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CritterCountry

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Ok, I got new hay. There was no hay here and I got stuck with the only stuff available which was brown and junky. Probably no nutrition left in it. Sable is fat as a cow so I am not concerned with her caloric intake at this point.

However, since I got this hay (which could be a complete coincidence) Sable has been exuding this white snot from her left nostril and coughing a little. Knowing that sometimes dusty hay or nosing where you don't belong can bring up some respiratory reasctions, I left her outside and have been keeping an eye on it.

Well about 5 days ago it got really bad. It looked like she had homo milk with a slight yellow tinge coming out of her nostril. So I bought some penicillin and a needle and off to the barn I went.

Have I mentioned before that Sable is bad with needles? I have had vets give up on her and this is a mini! We had always done her in the neck and that never works, so I have been giving her shots in the rump instead, with my neighbour's assistance. The last time she got a shot of benamine, my neighbour and I wrestled her for 30 minutes. This time, I thought, well, she is mine, I have to do this myself. Hubby is totally useless when it comes to handling horses by his own admission, so I was on my own.

Sable and I were both shaking when it was over and I never did get the shot in after poking her 8 times. So I reluctantly called my neighbour over and after 45 minutes of wrestling, leaping, dodging and sidestepping, we got the shot in. Sable was a shaking wreck. I was a shaking wreck and the neighbour felt horrible. And we had to do this for a week.


Day two. We try again. I am supposed to give her a shot a day. I am thinking, there is no way we are going to do this every day. We wrestle again for an hour and half. Get the shot in finally. My neighbour and I nearly collapse with exhaustion. She tells me she can't do this anymore for fear of ruining Sable. She felt guilty but said if I absolutely can't do it alone, she will still come help. At this point I called the vet. Left a message, saying I can't use my mare for a pin cushion any longer.

Yesterday, no call back from the vet. Snot has mysteriously gone away.

Today, vet's receptionist calls back. Tells me if Sable's temp is normal (97.5 when I took it) then it is most likely a response to the hay or allergies? She said if it was a virus or bacterial infection she would spike a fever. She put me on the call list for when the vet is out this way next, but I told her it wasn't an emergency at this point.

Should I be worried this is something worse? Why is it only one nostril? I have checked her and it is not strangles. She has not been anywhere near any other horses either. I have had her almost three years and have never seen her have this issue even in the dustiest conditions.

Is there any other form of penicillin other than a shot I can give her if it comes to that again?
 
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RobinRTrueJoy

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Had foals like that with almost pus like"snot" (I hate that word) out of one nostril. One had a bad cough, the other a minimal cough. No fevers and were active and eating well, but the amount of goo out the noses and cough scared me. You know what fixed it? A human antibiotic ... Z-pack 2 pills (250mg each) first day and one pill a day for the next four days(Then I repeated the Z-pack, total of ten days.) Worked really well, and I used my prescription plan!! LOL!! Got a Dr. friend to write the prescription for me. Crushed the pills up and gave them by mouth.

Doesn't sound like an allergy to me. Would I listen to a receptionist? I don't think so.

But then, I am not a vet either.

Robin
 

barnbum

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It may be a sinus infection. Antibiotics in pill form are available. SMZs. Dissolve in warm water--add some Karo's Syrup and I bet she'll lick it out of a bowl.
 

muffntuf

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Next time you need to antibiotics - try the pill form, much easier! Barnbum has it right - liquify it! If you don't have Karo syrup - try yogurt, flavored, like vanilla. My horses are good about taking meds with yogurt. Bad with needles.
 

Genie

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Banamine can be obtained in powder form.(I think flunamix) or something like that.

My vet told me only to give it twice a day and for no longer than 3 days, reducing the amount each dose.

Also, septra is in pill form and can be syringed in the corner of the mouth for the antibiotic.
 
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whitney

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For the shots you HAVE to give yearly anyway try a metal clamp (home Depo) to twitch the upper lip. I have a gelding that was the same way. I finally resorted to the twitch and it works amazingly he almost goes to sleep, safer for me and him.

edited to add

NO I DID NOT HAVE A GELDING LIKE THAT! How does your vet do it hog tie him and lay him on the ground?

