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What does OBO really mean?

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mgtman

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I see horses advertised for sale with a price and then after the price "OBO" which I know you realize stands for "or best offer". What does "or best offer" really mean. If you advertise the horse for $1,000 or "OBO" does that mean that if someone offers you $50.00 and you get no other offers, you are obligated to sell the horse for $50.00? I know this is probably a dumb question but just wanted to know what other thought. Bob
 

Becky

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Personally, I believe it to mean 'or best offer the seller is willing to accept'. I would never expect someone to take the lowest possible offer I might make on a horse, although I have been pleasantly surprised before.
 

Candice

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I take it to mean they are conveying there is room for negotiation vs "firm". I think it shows that the seller is motivated and also that they're possibly not sure of the market. That is my interpretation anyways.
 

txminipinto

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I have a colt advertised that way. What it means is I'm willing to negotiate especially if it's show home. If you're interested in a horse that has OBO after the price, offer them a price! The worst that can happen is they say no, and then you negotiate!
 

Genie

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In my opinion it means "or best offer" with the condition being, that it's the best offer that I would be willing to accept.

If you have a horse for sale and you decide for some reason that you do not wish to sell to a particular buyer, I don't think you should HAVE to.

Interesting topic ....here's another scenario....

I would like to hear how a person would refuse sale of a horse when you know it's going to a home that is "knee deep" in manure through the winter stabling, and their horses are skin and bones and looking "wormy"....but..........the buyer is offering you exactly what you are asking????????
 

Songcatcher

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Interesting topic ....here's another scenario....

I would like to hear how a person would refuse sale of a horse when you know it's going to a home that is "knee deep" in manure through the winter stabling, and their horses are skin and bones and looking "wormy"....but..........the buyer is offering you exactly what you are asking????????
NO WAY JOSE!

Or if I really thought the buyer was well intentioned I might soften it a bit and reference the health concerns.
 

Suzie

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Interesting topic ....here's another scenario....
I would like to hear how a person would refuse sale of a horse when you know it's going to a home that is "knee deep" in manure through the winter stabling, and their horses are skin and bones and looking "wormy"....but..........the buyer is offering you exactly what you are asking????????

I reserve the right to sell my horses to the best home possible for the price I am offering. I have no problem telling them I "changed my mind" about offering the horse for sale. I have done it before and will do it again if necessary. Just because someone offers me the asking price does not mean I am obligated to sign a contract with them. I try hard to find out where my horses are going before I sign any paperwork with a potential buyer. I have been known to buy my horses back from a less than good home. One of the reasons we sell only a few each year and I never sell my mares anymore. You live and learn in this business. A private sale is not like a public auction. You do not have to hand your horse over to the first guy with the money in hand.
 

HGFarm

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Genie, I might kind of avoid the issue and tell them there is a 'sale pending' or something, or that there have been several inquiries before them and you are waiting to see what others before them are going to decide.... ??

Or, yes, you can just be up front and address the health concerns and conditions and just advise you would rather not subject your horses to that type of environment.
 

Jill

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To me, OBO means Or Best (Reasonable) Offer. And no, just because someone is willing to fork over the price I have on a horse does not mean they are qualified to buy one from me. If I don't think the horse will be in a good situation with the potential buyer, then the horse will not go from me to that perspective purchaser. We're talking about living, feeling creatures not "objects" so there are conditions to any sale that goes through me.
 

Riverdance

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If I find that it is not a good home for a horse, I just let them know that the horse is not for sale to them. That it is not a good fit. You can not tell them that you changed your mind, because they are going to still see it on your sale page.

I do not care if they have offered full price or not, it is not fair to the horse. Either you are in this business for the love of the horses, or you are in it to make money. I love the horses!!
(would I like to make money? Who wouldn't, but the horses come first!!)

If they inquire as to why you will not sell to them, I am not afraid to tell them that rumor has it that they do not take proper care of their horses. If they hear that often enough, perhaps they will start to take care of them properly.

I have already compiled a list of farms that I would never sell to. Some I have bought from and others, friends have bought from. Not only is it important to care where your horses are going, but it is important that the farm you are buying from is taking proper care of them too!! I can not tell you how many horses I have recieved with long feet or are really underweight.
 

Genie

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If they inquire as to why you will not sell to them, I am not afraid to tell them that rumor has it that they do not take proper care of their horses. If they hear that often enough, perhaps they will start to take care of them properly.

I really like the way you worded that Riverdance, and it should get people thinking that they need to "clean up their act".

I too worry about where the horses go that I sell and even when I thought I knew people I had dissappointments.
 

R Whiteman

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I believe that most of the time it means the best reasonable offer lower than the listed price. It could however be the best price offered on the horse. If two or more parties were interested in the same horse then one or more could offer over the asking price to secure a purchase. Just some food for thought.
 

Betty B

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I have not really understood that term either. I know what it refers to but to me it is like saying you are putting a price on it but are willing to take less from the start. So i guess if that is what you are thinking then the term will work for you. I don't like to see it myself.

Wish they would sell hay that way.
 

MiniHunterHorseFan

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Example $1,000 OBO means to me the price range is around $1,000 so make a reasonable offer. You put a price in front of the OBO so the people have an idea of what you are looking for money wise. They usually will offer you a little less. And as for someone wanting to buy your horse and you decide not to sell it to them we've done that before. You are allowed to change your mind, after all it is your horse. Just tell them the truth, tactfully.
 

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