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lilhorseladie

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I haven't been here for a long time. Too busy when I'm teaching, but school got out last Wednesday and now I can come back to read and learn.

My last year foal started showing signs of locking stifle, and now drags his whole back end. I made an appointment to put him down next Tuesday. It makes me sad. I called several colleges to see if maybe they would want to do some practice work on him, but no luck. So I can only think the humane thing to do is to put him down. It makes me sad. I didn't re breed either parents last year or this year. I won't. I have sold the Stallion and the mare is just hanging out, looking for a pet home.

Well, I am going to read up on some of the events of the last year!

Thanks,

Staci
 

hobbyhorse23

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I'm sorry to hear about that. Have you considered the surgery to fix it?
I certainly wouldn't breed the animal but it's quite possible for him to have a happy, healthy life for the same cost as having him put down.

Leia
 

kaykay

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Locking stifle is not usually a fatal condition. No I would never rebreed the two and I would not breed him but it doesnt mean he has to be put down. The surgery to snip it is not that expensive and can be done right at the farm.
 

Miniv

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Have you talked to a vet about this? It it is indeed his stifles, it is correctable, as others have posted.
 

terrid

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Years ago I had a shetland that had a locking stifle and we had the vet fix it and he turned out great. NOW I have a horse that has the same problem but not as bad and now the vet and farrier says that exercise, exercise, exercise, that is the best thing for it and it is. Please don't put him down for that, I'm sure someone would take him if you didn't want to mess with it.
 

Marnie

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I too had a horse like that a few yrs ago, an auction horse turned out to have locking stifles. The surgery was only about $120 and took about ten minutes, just makes a couple small cuts and the horse had no more problems. If you haven't looked into this surgery, I'd think you would want to before just putting him down but good luck with whatever you do.
 

lilhorseladie

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I have had the vet take a look at Shadow. Both stifles are locked most of the time and he is pulling himself around completely by his front legs. The vet said it didn't look good as far as trying to fix the problem. The vet coming out is a different person, I'm willing to listen, but not willing to let a yearling suffer because I don't want to let him go.

Thanks all!
 

Russ

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Staci, I have no advice. Just wanted to say good luck and glad to see you posting on the forum.
 

Marnie

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Oh Staci, I hope I didn't come across as judgemental, that's not what I meant at all. I was just wondering if you'd known or looked into the surgery. I know that you can't let a horse be in pain and to put one down is always a tough decision. Again, I'm sorry if I sounded harsh, please forgive me, I didn't mean to come across as rude or snotty.
 

lilhorseladie

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Not at all Marnie! I have looked at many avenues, as well as offering to turn him over to vet schools across the country. None were interested. My vet did some contact work for me to try to find someone who might be willing to use him as a practice. If successful, he could have gone to a pet home. I am just so sad when I see him dragging himself around the farm. I think about the doxies with wheels and wondered if he could ride a cart
Anyway, thanks for all the comments and concern.
 

disneyhorse

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Euthanasia is never an easy decision to make, but I believe that animals cannot choose the quality of life they have and do not understand why they have to suffer. They do not rationalize their medical conditions like a human can. In the wild, they would quickly be eaten.

I support your decision, I can not see your horse in person but a good animal owner knows their animals and does the best by them that they can.

I am so sorry you have to go through this


Andrea
 

hobbyhorse23

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We ALL support your decision as putting them down is never easy and if you've come to that point you've clearly had to make a hard choice based on what's best for the horse. We just wanted to be sure you knew about the surgery! It's made such a difference for my little gelding this year and many others that I've talked to.


Do you mean he's literally dragging himself around by the forehand, like his hind end is on the ground?


Leia
 

lilhorseladie

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Leia,

I will try to snap a picture of him. His back legs support him and that is it. He has everything so stretched out, that he looks almost backwards in the hind end. He is upright but all movement comes soley from his front. I will try to get a clear pic this afternoon. He is a perky lil guy sometimes, but others, the effort to move seems futile. Some days he stands like he is teathered from the back end, trying to decide which way to go.

Staci
 

wildoak

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We had a filly several years ago who was nearly as bad as you describe. Hers started suddenly when she was still a weanling, and locked both back legs. Awful for a baby who wants to run so. I'd say she was locked maybe 50% of the time. We had the nicking surgery done on her, gave her away and to my knowledge she is still okay as a pet. (long story - she stayed with our house when we sold it). In hindsight, if I were keeping her and wanting to use her for anything I'd probably have done the more invasive surgery. Each case is different, hope there is a solution for yours.

Jan
 

lilhorseladie

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Shadows started as a weanling also. They are locked probably 90 percent of the time. I will definately discuss the surgery with a new vet before I put him down. Thank you all!
 

bevann

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I had a weanling several years ago whose leg was locking so badly she was dragging her leg on her fetlock.My vet didn't want to do the surgery on 1 so young, but she did it at my insistence.The filly was better immediately.I gave her away as a pet, but keep in touch.The new owner sent me photos of her running and jumping.I can give you the number of my vet if your vet wants to talk to her.I have also had several others done and all are fine. 1 little mare is now learning to be a driving horseand doing quite well at it.
 
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