Who needs a gate?

Discussion in 'Miniature Horse Photo & Video Gallery' started by Marsha Cassada, Nov 28, 2018.

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  1. Nov 28, 2018 #1

    Marsha Cassada

    Marsha Cassada

    Marsha Cassada

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  2. Nov 29, 2018 #2

    Cayuse

    Cayuse

    Cayuse

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    Where did the plate end up?
    He has an interesting face, his darker shadings exsensuate his eyes. I spelled that wrong I believe. À for effort?
     
  3. Nov 29, 2018 #3

    Marsha Cassada

    Marsha Cassada

    Marsha Cassada

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    I
    I picked up the plate and then he came through the gate. He wanted to be with dd badly, but wouldn't go past that plate. Yes, his coloring is unusual. I'm looking forward to seeing him clipped.
     
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  4. Nov 30, 2018 #4

    Marsha Cassada

    Marsha Cassada

    Marsha Cassada

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    Today a laid a magazine in the gate. The pages sort of moved. It took him about 20 minutes and then he did a flying leap through the gate so he could get to DD. What do you all think about doing something every day? I'm thinking of a weighted plastic bag tomorrow.
     
  5. Dec 1, 2018 #5

    secuono

    secuono

    secuono

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    I wouldn't want him to learn to jump scary things.

    Put him on a lead, bring him close to the new, scary item and let him check it out. Just don't get so close he pulls back, close enough he takes notice of it. Slowly get closer, then go to the other side of it. Touch it, let him touch it. When he's decided it's okay, lead him past it, but don't let him bolt by. If he doesn't want to, go back to introducing the scary item.

    Every scary item you help him calmly conquer will grow his trust in your decisions and over time, he should figure out to follow your lead and not worry about new, possibly scary things. At the very least, new items will be conquered more easily and quickly.
     
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  6. Dec 1, 2018 #6

    Marsha Cassada

    Marsha Cassada

    Marsha Cassada

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    Secuno, thank you for the suggestions. I am working with him on the scary things. I tried to lead him past the paper plate, but he wouldn't. I thought of putting molasses on a paper plate; what do you think of that idea? He is okay now to approach a plastic bag, but if it moves, he bolts. My thinking about laying the objects in the gate path is that he can check them out. If he gets past the object and it doesn't pursue or attack him, he will desensitize. I'm just trying different strategies. Everything new is a challenge.
    Today my sister brought out her little grand daughter to ride him. He has been ridden before but we did not know how he would react. He did fine. After riding, she did things like children do when they play with animals: she put the little orange cone on his head like a hat, for one. I had to hold him the first time, then he let her put it on his head and on his back. We did keep the lead rope on him when we let her ride him out of the corral, and that was good because he spooked at some ornamental grass and she fell off. I think he would have taken off if we hadn't had the lead rope because her falling would have given an extra startle.
    He is very sociable and nosey. This spooking thing is going to take some time and work.
     
  7. Dec 2, 2018 #7

    Marsha Cassada

    Marsha Cassada

    Marsha Cassada

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    When I got them out of the pasture this morning, I pulled a plastic bag out of my pocket. He let me rub it on his face but when I went for the neck he reared. He settled and I rubbed his neck. Then I laid it in the middle of the gate and he let me lead him out quietly. He walked around it, of course, but no bolting. As I was working with him, he saw it blow around the pasture and kept a eye on it. I really think it was okay to put the scary things in the gate entrance/exit. He saw that they just laid there and didn't bother him. Tomorrow I will do the magazine again and lead him over it.
     
  8. Dec 3, 2018 #8

    Cayuse

    Cayuse

    Cayuse

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    I have put spooky objects in the paddock and just turned them out with it. After a few days the object becomes just another part of their surroundings. I have tied pool noodles to the fence and hung a plastic bag here and there. Tarps I fold up and weigh down with a couple of 4x4s or something and just leave it in the paddock, usually in the center so they can either go near it or not at their choosing, I throw their hay near the tarp it so they get rewarded for standing by it, once they associate it with feeding time they are good with it. At that point I toss the hay on the tarp and let them eat off of it.
    The paddock always looks a little ratty, lol and I'm sure the neighbors wonder why I have strange stuff hanging off the fence all the time. It probably doesn't look so nice from their living room :(
     

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