Can you build a cattle shoot?
 
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CritterCountry

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Thanks all for the advice. Genie I got your PM, thanks I will look into that.

I have no idea where to get any of this. I am in Ontario, so if anyone in Ontario can direct me on where to obtain oral antibiotics and the oral banamine without prescription from my doctor or vet (highly unlikely I could get this) that would be great.

Whitney we have tried lip twitches, ear twitching and chains over, under chins and gums. You twitch her and she goes even more nuts!
 
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wildoak

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If I get one like that I do everything possible to NOT give injections.
I give banamine by mouth, antibiotics by mouth whenever possible. My vet fortunately is wonderful with injections - she's pulled Coggins/done shots on horses I warned her would be serious trouble, she's so easy about it they rarely even react. I've watched, can't do it like she does.

Jan
 

Keri

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I have a mini that is terrible at getting shots! He'll make his butt steel in no time and leap all over. The best way we found was to put him in a trailer (2 horse straight load type) or some sort of chute so that he couldn't bounce around. It sounds mean, but maybe you can cross tie her and hobble her and try. Or tie her close to a corner in her stall, get a large peice or plywood and pin her in the corner. Then it'll be over quick. Be sure to give her lots of loves and treats so that she will hopefully "forget" the bad part of getting a shot. :DOH!
 

mini1

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This may sound silly and I have never tried it but what about using a topical numbing agent, such as Orajel. Just put a couple drops on the skin where you are going to give the injection. Keep the syringe/needle hidden from her so she doesn't see it. Move slowly and talk softly to her. You could also try putting a cloth over her eyes (tuck it behind the halter).

Kelly
 

Nostalgia

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Just info for all giving injectible Banamine... this is very dangerous in Miniature Horses (not sure about Shetlands). Banamine contqains a certain amount of bacteria - which grows in the top and inside the bottle - which is normally safe for any horse other then a miniature... if you have to inject (faster results) do so in teh hip only!!! The muscle in the neck of a miniature horse is not large enough (at times) to absorb the bacteria... so this creates the bacteria eating at the muscle - which works its way between the horses front legs and ultimately attacking the lungs and heart (also produces a lot of fluid which effects both areas). If given in the neck and a large knot appears followed by severe stiffness of the neck (from side to side and up and down) treat immediately! It is cureable (the drug company that makes banamine paid all my vet bills and for research - about $15,000) but most vets aren't aware of this since it is only in miniature horses - I know of four horses that have died from this... so please use oral (uness immediately needed and then use in the hip only). Do You Know that you can give injectible banamine orally???? Yes, use the same amout but insert in the mouth (it kind of tastes like straight vodka lol don't ask). I takes longer to "kick in" but is the safest :)

Natalie
 

CritterCountry

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I have a mini that is terrible at getting shots! He'll make his butt steel in no time and leap all over. The best way we found was to put him in a trailer (2 horse straight load type) or some sort of chute so that he couldn't bounce around. It sounds mean, but maybe you can cross tie her and hobble her and try. Or tie her close to a corner in her stall, get a large peice or plywood and pin her in the corner. Then it'll be over quick. Be sure to give her lots of loves and treats so that she will hopefully "forget" the bad part of getting a shot. :DOH!
I have actually thought of this. This is the only solution I can find. I have a stall that I can lean over the wall and get her with, but alone it may be dicey. I will just have to get oral everything unless I have to, and then we'll have to close her in as you suggested. What a PITA. LOL :DOH!
 

Reijel's Mom

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I could be wrong (I REALLY could be!) but I thought I remember reading once that an old time way of putting a horse down was giving it penicillin in a vein.

If that is at all true, giving a penicillin shot to a crazed horse might not be a great idea, because I'm sure you're not able to draw back out to see if you've hit a vein or not.

I know that's not what you're asking but better to be safe than sorry.

And I'd be concerned about colic with feeding bad hay.
 

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