Warts on Nose

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littlesteppers

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One of my yearling fillies developed wats on her nose..I read several things..making them bleed, put wormer on them, put Iodine on them ..Casteroil..or just leave them alone..INPUT??
 

hhpminis

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You can leave them alone and usually they will go away on their own but what I do is pick them off when they are small. They may spread by doing this so dont be alarmed but then they go away quicker.

My vet says to squeeze then with a plier and that releases the virus and basically does the same thing but try to get a horse to stand still while you try to squeeze their nose with pliers! LOL
 

Erica

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Well several years ago we had a case of warts that went through a bunch of the herd. I have always heard that they pick them up in the soil ext........and it just sort of depends on the year and what is in the soil.

What I heard and do - is take something like a leatherman tool and pinch just a couple OFF and then throw that piece you pinched off in their food bucket and they will eat it and it will go into their system. Worked for me that year I had them and they went away quicker.

I have also heard that once a horse gets them they aren't suppose to get them again type of thing............I only had them that one year, but then I did just get a filly in this year who has since developed some on her and not another horse of mine has gotten any - so maybe that is the deal once they get them they don't again.
 
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Coventry Lane Farm

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Our vet gives them a shot and it drys up the wart and it falls off within a few days without plucking them off. The shot is made for warts for cattle and equine and we have not had any re-occurring or spreading with adminstrating the shot.

I know the dosage is very small, but I can't recall the name of the drug used off hand.
 

Marty

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Hey Christine, I just got rid of some on one of my mares. I think it's brought on by that rain we had. Some people connect them with a virus.Take a potatoe and cut it in half and rub them off. Then I just smeared some corona or aloe on it and it already healed up quickly in a couple of days.
 
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Range

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The young are more likely to get them than the older ones and I just let mine alone. They eventually went away. Picking them is painful for the horse and made mine a little shy of being touched on the nose.
 

Aggravation Acres

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Marty

My friend told me about using a potato. She said to cut a potato and rub it on the wart every day for 10 days. I just rubbed our filly's nose for about 4 days and when I looked at it on the 5th day it was gone and has not come back.


She told me one of the older horse owners told her about it years ago. She had bought a horse real cheap at an auction because it had a lot of warts on its nose. No one would bid on it, so it worked out real nice for her. Within 2 weeks it did not have any sign of anything on its nose.

Deb
 

chandab

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My yearling stallion had a few warts this spring. He got them a couple months after he came home and they went away on their own in about 4-6 weeks (I can't remember exactly, one day they were just gone). I didn't do anything, as he was really touchy about them, so I ignored them. He had 3 that I saw, one on his nose and two on his chin.
 

mizbeth

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I bought a little mare last year. She had them. When I saw her the first time some months before, she had them and so did her pasture mates. The owner said "oh they will go away on their own, it takes about six weeks". Not in hee case it didn't nor her pasture mates as I picked her up 2 -3 months after I first saw her and she still had them. Poor little thing had a LOT of them too! I then brought her home, isolated her, and called my vet who told me about the wart/mix/shot stuff. I did not use it, but when my equine dentist was here he simply took his surgical scissors out and snipped a couple of them off. They were all gone is a couple of weeks then.

I have asked some trainers too what they do about them, and they tell me the same thing. They snip them off with scissors or pinch/pull with their fingernails.

B
 
K

kaykay

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they are caused by the papillomas virus and they are very contagious. Most older horses dont get them because they probably already had them. Kinda like chicken pox once you get it most people are then immune. But it does live in the dirt once you have had it and that is why you sometimes see a horse come down with it the following year. we usually pinch them off and we too have found they dont get near as many this way.

Erica--that is interesting about putting the wart in the feed. My father in law once got a horrible case of poison ivy. His friend told him to eat one leaf and that would end his suffereing and he would never get poison ivy again. Kinda the same theory as yours that eating it makes the body immune. Well it worked on him but ive never been brave enough to try it
 

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