Pivot for showmanship class

Discussion in 'Miniature Horse Forum' started by Luv-My-Minis, Feb 21, 2007.

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  1. Feb 21, 2007 #1

    Luv-My-Minis

    Luv-My-Minis

    Luv-My-Minis

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    Hi Everyone,

    I would like some pointers for how to start training your horse to do the pivot required for showmanship classes? Do you set them up square or leave one hind foot in front of the other slightly? How do you get the horse to do this on command from the lead shank? I've seen some horses spin around so fast, it would make you dizzy and that right hind foot does not come off the ground!!

    Thanks in advance for your help,

    Linda [​IMG]
     
  2. Feb 21, 2007 #2

    Triple the Fun

    Triple the Fun

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    I'm interested too! Triple can't do it all that well, so I'm confused seeing that he does everything else with ease. Help us both! :lol: LOL
     
  3. Feb 22, 2007 #3

    JMS Miniatures

    JMS Miniatures

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    Well make sure you are standing at the horse's head when you do this. Just incase this is an obstacle horse as well. But repetition, thats pretty much will teach them. If they are just starting out they arent going to get it the first couple of times. Pretty much as long as they are moving their front end then thats all you can ask for and with time they will pretty much get it at a stand still.

    I just take their lead up by their nose or kind of tug on it and stand by their head and that tells them I want them to move their front end. If they are in your way still then tap on their shoulder and make them move. Like I said it doesn't have to look pretty but understanding what you want them too do and they will realize, oh you want me to get out of your way lol. Repetition, repetition, repetition, and you will get them doing an excellent pivot.

    Just don't think about them not moving, you just basiclly want them to get out of your way lol.
     
  4. Feb 22, 2007 #4

    justanothercowgirl

    justanothercowgirl

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    I set them up square and then with a horse just starting take hold of the side of their halter for maximum control (after a few times I switch to using the lead) and do whatever it takes to get a pivot without them moving their pivot foot...so very slow moves. I will ask them to move their front end away from me while keeping their head and neck in a straight line and crossing front left in front of right or behind whichever I think will help them keep their pivot foot in place from the position they are standing in. If they do that and their pivot foot stays they get praised-then I will repeat that process again, I also may ask them to move their left hind up to help them keep the right hind in place. Each time they make a small move for me and keep the pivot foot in place they get praised. I only start with a maximum of 180 pivots at first and work up to doing full 360. Slow steady work and lots of praise and before you know it they will be doing it for you with that foot planted in place.

    Pam
     
  5. Feb 22, 2007 #5

    Kendra

    Kendra

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    At first I use my hand on their shoulder as well as pressure on their lead to make sure they move their front end away from me, and don't just rubberneck. I want to show them how to do it correctly, I'll worry about reducing the amount of contact later. I also use a spoken cue, I say "circle", I've heard "turn" or "pivot" used as well, doesn't matter, you could say "purple" so long as you are consistant. I think the vocal cue is important, especially at first, because any horse I'm teaching to pivot is likely also learning to sidepass, and I want to make sure they're clear on what I'm asking them to do.

    After that it's just practice! Lots of praise when they get even a few steps right, gradually less "help" from me, and as always, short, consistant practice sessions.

    Thought of something else ... half the battle when you're trying to get a good pivot is getting yourself in the correct position for your horse. Be careful that you're not in the wrong place and forcing them to take a step back, or too far forward and they're all strung out and unable to keep that foot planted. It just takes practice, and every horse is different.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 22, 2007
  6. Feb 22, 2007 #6

    Jaxjag2000

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    I agree with what has been said. I usually use very small steps and try to keep the weight on that back foot so they do not have to move it. You have to be very aware of where you are standing too so you do not force the horse to move that back hoof. Start out with just a few steps at a time and then move to pivoting 90 degree, then 180, then 270, and finally 360. Keep the task small at first so your horse will succeed and learn what you want. It takes weeks, but it is well worth it! Just practice everyday and keep things consistant. Give LOTS of praise when your horse does it correctly!

    The book Showmanship with Miniature Horses will be a good resource for all who are interested in training for and showing in showmanship.

    Good luck!! Let us know how it goes!
     
  7. Feb 23, 2007 #7

    Sandee

    Sandee

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    If you've ever ridden, you know the weight is a factor for turns. In riding you'd tip your wieght back in the saddle to help get the horse's front end disengaged.

    Same thing works here even though you're not on their back. Get the head slightly up so the weight is off the front end and move into the horse or push the shoulder until they "get" the idea. But shifting the weight to the hind legs and moving slowly (until you both can do this blindfolded) is the esential move to keeping that hind foot in place.
     

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