Non horsey hubby needs a list

Miniature Horse Talk Forums

Help Support Miniature Horse Talk Forums:

Frankie

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2003
Messages
4,430
Reaction score
36
Location
Muncie, Indiana
My hubby is about as NON horsey as you can get. But bless his heart, he is taking a week of his vacations the week of nationals to make sure all the horses are well taken care of. I have been gone for a few days at a time before, but never a week. He did take care of them during those few days. They actually get better care, as he is so concerned something may happen while they are in his care.

He has been around for it all, has watched it all, but hasn't participated too much.

I need to get him lists together before I go. What I have been doing, is writing down all I do, taking notes, and will make his lists from there. But sometimes you just don't think of stuff.

2 different vets numbers are in 2 different places, and programed into his cell phone.

Two different kinds of grain is fed here, and those are all marked with names. Halters are on the wall, with the names of the horse it belongs to, he does know there names.

All were wormed this weekend. All feet will be done by the time I leave.

Did repairs on some fencing and latches, just to make sure.

What things can you think of that I may be missing or I may not think of.

Geeze, I have never left for this long before. I know they will be fine, but if you ever read any of my threads and know the things that happen here, I am kind of nervous.

Need to get the best of lists done, so I don't worry so much.
 

Marty

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
13,596
Reaction score
520
Location
Tennessee
Sounds like you got your bases covered. I can't beleive you get to go and leave us here alone on the anual Back Porch Road Trip!

What I would do is walk him through the actual routine with you am and pm. He'll see what you do and how you do it and that may help. Visual aids being what they are and all.....
 

wcr

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2004
Messages
859
Reaction score
11
Location
Rogue River, Oregon
Sounds like you have your bases covered but I would also have a horse oriented friend close by he can contact if he has questions or have the friend stop by and check on him. People who know horses can pick up things nonhorsey people can't.

My friend Sandy known here as sedeh has an extremely nonhorsey husband and tried to train him on what do do if a mare foals while she is at work. She is a good 30 minutes away and I said to have him call me if he had any problems and I would help until she could get there. Sure enough I got frantic calls one night telling me to wake up and answer the phone. Mind you, he has never even see a foal born and he had one foaling with a leg back. Luckily Michelle at Wesco had been present twice this year with this problem and the mares foal easily with the leg back so I talked a very frantic Doug through the delivery. Everything went well but we still laugh at the things I could hear him saying when he laid down the phone and helped the mare.

As I said, a horsey friend would be an asset just to keep an eye on things.
 
L

Lisa-Ruff N Tuff Minis

Guest
I would have a very clear scheudle what horses get fed in what order ect - I write mine out on a time line. I also hav horsey friends coming by almost daily to check the horses and notice things they may not and my vet is ready for any call and knows get here no matter what and handle it for me
 

strass

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2005
Messages
507
Reaction score
0
Location
Po-Dunk, Oklahoma
As a once "non-horsey husband", I can tell you that the most important thing is to check your cell phone often. There's no way to keep it with you at all times at Nationals, but try to make it a point to look at it once an hour.

He probably won't need it, but calling back promptly will ease his nerves should he have a question. It'll also increase you chances of him watching them for you in the future.

Oh, and tell him you love him by bringing him home a present. (hint-hint, Lisa)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Magic

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2002
Messages
4,462
Reaction score
3
Dang, Strass, just read your signature, and you may "only be a stable boy" but the horse in your avatar is BREATH-TAKING!! Hubba hubba!!!
 

JO~*

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2004
Messages
905
Reaction score
0
Location
Northwest California
If he doesn’t already know I would be sure to tell him things NOT to do, like what would happen if he gives them too much grain.
 

Cathy_H

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
2,113
Reaction score
0
To always go back & double check all gates, locks & doors to MAKE SURE everything is secure even if he thinks it is.
 

Aggravation Acres

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2004
Messages
316
Reaction score
2
Location
Townville Pa.
Does he know how to long on to the forum?

He could always ask questions here, like the rest of us


Deb
 
Last edited by a moderator:

ChrystalPaths

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 31, 2003
Messages
8,277
Reaction score
1
I just did this as a "just in case something happens" kinda thing.

I typed out each horse's info, name, halter color, "horse's color...like "Treasure...BIG light color palomino mare...green halter...am feeding: 1 yellow cup Equine Adult w 1/2c Complete Advantage(mix in big red scoop) 1/2 flake hay pm feeding: 1 yellow cup Equine Adult w/ 1/2c complete advantage 1small flake hay and so on. Each stall is labeled and has this page of info tacked on it.

