gelded a stallion due to space and hormone issues. I also have a colt and 3 fillies for sale - not much interest at all.

Good luck,

Kareng
 

minicuteness

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That could be true about the market, I know especially in Michigan. It seems ALOT of things are down..unfortunately!
 
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Lisa-Ruff N Tuff Minis

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I personally dont think it has anything to do with the bad rap of a stallion I think that more people are getting more picky with what they breed and how many stallions they own. I know i was on a search for the right one and he had to meet all my critera not just some of it- he had to be what I dreamed of and more

If you can sell him quickly as a gelding I say geld him then
 

Jill

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I think Lisa has a good point that people are getting pickier. I know over the years, I have gotten more so. Someone had a thread awhile back about why was the market slow (for geldings, mares & stallions), and my opinion is what Lisa said, that people are pickier these days. That is a GOOD thing especially when it comes to breeding animals.
 

Lauralee

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I am currently in the market for a stallion, and have been actively inquiring for about a month. I have probably made about 40 inquiries by email. There are VERY FEW stallions out there that meet my conformation criteria. Additionally, there are VERY FEW sellers that are willing to actually TAKE PICTURES of the conformation and send via email. Some won't answer specific questions. I simply CANNOT and WILL NOT purchase a stallion over the internet unless I can be sure, beyond any doubt, that the stallion is what I want. Stallions require far too much extra upkeep to add them willy nilly without seeing and knowing EVERYTHING in advance. Call me picky, but its MY hard earned money being spent. This gets very frustrating!
 

Mulligans Run

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I agree with Lauralee - sometimes getting questions answered is like pulling teeth. It's pretty frustrating, but how can you purchase something without having your questions answered.

And I'm glad too that people are getting more critical of the horses they are buying.
 

littlearab

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If I were you I would geld him and sell him that way.

Being a greatgrandson on who ever does not make him an showin for being sold as as stallion.

If he's a nice stallion.... he'll be a nice gelding.
 
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