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mgtman

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Can anyone tell me what is required besides a coggins and health certificate to ship a miniature horse to Canada? Is there anything special about the health certificate? It will be a weanling colt and will probably go by air.
Thanks, Bob
 

willowoodstables

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Get on the horn to your Federal (State) vet. You need PERMANENT EXPORT HEALTH papers to transport a horse, in addition to a current (within 6 months) coggins.

Kim
 

Mona

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Mary Lou...what do you mean they need to be precleared? When did this come into effect? I have never had to do that before, or is this just because it is coming by air, rather than by land?
 

Danielle_E.

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Mary Lou, they do have to be pre-cleared. It's something new that Marilyn told me when I made arrangements for shipping. We were going to be shipping the week of August 15th but because of this and the seller's vet told her that wasn't enough time to get all the paperwork done and in the proper hands for pre-clearance we are now looking at the week of August 21. What a pain!
 

Mona

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Good Lord, they sure want to make it difficult for us to buy/sell cross border!!


What exactly is required for this? What is needed, and what is the process?

I know they need to be pre-cleared going into the US, but I didn't know Canada was doing the same. UGH!
 

Danielle_E.

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It use to be that the requirement was that the shipper be the only one that needed to have those papers in hand when crossing at the border but the way I understand it is that a copy of the papers has to be at the border BEFORE and not just show up with them. Mona, I think you are right, even the shippers use a broker, I think that is what Marilyn said to me. I know I am paying on top of the shipping fee to get the horses from point A to point B an additional $125 for "border" expenses. That is probably the broker fee. I will send Marilyn an email and get some details and post here for those that travel to the U.S. from Canada to pick-up and vice versa.
 

Mona

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Yes Bob, there is tax. There is a 7% GST.(GST=Goods and Services Tax) There is also PST(PST=Provincial Sales Tax...% amount varies from province to province) These percentages are based on the CANADIAN value of the horse, which is higher than the US value.
 

DebiM

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Thank you for posting this and getting additional info for us, Danielle!
 

Danielle_E.

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Mona, we don't pay PST (provincial sales tax) on the horses crossing to us from the U.S. What I will be paying is the GST (goods and services tax) on my mare but I believe it is on the Canadian value $$ which means take the U.S. value on the bill of sale and convert to the Canadian $$ value on that day of crossing and pay 7% (GST) on that amount. At least that is what I was told. No mention of PST at all and we have never paid PST or didn't on Abby.
 

Danielle_E.

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Bob, I will try and find out from Marilyn exactly what is entailed in all of this. I believe you only need 1 broker, not a broker on each side of the border. You are in the U.S. correct? You or the buyer is coming to pick-up the horse and having to cross the border? Is that the scenario?
 

mgtman

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Danielle_E. said:
Bob, I will try and find out from Marilyn exactly what is entailed in all of this.  I believe you only need 1 broker, not a broker on each side of the border.  You are in the U.S. correct?  You or the buyer is coming to pick-up the horse and having to cross the border? Is that the scenario?
441644[/snapback]

The buyer would pick up the horse at the airport. We would take care of all the forms here and ship from Houston. Thanks, Bob
 

Danielle_E.

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This might help explain for some. Still checking for you Bob and Deb.

[ PAPS – PRE-ARRIVAL PROCESSING SYSTEM:
U.S. Customs Pre-Arrival Processing System regulations are now fully active at all U.S. ports-of-entry for “commercial shipments†into the United States. These new regulations require the electronic pre-filing of all customs entry documents in advance of arriving at a U.S. Customs centre. Shipments into the U.S. must be handled by a shipper/carrier with a SCAC (Standard Carrier Alpha Code). This pre-assigned carrier-code number must be issued in advance of border crossing, and customs documents must have bar-coded stickers that include the carrier-code.

The Pre-Arrival Processing System was rolled out in three phases at Canada-U.S. border crossings, during November/04 through January/05 and is now in full implementation. In general media discussions on enhanced border security issues for the United States, the regulations are popularly referred to as the “24-Hour-Rule†… provisions of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) advance cargo information requirements of the U.S. Trade Act of 2002.

Equine Canada sought clarification as to whether horses crossing the border into the U.S. would be considered “commercial shipmentsâ€, and therefore be required to comply with the PAPS pre-arrival filing process. Enquiries to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, International Trade Canada (Ottawa), and Foreign Affairs Canada (Washington Embassy), provided the following information, as at Friday, February 4, 2005:

“For horses entering the United States for exhibition or other temporary purposes, entering the U.S. on a Temporary Importation Bond (the “30-day-import†requirements), there has been no change of policy. Such temporary importation of horses would not require filing of PAPS (or BRASS) pre-arrival notifications.â€

This does not eliminate any existing requirements for temporary import for horses into the U.S. You will still be required to provide all veterinarian health certificates, manifests, etc. that are currently required for temporary entry of horses.

As is often the case with new regulations, there may be some confusion in the short term with horses crossing at different U.S. ports-of-entry. On Equine Canada’s behalf, Canadian Embassy officials in Washington have requested that written clarification of the guidelines for horses should be distributed to all U.S. Customs offices. Equine Canada will post and distribute this clarification as soon as it is available.

