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Pro's and Cons of "older mini's"

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MelissaAH

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I found a woman who has two mini's for sale, very inexpensive. Her daughter is in college now and lost interest. They are 18 & 21 year old mares that must be sold together. She bought them in 2002.

What are the pros and cons?
 

Hosscrazy

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My first mini was 16 years old when I bought her and it was the best purchase I could have made! She was laid back and mellow - a wonderful companion for me. I have such a sweet spot for seniors, though!

Are these driving mares? I know from your previous post this is important to you. I'm sure there are people here on the forum who have senior horses who still drive.

Same as full size horses, the senior horses need their teeth regularly checked and may have special dietary needs (equine senior, etc.) There are plenty of vets in our area that can help you with that.

On the downside, of course, they are seniors and most likely are reaching the latter part of their lifespan. However, I lost a 9 year old last year - so you know what? There are no guarantees (just like with us!)

If you are looking for a wonderful companion, I highly recommend the seniors!

Liz R.
 
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Michelle@wescofarms

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There are people that train/drive older horses, but you need to have a very thorough vet check as you won't know what has occurred in their lives as far as care. Much different than raising a horse for 10-20 years and you know all its been through and what its limits are - so it might be extremely useful well into its late 20's.

As healthy minis can live up and into their 30's you could have them around for a bit are you prepared for that? If your goal is casual driving you'd be fine (assuming they're healthy/capable), but the reality is they are seniors and will be less thrifty and will eventually be more prone to joint issues - it happens to everyone as they age.

But if you cannot undertake the commitment to keep the two together and plan on the senior care involved you should pass. It wouldn't be fair to the two mares to get them (not that you would) and then decide you only want one or have them and sell one two years from now.

I have four mares between the age of 20-25 and yes they could be trained to drive but I feel as they've give over the years as broodmares now is their time to be lazy in a field and enjoy their senior time. I owe them for all they've given. My personal opinion though.

So you need to look at what you want. Companion they'd be perfect. Breeding/showing - no. Driving possible.
 

Joanne

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I agree with Diane. You learn so much from these older horses. They are worth their weight in gold. Many are terriffic baby sitters, though they may be too old to have any of their own anymore.
 

MiniMaid

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well the horse has lots of exxpieriance but it may die soon.
 

MelissaAH

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No they have not been driven and these two I did not plan for driving. More like "pets" and for fun. I would still look into another mini at the breeder I am dealing with. They are suppose to have wonderful temperments and the age is great for someone like me just getting into them.
 

Hosscrazy

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You never know how long they're going to live - young or old. Unfortunately, horses (and humans) don't come with expiration dates attached.


Good luck and keep us posted!

Liz R.
 

MelissaAH

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You never know how long they're going to live - young or old. Unfortunately, horses (and humans) don't come with expiration dates attached.

Good luck and keep us posted!

Liz R.
I will! And if I get them you will have to come over and visit. We are practically neighbors!
 

minie812

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I have no complaints about all my seniors. A little extra on the feed-teeth care but they are a wonderful addition to my herd and ALL are easy to work with and great moms.
 

nootka

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I got my "oldie but goodie" when she was 19. I didn't know at the time that she WAS 19, and I thought she was at death's door, then.

However, "Gramma Pony" as she was then called, rallied and is still here and I now know her true age, which is 32 years as of this past July. She is the healthiest horse we have, and my husband's favorite.

She's also mine for many of her qualities, not the least of which is her quiet patience tempered by a cheeky sense of humor and entitlement.

"well the horse has lots of exxpieriance but it may die soon."

Don't tell Gramma that! She's got a grandbaby to welcome in February: her 7th for us (and I know she has a few others out there by the studbook).

At those ages, I'd be more than happy to consider them if I were looking to buy.

Liz
 

Connie P

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I have a 35+ year old mare in my barn right now, so you could get lots of wonderful years with these precious mares. You never know when any animal is going to pass. I have a tender heart for the oldies. :)
 

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