Real (english) shetlands...

Discussion in 'Pony Talk' started by Ouburgia, Aug 28, 2008.

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  1. Sep 12, 2008 #41

    disneyhorse

    disneyhorse

    disneyhorse

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Here are two of my American Shetlands, they are Modern Pleasure type. You can see they are NOT anything remotely like the English/Island Shetlands that they have been breeding away from for over a century. They have been bred for this type, specifically...

    One of my Modern American Shetlands was recently purchased from a lady in Germany. Soooo they are making their way to Europe... hopefully they will find some fans over there!

    Andrea
     
  2. Sep 25, 2008 #42

    Ouburgia

    Ouburgia

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    No offence, couse I like them (especially the first one) But in my eyes a better name should be "american Hackney" or something
     
  3. Sep 25, 2008 #43

    Boinky

    Boinky

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    but they aren't hackney's either which is also a very old breed... why would you think it would be OK to give them the name 'american hackney" but it's not ok to be an "american shetland".... it's all semantics. They are what the are and there is no changing it. They may not be what you consider a "true"/ "island" shetland but in America they are called shetlands and despite what many seem to think they were decended from island shetlands for the most part. It's about like people saying shetlands shouldn't be in the mini horse reistry... well itis what it is. it's funny how most of the top horses in the world or top mini lines came from direct decendants of shetlands. yep they might very well have hackney in them but look at many other breed of horses how they hardship in other breeds ect at some point in their history.

    What people need to do is just learn to accept such is life. If you don't like a certain "type" or "breed" don't breed for it or buy it. there is plenty of variety in the world. Why is one wrong to breed and one is right? all depends on who you ask i guess. i'm not big on either moderns or the island shetlands......If a majority didn't like something it would be aweful hard to breed fr these charachteristics because you'd never be able to sell one..what would be the point? obviously there is a market/demand and it's being filled weather I or you like it.
     
  4. Sep 25, 2008 #44

    disneyhorse

    disneyhorse

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    I would like to point out that "Shetlands" are not the only horse considered to be vastly different from the "foundation origins." (I would also like to say that Boinky has it right... Hackneys are also their own special breed and a Classic Shetland is NO WHERE near what a true Hackney pony is!)

    The original Belgian draft horse (from Belgium), looks something like this:

    [​IMG]

    Well, we Americans imported them and selectively bred them, so we have "Belgians" here now that we show and love and they are the most common draft horse in the United States. However, to differentiate, we call these guys "American Belgians" and the older ones above the Belgian Brabant.

    This is what we are used to seeing over here:

    [​IMG]

    So you can see... both horses are beautiful but they are vastly different. Here in the U.S. we apparently like to breed for refinement, upheaded presence, and lots of motion. Thus we have the American Saddlebred and such. Both types have their fans, I just wanted to point out that it happens in lots of imported breeds. Even Percherons, Clydesdales, Andalusians, etc. are going to be more refined out here, that's the overall type we seem to breed for. Heck, even dogs.... most dogs are taller and more refined than their European cousins!!!

    Andrea
     
  5. Sep 25, 2008 #45

    Leeana

    Leeana

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    Exactly! This is what i have been saying...America tends to american'ize allot of the breeds we have today...we make everything leggy and refined...
     
  6. Sep 26, 2008 #46

    Boinky

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    well considering the influx of exports in many of our breeds to Europe, Australia ect they can't hate our "Americanization" too much is my thinking. I think for the most part we like refinement and pretty. doesn't mean we hate what the old style is.. just didn't suit our needs and purposes and what we want to look at every day.

    I'd also like to point out we call them "AMERICAN" because it does destinquish them from true island shetlands or true whatever breed.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 26, 2008
  7. Sep 26, 2008 #47

    bannerminis

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    I just wanted to say that the word Shetland (as I am from Ireland) always brings to mind your standard British Shetland pony - short, stocky and hairy.

    But I was really surprised then when I came across the American Shetland as to my mind it couldnt be further from the original breed. But I like both in their own right and think they all have their plus points when you are looking at these animals.

    Here is a link to Beltoy Stud in Northern Ireland - I got to know the Bells over the last yr as they do a lot of showing but also did a lot of judging for us at our miniature horse shows.