It is expected that horses entering the U.S. as permanent exports (including horses sold to U.S. customers), would be required to complete the Pre-Arrival Processing System requirements. Those responsible for shipping horses for permanent export to the United States, would be required to have a SCAC (Standard Carrier Alpha Code), to acquire bar-coded stickers to place on all customs documents, and would need to use the services of a broker to file documents prior to arrival at the border.

Failure to comply with PAPS pre-arrival filing requirements in advance of border crossing, could trigger fines of up to $5,000.

For information on how to get a SCAC and bar-code stickers, contact the

National Motor Freight Traffic Association (NMFTA)

703-838-1868 or www.NMFTA.org

3) WHAT SHOULD YOU DO TODAY?

As if often the case when new regulations are implemented, there may be some confusion about the requirements for horses crossing the border. Additional information on U.S. Customs requirements, can be found on the U.S. Customs & Border Protection site at:

www.cpb.gov

OPTIONS TO CONSIDER:

o Commercial carriers – The Canadian commercial horse transportation companies that were contacted by Equine Canada representatives all reported that they have completed the required paperwork for SCAC and bar-coded documents. You may want to consider using commercial carriers to move horses to the U.S.

o For horses travelling to U.S. on temporary export permits – Call ahead to the Customs Office at your intended port of crossing. Contact information for US Customs Offices are available on the U.S. Customs & Border Protection site at:

http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/toolbox/ports/

o Apply for SCAC number – If you regularly cross the border with horses, either for temporary entry with your own horses or other horses in your care, you should consider applying for a Standard Carrier Alpha Code for yourself or your stable. This is a one-time set-up process to have a number assigned to yourself as a shipper/carrier, but would require that you work with a U.S. customs broker to process the required documents for shipments to the U.S.

o Keep checking the Equine Canada website – Equine Canada will continue to post updates on the status of border crossing regulations as they become available. Keep checking the EC website at:

www.equinecanada.ca

/QUOTE]
 

yankee_minis

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I should be delivering two mini donkeys to Nova Scotia in the next week or two. I have called the US customs border and they needed nothing. The Nova Scotia people said that they needed a "Zoo Sanitary Export Certificate" (Not sure what that is) in addition to the Coggins report.

My vet did a Canadian health certificate and that has to be signed by an FDA vet at the state offices. This extra paperwork cost me an additonal $91, on top of the coggins tests.

All these discussions with the customs people was done earlier this week-- Tuesday.

I think I will call the Canadian customs people again and ask specifically about this new thing. I will let you know what I find out.

Thanks!
 

Mona

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Danielle and Mary Lou, I have just spent the last LONG while speaking to MANY, MANY people in the different branches and ares of the Government in regards to the Inspection Agenct, Agriculture Canada, Canada Customs, etc., and NONE have any knowledge of anything that requires a pre-clearance of any horses coming into Ontario. I have NO idea WHERE that is coming from! The only thing I can think of, is that the stories have goteen crossed. I know the US has recently implemented this...is is knows as PAPS, and they need the pre-approval for horses going INTO the US, but nobody in Canada had any knowledge. I also looked at the news on the gov't website, and nothing there either.

The requirements according to everyone I spoke with remain the same as they always have...that is, a current coggins(within 6 months) and a Permanent Export to Canada, (Form 17-145 Export/Health Certificate). No vet needs to meet you at the border, HOWEVER, currently, NO HORSES ARE ALLOWED IMPORT from Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, and Colorado.

As for the PST Danielle, yes, there is PST(as well as GST) payable on horses imported for breeding, if the Canadian value is $1600 or more.

Importers that may be using these horses for breeding that want to avoid paying the taxes, can apply for an Import Number by calling 1-800-959-5525.

Pehaps because Marilyn is a commercial hauler, they have different requirements?
 

Danielle_E.

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This is what Marilyn just sent me. Bob, I just sent her an email asking her specifically about your situation, a horse flying from the U.S. to Canada and a possible name of a broker up here.

Crossing into Canada you now need to pre-clear with Customs which means they have to be alerted that you are coming over. This is to also facilitate the payment of the g.s.t. on the purchase price, and there is a form on their website that should be sent called a C1:

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/E/pbg/cf/ci1

Because we are commercial haulers we also pay bonding charges which certify that the horses are coming in legitimately.

----- Original Message -----
 

Danielle_E.

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And here I thought Free Trade was suppose to make life easier, stupid me for thinking that
 

Mona

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Yes Danielle, this is for horses GOING INTO THE US...NOT coming into Canada!

Edited to add...this is a portion of the post I was referring to here...

It is expected that horses entering the U.S. as permanent exports (including horses sold to U.S. customers), would be required to complete the Pre-Arrival Processing System requirements. Those responsible for shipping horses for permanent export to the United States, would be required to have a SCAC (Standard Carrier Alpha Code), to acquire bar-coded stickers to place on all customs documents, and would need to use the services of a broker to file documents prior to arrival at the border.
 
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Danielle_E.

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Well I don't know then Mona what to tell you. This is the information I received from the transport bringing my horse and Val's from the U.S., that pre-clearance is a necessity now. It doesn't add to the cost it just adds to the time needed to get all this in order before the horse(s) arrive at the border to cross. I never paid PST on Abby and she was over that $$ value you mentioned and they knew it was a mare so don't know or remember if they asked if she was going to be bred. The only thing Marilyn mentioned of course was the GST and that I fully expected having to pay. One way or the other I don't have to worry since you mentioned $1600 and this mare is way under that figure in U.S. or Canadian
 

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