Questions about prices

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horsehug

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Let me preface this by saying I am not trying to start any more discussion about if people are breeding too many minis or who should be and who should not be etc. like so many threads have already gotten into.

I simply am curious as to what kind of prices 34" and under (or A size) minis are bringing these days for those of you who do not show, but raise nice correct foals for the most part..... I realize we all get faults in some areas from time to time.... and sell most of your foal crop each year. And I mean both big and small farms, across the country. I realize there is still a high priced market for top show record horses and their GET. But I just mean lots of the farms across the country who are not that well known but like I said have a good eye for horses and do turn out straight legs and good bites and balanced nice little horses that move nicely also.

If you could just give me some ball park figures I would be interested.

Maybe this should have been put into a poll, but I have no clue how to do that. I'd also love to know what part of the country you live in if you respond.

So thanks for any input.
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Edited to add I am talking about private sales from your farm....not auction prices.

Susan O.
 
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Connie P

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Susan,

I live in Michigan and I price my horses according to how "I" feel they should be priced. Most of my horses come from championship backgrounds. I try to price fair, but I will tell you that I will not "give" my horses away. I have paid a pretty penny for most of my herd and I spend a bundle taking care of them. I always interview and research the homes my horses are going to as I truly do care about their future. Double and triple registered are more expensive as is teeny tiny. Pets are priced as pets. I have sold horses anywhere from $500.00 to 10,000.00 plus.

and................I quit showing years ago.
 
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[email protected]

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The majority of people I talk to are trying to reduce their herd or are holding off at this time as worries over a long recession, concerns over the change in adminstration, overly dry borderline drought conditions (here), gas&hay prices - seem to be effecting buying decisions. I've had two people cancel part way through sales - contract signed, deposits, etc., because of job losses.

I asked my farrier and feed supplier recently if they were feeling it and both agreed. Our farrier said people are going a bit longer between trims/shoeings, and my feed store said hay orders were a little slow. Heck with alfalfa (square 75-90lb bale) running close to $15 a bale and grass hay close behind it's really hitting me in the wallet this year! We're paying close to 3x what we paid 3 years ago for hay.

We've sold horses in the $1,500-3,000 range this year, just not as many as last year. (single and double registered A size, one unregistered pet) I also have not been marketing them at all, but that's a whole 'nother problem!!!

Honestly I haven't been following prices this year which I normally do, just been an off year for me with other commitments taking the driving seat - so to speak!
 

disneyhorse

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Yeah Michelle... I was listening to a local vet the other day saying that he's had clients call him out to look at their horses because they are "not keeping weight on" and when he asks to see the hay they say "Oh the feed truck should be coming today" and they have NO food. They pay a vet to come out and look at their horse, and not to FEED it.

Feed prices are pretty high. I can't say it bothers me a ton, because the horses are a luxury anyway, no matter HOW much they cost.
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My husband stared at me this week when I bought $50 worth of Pony Pops. I tried to tell him they "last a long time" and he just laughed and said it was okay because he'd probably buy a LOT more horse treats than I do. Heaven forbid my babies don't have toys and treats you know! People though, FEED YOUR HORSES!!!

Andrea
 

Carolyn R

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I know this isn't he answer you want to hear, but there are alot of variables in the factor.

Where you live, what the economic status is of the people in a certain radius of you, is it more of a country area or is it rapidly getting built up, how you are going to market your animals, is a good home more important than a top dollar, it really is about personal feelings, supply and demand and quality.

Quality also means so many different things to so many people. To me quality isn't just a good looking, well put together horse, having a good bite and good legs, but have they been worked with or are they practically wild, have they had proper upkeep, are they kept presentable or are they hairy and look like raggamuffins (they may be a nice animal, but who can tell under all that hair?) and yes, to me, after all else checks out, bloodlines are something I look at, last, but It is still important to me.

Lets not forget, there are those people that want color, comfirmation, a show record, broke to drive, under 34 inches, A/R reg. and in foal to a high ranking stallion for under $1000, and I just sit back and chuckle, funny people.

To others, quality means a whole other thing, and some are not nearly as picky as I am.

Carolyn
 

horsehug

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Thanks all of you who have responded so far. And I do appreciate it and all the answers help me in trying to figure it out.

Carolyn, I was not looking for a specific answer. :) I truly wanted to see just where the market is other than the super low like at some auctions, and the super high for certain horses and farms and names. And I agree all those other things you mention, factor in.

