Terminology when describing offspring

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lotsofspots

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I have always wondered why horses are described this way....how is it possible that an offspring can be anything BUT a "direct" daughter or son or an "own" daughter or son?
 

Kitty

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I do write this sometimes because the registered name will not give you a idea who the bloodlines are.

A example. Zephyr Woods Da Yooper. This is a Champion Farms Nighthawk son. But you can't tell it by his name. And a nice quality guy like Yooper deserves people to know who his daddy is. But Nighthawk in the title would have ruined his name in my opinion.

Just my thoughts
 

lotsofspots

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But why not just say So-and-so is a "son" of Such-and-such, as opposed to saying So-and-So is a "direct son"....what is the difference? A son is a son is a son
 

Vertical Limit

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This topic has come up a number of times. I agree....it's a real GRONER! Who elses son is it going to be?
If you are an Indirect son.....are you adopted?
Own daughter? LOL Yep, very funny.

But a lot of Quarter Horse people will refer to horses like this. My small animal vet was a QH person and I use to jab him all the time. But....... to each his "own"
....it's kind of silly to me. I guess if you want to call your foal and Own Son or Daughter it's your perrogative.

Just very strange terminology in the horse World I come from. Again, just don't know whose son or daughter it would be if it wasn't a "direct" or "own".
 
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lotsofspots

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Thanks, Carol. I have always just wondered about this and have never had the time to really post....it's raining again here so had some time to "play."
 

Vertical Limit

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Hi Barbara,

Raining here too! Would rather be in the pool! Oh well. Anyway, we have had some really fun threads on screwy terminology. But as always, what's screwy to one can be perfectly normal to others.
 
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Magic

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Some people will advertise a horse that is linebred and has 50% of his genetic makeup (supposedly or theoretically) from a certain horse, for example if a mare and stallion are bred together who are both by a certain stallion, some will say that such a foal is a "genetic son" of that stallion, or some other term. It is not a "direct" or "own" son, though. So other breeders sometimes want to make it clear that the horse they are advertising is an actual son of a certain horse, and not just a combination of linebreeding to make it almost-like-a-son. Clear as dirt?
 

WeeOkie

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I think it is just a way people emphasize the relationship. Doesn't bother me and I've probably even done it at times.


Rita
 

Jill

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It doesn't bother me when people use that but I smile about this or that foal OUT of a particular stallion. I think foals are by the stallion and out of the mare. But maybe some stallions are more versatile than mine
 
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Irish Hills Farm

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It doesn't bother me when people use that but I smile about this or that foal OUT of a particular stallion. I think foals are by the stallion and out of the mare. But maybe some stallions are more versatile than mine
LOL I crack up too when I see a foal out of a stallion....poor stallion, labor must've been heck.


In regards to the direct/own son/daughter, that doesn't bother me at all. I've used the terms myself and like Kitty stated a foal's name doesn't always indicated the relation and by using those terms you know exactly who the daddy is. (or momma)
 

Leeana

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I think it has something to do with the region the farm(s) live in ...i know different parts of the country have different slang ext. It doesnt bother me, i use both.

And yes ....a foal is BY a stallion and OUT of a mare, doesnt bother me when i see it vice versa but i word it right to keep it less confusing
.
 

txminipinto

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It's all "horse speak". Own son, own daughter, out of (mare), by (stud), etc. One saying that I was called out on was "stud colt". A colt is a colt right? Nope, stud colt means he still has the goods and anything under 3yrs of age is technically a colt. Colt could mean that he's already been gelded, but when I say stud colt it means he's intact. Just the lingo.
 

HGFarm

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'Horse speak' is it I guess. Have heard of all kinds of ways of describing it, but I guess using 'own' or 'direct' is not uncommon. Dont know where that started, but I guess it is kind of silly when you think about it. You made me laugh about the adopted part.

And I think the same thing about the foal being BY such and such a stallion.... yep, I bet it was a C section!


The term 'stud colt' is used here a lot. I've heard it from everyone from old cowboys to folks who just have pets. And yes, it's a still intact colt. You'd never refer to an already gelded youngster as a stud colt- I guess it just gets stuck with 'gelding', LOL

Hey you guys getting the rain- SEND SOME HERE!!!
 

Marty

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I think it would be easier if we all said it the good ole country way

"This here's yee daddy and this here's yee mama.....yonders da memaw and pappaw"

 
S

StarRidgeAcres

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Some people will advertise a horse that is linebred and has 50% of his genetic makeup (supposedly or theoretically) from a certain horse, for example if a mare and stallion are bred together who are both by a certain stallion, some will say that such a foal is a "genetic son" of that stallion, or some other term. It is not a "direct" or "own" son, though. So other breeders sometimes want to make it clear that the horse they are advertising is an actual son of a certain horse, and not just a combination of linebreeding to make it almost-like-a-son. Clear as dirt?
I know this is why I've used it in the past as pointed out here. I'm trying to communicate to a potential buyer that my horse is really out of or by said horse and not just beleived to be a certain percentage of said horses blood. Did I explain that correctly?
 

Miniv

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Some people will advertise a horse that is linebred and has 50% of his genetic makeup (supposedly or theoretically) from a certain horse, for example if a mare and stallion are bred together who are both by a certain stallion, some will say that such a foal is a "genetic son" of that stallion, or some other term. It is not a "direct" or "own" son, though. So other breeders sometimes want to make it clear that the horse they are advertising is an actual son of a certain horse, and not just a combination of linebreeding to make it almost-like-a-son. Clear as dirt?
Actually, that is the FIRST time I've ever heard a viable reason for using those terms! Thank you. Larry has used them occasionally when typing up an ad and I have just smiled and shook my head.
 

Minimor

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Certain breeds/disciplines use the term in order to more specifically describe parentage. As an example, using Miniatures:

Someone may advertise "For sale: Buckeroo stallion" or some variation of that. That wording could mean that what they really have is a stallion whose pedigree includes Buckeroo 3 times. But, that same wording could also mean that the horse is a son of Buckeroo. So, to clarify which it is, the owner may advertise the horse as being an own son of Buckeroo. That way there is no doubt about the exact relationship.

Yes of course there are other ways of saying that exact same thing, and the 'own son' thing isn't something that is commonly used in Miniatures nor in a number of other breeds. But, in certain breeds it is a common term that people think nothing of using. They aren't trying to sound more prestigious or important, it's just a descriptive term that they are using. Probably there are a few people that use it in a pretentious sort of way, but usually that isn't the case.
 

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