    They breed and show Shetlands - I know what some are saying about them being over weight but shetlands here are shown in their natural state and there is no clipping or bridal paths or trimming of the feather - they are shown in all their glory so to speak.

    http://www.beltoy.com/index.htm

    Slightly off topic then

    Our native breed is of course the Conemara pony and I have see them in all shapes and sizes from the more stocky to ones that almost have an Arab TB look going on and all 100% Connemara.

    Only in the last couple of yrs has the Kerry Bog Pony been recognised as a breed and now you see more and more people breeding these Kerry Bog Pony's

    Here is a link to a website that will give you an idea of what the breed is about. I personally dont know a whole lot about them and have yet to see one in the flesh.

    http://www.kerrybogpony.ie/index.htm
     
  8. Sep 29, 2008 #48

    maplegum

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    I've had a very quick look at that shetland site. Aren't they jusst beautiful! They are the type of shetlands that we have here in Australia. Chunky, hairy. Ours are also shown in their natural state and I wish minis were too. Mother nature gave them such beauty and we clip it off and then apply ghastly makeup!

    I would love our minis to be shown in their natural state.
     
  9. Sep 29, 2008 #49

    Celtic Hill Farm

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    I think the american'izing of horses is good, i love refined horses, i don't really like the stockey ones. But it really depends on the person, and what you are doing with them. I would much rather have an American Shetland, vs. a "Shetland Shetland". I think the americans look nicer in the show ring, just my opinion.
     
  10. Oct 1, 2008 #50

    Ouburgia

    Ouburgia

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    There are a lot of breeds that are refined. Why refined a breed that is supposed to be "stockey"

    Sorry, but I really can't like the american "belgium"

    It has no conformation at all....

    In my opinion: Why americanizing breeds? Why if the breed is good?

    Belgians are working horses, no show horses (for example)

    IMO: If it ain't broke, don't fix it....

    The example I gave for Hackney's.... The horses look more hackney than shetland to me
     
  11. Oct 1, 2008 #51

    Laura

    Laura

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    I agree, that little black pony is a HANDSOME fellow!
     
  12. Oct 1, 2008 #52

    rabbitsfizz

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    I love American "Shetlands" but, as you probably remember, I think it downright daft to call them Shetlands!!

    Why on earth did you not claim this elegant animal completely as your own, they are as much Hackneys or even Welsh as they are Shetlands, why not call them that?? (No, I know that would be silly, my point is they should be called something unique....American Show Pony, perhaps??)

    They aren't Hackneys but they aren't Shetlands, either!!

    They are a beautiful and totally unique animal and, were I still to be doing Leadrein, I would be looking to import a few, and they would really set the Leadrein world on it's ears, I can tell you!!

    That is just the kind of animal they are going for, these days.....I really am tempted, often, I have to keep off Lewellas site, for a start!!!
     
  13. Oct 1, 2008 #53

    Ouburgia

    Ouburgia

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    I can not agree more!
     
  14. Oct 1, 2008 #54

    Lewella

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    You would have been even more tempted had you been with me at Rosvold Farms on Sunday where we had 9 children riding around practicing "games" like barrels, flag race, key race, trail, etc. on American Shetlands, NSPR's (half American Shetlands), small PtHA pinto ponies, and a couple of B miniatures for the 6 and under riders. [​IMG] (We had more ponies saddled than children to ride them so the children were trading off ponies regularly and at least a dozen ponies got to play on the practice course!)

    Playday9_28_08_1.jpg

    (from left - Longman's Renegade -might not be his complete name- AMHR B mini, Dia De Diplomat - ASPC Classic Shetland mare, and "Ramble" - PtHA and hopefully soon NSPR -he's out of Wink's Olive Branch)
     
  15. Oct 3, 2008 #55

    Ouburgia

    Ouburgia

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    Just for the record... I'm liking them more and more, even thinking of importing one once....

    Doesn't mean I agree with the name, but it does meen it are wonderful horses!
     
  16. Oct 3, 2008 #56
    OK ..when I can figure this photo thing out on my computer , i will take a picture of my miniature shetland from France, not Americanized....next to the AMHA registered miniature horse whos parents are from Florida totally Americanized .. and all of you can decide what the differences are. First thing you will notice is the cannon bone... one looks like a twig , and one like a sausage...and it goes on..both really nice breeds. If anyone else has one of each maybe you could do the same , it would be interesting
     

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