I think it sounds better than I expected in some ways, and more like the recession is really hurting mini sales in others' ways.

If anyone else has answers or opinions I'd appreciate them also.

Susan O.
 

bingo

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I agree a lot depends on location as well as your farm and who you market to. I would say that horses from a farm who does not show or does not have horses with their farm name out there in the show ring, or horses who do not drive, jump, obstacle to expect to sell them for 300 to 1000.00. Long gone are the days tiny and color bring in money.

I think for the most part horses are now selling for what they are worth as opposed to selling for big bucks due to a pretty color.
 

Katiean

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Horses in my area range in prices of $500-$2500. These are nonshow prices. We sold an unregistered colt for $750 after we bought his mom for $550, pregnent. We were no5t able to get info on the stud so he went unregistered. I would not pass up looking at the $500 horses because someone might not know what they have.
 

Kitty

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I have to agree I think it is alot of factors. Parts of Wisconsin have been hit hard by rain and crops are drowned and farms in rags. We have been luckier up North in Wisconsin. Hay is plentiful and weather good. Grain prices ARE TERRIBLE and am paying 2x what I was last year and don't see it getting better.

Diesel has dropped $0.50 a gallon however and I feel that is a good thing. I think gas prices affect alot of things overall and maybe the downward trend will have a positive impact on everything. Honestly it seems that people that live more south probably have a easier time selling. I got alot of comments about transportation costs being so far North and I have heard that from several people that live in the Northern areas.

We have sold a number of horses for reasonable money. I price the horse where it should be priced based on lots of factors. But I also try to offer free to minimal transportation costs when I can also. Anyway a person can help reduce costs is a good thing for the buyer. We have also purchased a number of really nice mares this year for Treasure
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and I will be posting them soon
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To me a great mare or stallion with proven lines and great produce records will cost more, can be $3k or $10k or more and that is OK based on the horse.

I have to question a horse that someone is selling as National quality for a super low price. Esp with a picture that does it no justice. I WILL NOT send a horse to auction. I made a promise to myself 29 years ago when I was a youngster and saw auctions up front and personal and I did not like it. I can honestly say I have never sent a horse to auction except for the Hertiage Sale.

That's my thoughts. Good, bad or indifferent
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Jill

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For my money, it would depend a lot on how "typy" the foal / horse to sell is. Correct is a must, but if the horse is show type, that's what would get a reasonable price from me -- I'd expect to pay $3,000 and up for a horse I thought was show quality and could produce show quality offspring (from whatever breeder -- show or not). But "just" correct wouldn't get my money. The horse needs to be typy and showy as well as correct. (For the record, though, I'm not looking to buy right now... For now, I'm happy and looking forward to next year's shows and foals.)
 
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palsminihorses

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Hi Susan,

As you know, I live in the midwest. I have just recently sold two geldings for $300 and $600. We also sold a mare as a "pet" because she could not be bred.......for $500. Two were sold locally, and one went to AR. These were all double registered and nothing wrong with them. I also know that these horses have great homes! Bred mares are priced from $1,200 up. With today's feed prices and fuel prices, I have lowered prices.

Pam C.
 

maestoso

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Who are you trying to market your foals. I am a bit confused by your question I guess. Do you mean that you have foals to sell that are nice and correct enough but not really show quality? Or do you mean that your foals ARE show quality, you just don't show....? To me, there is a difference. If wasn't looking for show horse, my only criteria would be a sound horse that I liked. I wouldn't worry if maybe the tail set was a little low or the neck set was low or if it was a little bit cow hocked. And if that is what I was looking for I know that I can get that around here for less than $800, so I wouldn't even consider paying more than that.

If I was looking for a horse that was quality enough to show at unrated local shows, but maybe not quite nice enough for rated shows, I might pay up to $1000 but I still think if I looked hard enough i could get one for less than $800.

If I am looking for a show horse, and your foals are nice enough for the show ring, I really wouldn't care that you don't show, or don't have the titles, it would be the quality of the horse that matters. There are plenty of champions that come from no where and plenty of crap that comes from farms with dozens of world titles.

Like Jill, if I was buying a show horse I would expect to start at aroun $2,500-$3000.

It sounds like maybe you are marketing your foals as CORRECT pets, in which case, it depends on what they are worth to you, but I would look to spend between $500 and $1000.
 

Ashley

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I did just sell two colts. BOth under $500. However they sold, on application, gelding contract and are for a young girl.
 

horsehug

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Hi Matt,

I am not talking about trying to market foals to anyone in particular.

