What to do with Oliver?

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OhHorsePee

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Ron and I were discussing Oliver last night. We absolutely will keep him. He is not registered and has had a taste of honey. I say geld him because I am afraid when Lacey comes into heat he will tag her. Promise isn't registered either and we had discussed before just letting him be with her but I am one for gelding him. Here is my concern. When I was maybe 13 I helped to hold down a stallion to get gelded (regular sized horse). I still remember his scream!
Have they came up with a gentler way of doing it? I know that sounds stupid of me, but I love the little guy. I mean, does anyone see Oliver being a stallion a problem when Lacey comes in? I know she is only 5 months now, but I like to plan ahead and since fall is approaching I think it would be better to do it then. Please ease my mind a little here.

Thank you

Fran
 

Pepipony

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My Vets tranc them and use a local. I think things have come a very long way. But if in doubt, ask how your Vet does it.
 

Minimor

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I'm guessing that in the case of the big horse you helped with, they threw him & tied him up but didn't give him any anesthetic?? There are still people who geld horses that way. Unfortunately. I suggest that these people should have a similar surgical procedure done on themselves, without anesthetic, so that they can fully appreciate how the horse feels. Then perhaps they would change their methods!

Done properly, the horse will be sound asleep for the procedure, and will not scream...the vet puts the horse "out", performs the surgery, wakes the horse up. Sure, the horse has some pain afterwards, but not during. We had 4 done this year. The coming 2 year old was done in the winter and had no problems at all. The other 3 were 3 & 4 year olds done in the spring. They were all in pain & shaking about an hour after they woke up. I gave them each a small dose of banamine & they all bounced right back--as soon as the banamine took effect, they were fine, and the severe pain did not return even once the banamine wore off. They kept themselves exercised and had no problems with the incision closing up & getting infected.

Gelding is not a cruel procedure, or at least it shouldn't be!
 

Marty

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I mean, does anyone see Oliver being a stallion a problem when Lacey comes in?

Of course, he's a boy?

And if you do want to keep them together and do not geld him, all heck will break loose and someone is bound to get bred .

Gelding is not a tragic operation. Not to worry.

You won't have to help hold him down or anything like that at all.

Enter drugs!

Drugs are good!

The vet will give him a couple of shots of stuff so he doesn't feel anything.

He may lay down or the vet may do him standing up.

He will be in la la land and you won't be on the ground holding anything.

It's fast and easy, about 20 minutes or so, and he'll get up shortly after the procedure is finished and the drugs wear off.

He will be sore for a couple of days after that which of couse is expected.

The key is to not to lock him up, keep him moving around in a nice clean area, and as he walks he will drain. You may want to keep a cold hose on the insision to keep him from swelling up.

Then the vet will throw his meatballs up on your barn roof for luck. That's tradition!
 

justaboutgeese

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We have a Mennonite practitioner who does not tranquilize but even those horses do not scream. They throw the horse and lay across his neck and they are so concerned with not being able to flee that keeps them busy. By the time they figure out thats not the problem its over. I have watched several he has done and they actually seem to get over it faster than my horses did and the vet tranquilized them and used a local as well.
 

Jill

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Well, I have had 6 minis gelded. Four before they were yearlings, and then two senior show stallions early this spring. They were 4yo and 5yo.

The vet puts them out, they are asleep for the gelding. In only one case were there any complictions and (naturally) that was with my favorite horse in the world, Derby. He was 5 when he was gelded and he got up from being down too soon. He ended up bleeding and having to be packed, but he got pain meds and he really came through just fine. As a result of being packed he had to be on stall rest for a few days, which is opposed to them usually needing to be exercised a little. Even though it did not go totally picture perfect the first few days of gelding, I am very happy for me and for him that we went on and did it. He's even more wonderful now than he was before as a stallion.

If Oliver was mine, he would be gelded and as a result, he will actually end up having a happier, less frustrating life!

I'm a big fan of geldings, that is for sure. I'm "pretty sure" I'm going to be adding a gorgeous yearling BTU SON to my little herd and one of the first orders of business is having him GELDED!
 
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Relic

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Perhaps more men should be gelded using that method after all they'll get over it.
 

OhHorsePee

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Oh, thank goodness! I will never forget how they did it! They roped one leg and then pulled it out from under him. I cried when I got home and my brothers called me a "wuss." Course, they always called me a "wuss." LOL

Thank you. That does set my mind at ease. Now to work on Ron's. Mind that is.

Fran
 

rabbitsfizz

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Oh dear, what an awful thing to happen at such an impressionable age. Never fear, Vets have come a long way since then. With the greatest of respect, 'geese- which would you preferr- some guy lying on your neck or being unconscious??
I have so many colts gelded I cannot even remember- the first one was a Welsh colt that was the first horse I actually bought to train and sell. He was done standing up, as that was what they did then, but it was all over and done in minutes. My Vets always put them out on the floor and also give a local if needed (usually it's not) Again it is over and done in minutes and the horse is usually just starting to come round as she finishes up- she had a nasty experience when we did seven colts and a stallion all together and she judged the anaesthetic wrong- for half an hour my yard looked like Custer's Las Stand re-enacted by Hobbits!! Now she is extra careful- we can always put more in, after all. Do not fret about it- find a Vet you are comfortable with and tell them your fears- if they have him in to the surgery you do not even have to watch if you would rather not. He will be all the better for it- keeping two unregistered entires and A FILLY WILL END IN TEARS!!
 

Okie BB

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OhHorsePee said:
Ron and I were discussing Oliver last night. We absolutely will keep him. He is not registered and has had a taste of honey. I say geld him because I am afraid when Lacey comes into heat he will tag her. Promise isn't registered either and we had discussed before just letting him be with her but I am one for gelding him. Here is my concern. When I was maybe 13 I helped to hold down a stallion to get gelded (regular sized horse). I still remember his scream! 
  Have they came up with a gentler way of doing it? I know that sounds stupid of me, but I love the little guy. I mean, does anyone see Oliver being a stallion a problem when Lacey comes in? I know she is only 5 months now, but I like to plan ahead and since fall is approaching I think it would be better to do it then. Please ease my mind a little here.Thank you

Fran

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Take him to your Vet..Its More humane,they give him a local so it wont hurt so much..
 

backwoodsnanny

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We had a colt done last year who was one of my favorites I was as nervous as you about the procedure. My vet gave meds with a shot and in just a couple of minutes he was very sleepy at that point I left the barn vet said come back in 15 minutes when I returned the boy was on his feet still somewhat sleepy but a gelding. He gave me meds to give him in two hours and another dose at bedtime that night both by mouth. I did and by the next morning you would never know anything was done. He was done in his own stall on clean bedding and by the next morning was anxious to go out to play. We did keep him in his own paddock for a couple of days next to his friends for safety but truthfully there were no ill effects at all. IF anything he was sweeter than ever and could play with the girls about a month later. No unwanted babies no studly behavior just a sweet little horse to deal with. Depending on your housing situation gelding is a win win situation for the horse and the handler.
 

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