What is the first advice?

Discussion in 'Miniature Horse Forum' started by Zarah, Dec 5, 2018.

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  1. Dec 5, 2018 #1

    Zarah

    Zarah

    Zarah

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    I’m wondering what the first advice you’d give to someone looking for a place that would be suitable for miniature horses, and what would be the first advice on buying a miniature?

    One day I’d like to see about having the land and the miniatures.
     
  2. Dec 5, 2018 #2

    RebelZ

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    Firstly you’d either want very small paddocks with low sugar grass or yards/stables as miniatures are known for getting fat on air and are also prone to conditions such as laminitis and EMS. I’d say that’s the main thing, depending on what you plan on doin with them you may want to look for a place with hills, trails, shows nearby, etc. You’re going to need to monitor your minis weight very carefully and research signs and symptoms of the conditions minis are prone to. Also don’t get caught into the way of thinking that miniatures need less exercise than bigger horses, exercise lowers blood sugars, keeps weight off and is fun for the horses and you!
     
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  3. Dec 6, 2018 #3

    Ryan Johnson

    Ryan Johnson

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    Couldn't agree with RebelZ more. I would want somewhere to be able to lock them up in the event of laminitis or to restrict grass intake. A combination of small yards and paddocks works well here.

    The answer to question 2 really depends on you. Is the miniature for yourself ? For kids? What you are intending to do with the mini etc. Do you have experience with horses ?
     
  4. Dec 9, 2018 #4

    Zarah

    Zarah

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    I’m a total newby, but the smaller size of these horses seem more manageable that some huge horse. I would think kids would come visit. Posting this, it seems as if somewhat pets for adults. Is this bad?
     
  5. Dec 10, 2018 #5

    Marsha Cassada

    Marsha Cassada

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    Miniature horses are still horses. Yes, they are more manageable because of their small size. But they have temperaments just like big horses; not all are "kid" horses. They can live in small places, such as a town yard if your town allows it. Having one is fine, as long as he gets attention. You might look into finding a local club, and visiting with horse owners to get more care information. Every horse person has to start somewhere; we never stop learning. Having a miniature horse for a pet is perfectly fine!
     
  6. Dec 10, 2018 #6

    Ryan Johnson

    Ryan Johnson

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    Marsha has a good point in finding a local club so you can learn some basics.
     
  7. Dec 12, 2018 #7

    Zarah

    Zarah

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    Thanks Ladies. I’ll start looking around to see if there is a club that is around that has at least a few minis.
     
  8. Jan 6, 2019 #8

    Polkadots

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    Yes for sure keeping a Mini as a pet is fine - there are lots of people that just like to watch them out in the field and brushing a horse is definitely therapeutic for both the horse and human. You do need to be aware that horses are herd animals and are not really comfortable or happy completely on their own. This means if you only have one you need to be part of the herd and give them attention.
    Like any pet they have special requirements and as a good pet owner you need to make yourself aware of these requirements - feed, daily and annual care. This all comes to expense for you so be sure you can afford the expense before bringing your pet home.
    You need to know that although Mini's are very small they are also very strong! If you allow any animal to think they are the boss it will end badly for both you and them. Horses use very subtle means to establish who is top dog. When a dog growls at you it is easily seen as being aggressive. A horse uses a much more subtle method. They start out by just moving into your space. If you back away even just a step next time they will be a bit more aggressive until one day you are shoved out of the way or bitten or kicked. You think "where the heck did that come from?!" You taught them, albeit unknowingly, that they could treat you like they treat the underdog in the herd and this ends badly for both.
    All horses have a somewhat delicate digestive system because of the way it is put together. This is one of the most significant problems with horses that you, keeping one at home, need to be aware of and be able to recognize.
    Having a Mini as a pet is wonderful but you need to read and research and talk to knowledgable people such as your vet, local horseowners, feed retailers, to help both you and your new pet get along fine.
     
  9. Jan 7, 2019 #9

    Jan Hall

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    Hello all,

    I don't mean to hijack the thread, but what is "very small"? I am just getting ready to spend a considerable amount of money on doubling the size of my barnlot and coyote-proof fencing. The new lot will be about 1/3 acre. Is this too large for two 7-month-old minis? Thanks.
     
  10. Jan 8, 2019 #10

    Polkadots

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    It all depends on whether you want the area for feed or exercise. If you turn 2 Mini's out to eat at free will 1/3 of an acre will become a dry lot in no time! But it will make a great area for them to stretch, run and roll.
     
  11. Jan 8, 2019 #11

    Polkadots

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    The people don't necessarily need to have Mini's to be helpful. Mini's are pretty much the same as any horse or pony and have the same requirements (in relation to their size) in handling, care and feed. Any knowledgable horse owner can help you out. The advantage of talking to a 'club' is that you will get more rounded advice as you wouldn't have the knowledge to discern whether ONE person is giving you good advice or not.
     
  12. Jan 16, 2019 #12

    Michelle@wescofarms

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  13. Jan 16, 2019 #13

    ClaraN

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    Hi, I was just reading here and decided to create an account. I find this so interesting that a miniature might be possible in a suburb type setting if allowed by them. So a big back yard and something like one of these rent to own small storage buildings could be a “barn”? This is just a really neat idea to me.
     
  14. Jan 17, 2019 #14

    goatkisses

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    ClaraN, you'd want a solid structure of some sort that would be safe for minis. A lot of the small storage buildings aren't very strong. Even a mini horse could kick a thin shelter and injure themselves.

    A mini could work in a big back yard, but keep in mind that horses do best with another of their kind and two minis would turn a back yard into a dry lot and/or a mud pit pretty quickly. You'd have to consider manure removal, too. If you have a compost heap that might work, but I think some suburbs that allow horses require the manure to be removed from the property altogether. A friend of mine used a dumpster and had a refuse company remove it when it was full, but some refuse companies aren't doing that any longer.

    I like to give my minis as much space to roam as possible, without affecting their health. I have three paddocks. All total the mini area is about 2 acres. One mini has a smaller dry lot, I have a front paddock with minimum graze and then a larger area for graze and play.

    You will need dry storage for feed, hay and bedding. My three minis go through about 1/2 a large bale of hay every day during the winter. I store 50 bags of shavings in the barn for bedding and I keep the grain in my house to prevent spoilage and rodent issues.

    I don't want to scare you or deter you from getting minis, but it's important to know what you might be getting into.

    If you really want to check into it a good idea is to contact your town for zoning rules and regulations. One of my friends has an acre of land and the town wouldn't even allow her to have chickens. The minimum is five acres for that, which is kind of nuts. ;)
     
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