I just wondered where the market is these days, pricewise, for nice, or quality, foals from farms that are not big names or show farms. And I realize that even the word "nice" or "quality" can be subjective.... as in "Beauty is in the eye the beholder".

I learned long ago that to say show quality means different things to different people, and I have seen it debated on this forum and I do not choose to get into that, as I do not feel qualified to really critique a horse well enough to know if it would be national or world show quality. I did used to advertise some of mine as show quality years ago until I saw it hotly debated and realized that I was not saying I thought mine would win national or world titles necessarily (as so many seemed to imply that phrase had to mean) and so I leave judging whether or not they are show quality up to those who see their pics or better yet my little horses themselves.

I do breed for what I like personally and am thrilled when some of them are shown by buyers, no matter what level of shows.

I'm sorry my question confused you. And I apporeciate your answer as well as all the other ones. :)

Susan O.
 

Buckskin gal

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Hi Susan, I am curious to know what you have been getting for yours lately...would help people in the area as to what minis are being sold for. I think that many minis around here are selling low because there are quite a number to choose from. I have noticed that even those who have had driving experience aren't selling very high. I still get inquires for minis even though I now have nothing I want to sell. I think there will always be some market for nice pet minis but prices appear to be much lower than in years past.

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Mary

,

I am not talking about trying to market foals to anyone in particular.

I just wondered where the market is these days, pricewise, for nice, or quality, foals from farms that are not big names or show farms. And I realize that even the word "nice" or "quality" can be subjective.... as in "Beauty is in the eye the beholder".

I learned long ago that to say show quality means different things to different people, and I have seen it debated on this forum and I do not choose to get into that, as I do not feel qualified to really critique a horse well enough to know if it would be national or world show quality. I did used to advertise some of mine as show quality years ago until I saw it hotly debated and realized that I was not saying I thought mine would win national or world titles necessarily (as so many seemed to imply that phrase had to mean) and so I leave judging whether or not they are show quality up to those who see their pics or better yet my little horses themselves.

I do breed for what I like personally and am thrilled when some of them are shown by buyers, no matter what level of shows.

I'm sorry my question confused you. And I apporeciate your answer as well as all the other ones. :)

Susan O.
 

Hosscrazy

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Hi Susan -

AMHA registered minis in my area are going for $1500 at the very low end to $5000 at the higher end. Most of the AMHA minis I'm seeing are around $2500 - $3500. Sales have been very slow around here, with the exception of "pet quality" minis which go for around $500 or so.

Liz R.
 
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LisaF.

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Susan you asked exactly what I have been wondering myself.

I live in the midwest - Missouri

Pam I seen your post and that helped me ( by the way Pam - you need to come visit when you can).

So, if anyone knows about the midwest also I would love to hear their answers.
 

horsehug

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Hi Mary,

I sold a 15 year old really nice bred mare that was in foal for this past spring for $1500.

I also sold a pet quality mare for $500.

Then of my 4 fillys this spring I had one priced at $1500 and another at $2000 but let the pair go for a package price of $3000 to some good friends.

I sold my fillys last year between $1500 and $2000.

I had lots of inquiries on my tiny black filly Blackberry this year with the white feet and feel I could have gotten the $2000 to $2500 for her if I sold her alone. I do still get most of my inquiries and good prices on my tiny and colorful correct foals. Needless to say I had quite a few people inquire on my leopard filly Wish Upon a Star. And I am sure I could have sold her for a super price. But she is a keeper.

My colts last year I got $1200 and $750, and $500 for one solid red but nice colt, and $500 for one pet quality colt.

All of these horses were double AMHA/AMHR (except the pet colt).

I agree the market is lower for me than in past years. But I am happy to see that for the most part I am doing okay compared to other parts of the country, with maybe the exception of CA of the ones mentioned.

Susan O.
 

HGFarm

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Here is AZ, nothing seems to be moving at all. I have two priced at $550 and $800 (weanling colt who is not bad in my opinion) and a yearling filly. Since gas is so high, and the state here is the 3rd in the nation for forclosures, and jobs are going away by the hundreds, nothing is moving at all. Hay is 15 a bale for alfalfa and bermuda was $18.50 this week?!!! What is up with THAT?

In the past, ALL of my foals were sold by weaning time or well before- between $1500 and $12000.00. The market here stinks and no one wants to pay gas fees.
 

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