I also very clearly told/wrote in what order they should come in and go out if needed. I tend to be like you and my insturctions sound almost rude but thems my kids and if someone else had to come take care of them better they have too much as opposed to too little info.

Be sure he has vet numbers, horse friends numbers, knows how to log on here if needed. You are welcome to my phone # if you like even though I'm a loong way away.

I'd make sure he does at least 2 days worth of walk with you while you do it.

I have lots of bedding ready, hay is available and 150# of feed. Katrina taught me not to ever get caught with my pants down..so to speak. Have fun Carolyn and kiss Miss Prints for me.
 

scout

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2004
Messages
49
Reaction score
0
I can't say that I know your way of doing things, but I know that I like to leave a list of who gets turned out with who and where they get turned out. I have several paddocks and all of my horses don't get along well. Just a thought, if your kids are like mine.
 

Gameela

Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2005
Messages
19
Reaction score
0
Location
Bloxom, VA
I second having a horsey friend that he can call in case he needs to, having them come check things a couple times wouldn't be a bad idea.

Write down signs of founder, colic, show him how to take a temp., etc. If horse has any previous health issues, make sure he knows what they are and what to watch out for.

Like everyone else said, make a LONG, annoying list of where each horse goes, who goes in their pastures/dry lots first and last, and specifically who comes in first and last when he is bringing them in, what they are fed & how much, etc.

I try to be as thorough as possible when writing directions. If he ISN'T familar with colors of horses, a chestnut could be RED, bay would be brown, a paint/pinto would be blank color with white spots everywhere. I also write down distinct markings of each horse. If he forgets their names amongst the chaos, he can go by their markings. Take him with you atleast once through everything, if nothing else, it'll make him feel a little more comfortable seeing things done once before you leave.

Leave your farriers number as well, in case he needs it for any reason.

The reason I say to make a list of which horses come out first is because he could easily be injured grabbing the wrong horse to take out and the rest coming after the other horse. I work at a boarding stable, the most common place to get injured is when you are trying to bring in a specific horse from a pasture. Even people who DO have horse sense often DON'T realize that this can and does happen. I bring in whatever horse comes to the gate and stands their ground at the gate, why? Because I'm less likely to be injured as well as the horse. There are several that still act 'mean' even after you take them out of the gate (they still try to go after the horses coming up to the gate), so, I have to firmly tell them to knock it off and be nice. I've also almost been injured by horses mis-behaving while I close the gate (only with certain horses that don't pay attention to where you are and aggressively try to get a horse on the other side of the fence - even if your standing there).

While your horses may not be agressive in any way towards each other (unlikely), him having this list will make things a WHOLE lot easier. Also, when I have to bring in a specific horse, that isn't in the first 3 for pecking order, I use a different gate. Often, the horses don't realize I'm taking a horse out if I use the opposite gate and they leave us alone.....could also be an option for you if you have another gate.

I also agree to double check all gate latches and also to make sure that all fencing is still up. Have him check on the horses a couple times as well, just to do a head count and look for anything suspiscious with the horses.

Show him how to wrap a leg if he needs to, common first aid practices, etc.

Have fun!!!!!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

AJ

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2002
Messages
271
Reaction score
11
Frankly, I consider all you women with these seemingly fragile horses (horsettes) totally irresponsible to entrust them to us non responsible, incompetent, non caring , untrainable, short memoried, nerdy male species. So, if you want to enjoy your get away, at least get another female to look after them, you will be glad you did.
 

dannigirl

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2004
Messages
1,316
Reaction score
55
Location
Southern Illinois
Sometimes we just worry too much. Unless there is a reason to think one may need special assistance (already colicy or ready to foal) your horses will probably be just fine. As long as he knows what to feed and what a healthy horse looks like, he will know if someone is looking or acting strange and then he can call for help. He has the vet #'s so he should be fine. I have often told my neighbor that in case of emergency, just make sure they all get something to eat and more important, make sure they have water and the gates and doors are all closed.

Don't let worry cloud your fun on the trip and have a good time. We are letting our horses with a 19 yr old neighbor boy doing the feeding and such and two other adult neighbors checking in often. I feel confident that all will be well.

Angie
 

Latest posts

Top