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Tony

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I don't offer foaling suggestions often, but thought that I would share something that I learned one night this past week. I don't know if I knew this before and had forgotten, or just learned it for the first time. You'd think that after over 800 foals, I wouldn't still be learning, but I am. If I had know this I wouldn't have lost a gorgeous black pinto colt

When the beeper went off at 2:22 A.M., I went to the barn and Hocus Pocus was pushing and the bubble was out more than normal with no sign of a foot yet. I know that's not a good sign, so I immediately went in and found that everything was seemingly "normal", the feet and nose were in position, so I let her go for little longer, but she wasn't making progress that would be usual, so I broke the bag and pulled, but when I got the foal halfway out, I was afraid that it was hiplocked, so I twisted, rocking the foal back and forth and pulled again, HARD, with her next contraction. The I saw a back foot at his flank. I made a small attempt to push the back foot back in, but her contractions were so strong that I gave up quickly and tried to pull the back foot, hoping to straighten it up enough to deliver. I was fast becoming exhausted and went in and woke up Lauren to come help. We attempted a little longer, with Lauren holding the mare so that she was rolled up on her back, then finally at 3 A.M. I called the vet and described the situation, planning to take her in to him. He said that the only way to deliver this presentation was to get the back foot back inside. He said to lube up very well, and even if the foal had to go back in, I had to get the foot back. By this time we had the mare out in the yard on the way to the trailer. So I set about it, I lubed my arm all the way to the shoulder and finally was able to make it through the cervix and then came back to work the foot. It took all the strength that I had to be it back, having to push the foal's body back in about six inches, the foot finally popped free back inside the mare, which was a great relief. As soon as I came out, the foal slipped right out.

Unfortunately the umbilical chord was wrapped around the back foot and was pinched so long that by the time we got the foal out he was dead. We worked for about fifteen minutes, doing every trick that I know to try to get a heartbeat and breath started. He was alive when I got his "front half" out, but it had been almost forty-five minutes since that time. We finally gave up, but now know that if I had known I HAD to get the back foot back in place, I would have saved much time and probably the foal.

I am sorry that this is so long, but hopefully someone might remember this if they have the same situation happen sometime. Especially hated to lose him because he was the last foal off Too Incredible. At ;east we saved the mare and likely would have lost her if we hadn't been there.
 

Charlotte

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Tony, I'm very sorry you lost your last Too Incredible baby. but I am also very greatful that you took the time to give a good clear description of what you did and the results. I am going to send this information to others I know.

Charlotte
 

kaykay

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So sorry tony. A couple years ago we had almost the exact same dystocia. One back leg forward and the cord wrapped around his middle. We never could get the leg to go back and did finally get him out with the leg forward but like yours by that time he was gone. It was so much more heartbreaking because like yours he was alive when he was half way out. My vet said that is one of the hardest dystocias to deliver and was shocked we got him out.
 

Tami

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Thanks Tony, good to know. This very thing happened to me last year and I tried to push the foal and foot back and could not. My colt was alive to begin with too and I felt so bad losing him.
 

Miniv

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That was such a clear description, I was able to picture the entire thing......... Just wish it had had a happier outcome. Thank you for sharing.
 

BuckNappy

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So sorry for your loss Tony.Thank you for taking the time to share this helpful information.
 

MBhorses

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Tony,

I am so sorry for you loss. I am so glad your mare is okay. Would like to thank you for helping others during your loss.
 

Minimor

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We lost one that way last year too--our first dystocia ever-- only at least I did know the foal needed to go back in in order to free the foot before it could come out. Common sense told me that.

However, I was unable to push the foal back enough to get the foot free--it was a very big foal and there simply wasn't room. Had the foal been a small one it might have been different. The foal (which died early on) had to come out in pieces.
 

txminipinto

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Never experienced it but knew it was possible. The rear foot gets hung on the pelvis and so to dislodge it you must push the hoof up as you push the foal back. Sorry it didn't work out for you Tony!
 
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Dairygirl

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had the very same thing happen to me Monday night. Baby was too big to get back in to push the one leg back. Both legs were up but I did get one pushed back but not the other.

by the time the vet came the foal had died and the mare was almost on her way. no room to reach in so my vet used the calf puller to get the foal out. Not pretty at all but we saved the mare that that is what counts.

She is doing fine now.
 

Shaladar

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I had the same thing happen with a mare I was foaling out for a friend a couple of years ago. I tried and tried to get that leg back, and finally we just lubed up with everything we could find and I guided the foot out as my husband pulled. The only thing that saved the foal is that he was very small, and the mare was big and roomy. His cord was wrapped so tight it held the leg up against his belly, so there is no way I could of gotten the leg pushed back. The leg was warm when we unwrapped it...the cord was looped 3 or 4 times around the leg. He grew normally but always favored the leg and he was given to a Equestrian Center that helped disabled kids.

So sorry you lost the foal. I am sure the only thing that saved ours was that he was sooo small, and slipped out fairly easy.

Sue
 

Mona

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Tony, I am so sorry for your loss, but want to also thank you for sharing your story so that the rest of us may benefit from it.
 

Manyspots

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So sorry of your loss of the foal but happy you could save your mare. Thanks so much for sharing your experience with us as it may just save some foals in the future. Lavonne
 

Hosscrazy

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My mare Poppy (in my avatar) just went through a very similar delivery about 3 weeks ago. The baby did survive, and mom thankfully will be okay. She had some brusing and swelling in her uterus, but luckily no tears. Vet has been out twice, she was on antibiotics and is doing okay... that was honestly the only thing I cared about at that point...

I am so sorry about the baby, but thankfully your mare is okay.

Liz R.
 

horsehug

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Tony,

Thank you so much for sharing from your vast experience, like you always do with all of us.

I am so sorry you lost that beautiful baby.


Susan O.
 

Magic

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I'm so very sorry that you lost your last Incredible baby, Tony.


Your story of how it all happened made quite an impression on me (and on others it's clear) and I thank you for sharing it for the education of all us. What a nightmare it had to have been.
 

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