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Sheila

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Hi everyone, I am a new owner of miniature horses and also new to this forum. I am really looking forward to learning all I can about my wonderful little babies. I bought my 1st mini last spring as a yearling filly and she has been so wonderful and great with my kids and myself I just had to get another one. So a few weeks ago I wanted to get a gelding and at the last minute found out that this little guy is not developed enough to be gelded but decided to get him anyway and hope for the best. Now I am tossing around the idea of possibly breeding these two in a few years, then having him gelded. Someone just told me don't do it, because once the stallion is bred to my female they will never be able to be put together again because even if he is gelded he will alway chase her around. If this is true I will have him gelded as soon as possible, (I bought him so they could be companions). Thanks for listening

Sheila
 

_minihorses4ever_

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I would geld him as soon as he drops his jewels
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. I wouldn't risk your beloved filly, just to breed her.
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By the way, WELCOME to the forums!
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Jacquee'

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Hi Sheila, and welcome!!!

Sometimes geldings will have a really good memory about breeding behaviours and can become unsuitable companions for a mare. If you really want to keep them together, my advice would be to geld this stallion, "just in case". It could turn out that he has a good memory.

Now, you can STILL breed your mare!!!! Believe me, there are PLENTY of really gorgeous studs out there that you can have your mare bred to. A lot of these handsome fellows are show champions and have many offspring to prove their worth. For your time and money, breeding to the closest really nice stallion is the best way to go. You get all the benefits (a foal to love) with none of the headaches that stallions can bring on. And let me just say, an extra added benefit is meeting the breeder who owns the stallion, who can give you a lot of tips. Later on, when you have more experience with the horses, you just may decide that you would like to take on the challenge of owning a stallion. At that time, you will have a better idea what qualities you would like in a stallion. After all, just because a stallion can get your mare pregnant, does not mean he is suitable material. It can take a while to train your eye, so that you will know "Mr. Right" when you see him.

So I guess my advice is take it slow, take a look around, geld your new boy and love him. He will always be able to be in with the mares, if you geld him young enough. And most of all, have fun with your minis!
 

Songcatcher

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Hi, welcome to the Forum from Oklahoma. You didn't say how old this little guy is. I would not let them run together until he is gelded. If he has dropped one, he can breed her. And, he can drop them very quickly. If he has one retained, he can still breed her and that is not a characteristic you would want to pass on.

You will get lots of information here on the Forum. Some you will agree with and some not. Good luck.
 

Sonya

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Welcome to the forum, can't help you with the questions though, I am not a breeder. Would love to see some pics when you get a chance.
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Bluerocket

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Welcome to the forum from North Central Kentucky.

We geld them as young as 3 weeks here... when the vet rolls them over on their backs the goodies often (not always) pop up to be available for gelding.

I have several late gelded horses that were allowed to breed earlier in their lives.. most of them I bought as geldings... one of them was my breeding stallion before he was gelded.... They all remember how to breed and are very very very actively interested in the mares when they are in season.
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Good luck whatever you choose to do.

JJay
 

Sheila

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Thanks everyone. I really appreciate the advice. I must admit I reluctantly agree with you. I had been thinking what a cute foal these two would make together, but if it means risking them not being able to be pasture mates then I will have to have him gelded as soon as possible. I will send pictures soon. Thanks again.

Sheila
 

MyLilShowGirl

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Welcome to the forum!! Nice to meet you!

Look forward to seeing pics!

-Kris
 

Thunder

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Hi there!

Welcome to the forum!
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Sincerely,

Va Lynda Ann
 

midnight star stables

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welcome!
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guys really mellow out when they gelded... I'm not a breeder, so I don't see why you don't breed them, I know of 2 stallions that were both herd stallions for that farm, but when they were going out of business, they had both studs gelded, then a month or so they were turned out together with most thier mares untill they all sold...no troubles there...

they are all diferent though

desiree
 

~Palomino~

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Jacquee said:
Hi Sheila, and welcome!!!
Sometimes geldings will have a really good memory about breeding behaviours and can become unsuitable companions for a mare. If you really want to keep them together, my advice would be to geld this stallion, "just in case". It could turn out that he has a good memory.

Now, you can STILL breed your mare!!!! Believe me, there are PLENTY of really gorgeous studs out there that you can have your mare bred to. A lot of these handsome fellows are show champions and have many offspring to prove their worth. For your time and money, breeding to the closest really nice stallion is the best way to go. You get all the benefits (a foal to love) with none of the headaches that stallions can bring on. And let me just say, an extra added benefit is meeting the breeder who owns the stallion, who can give you a lot of tips. Later on, when you have more experience with the horses, you just may decide that you would like to take on the challenge of owning a stallion. At that time, you will have a better idea what qualities you would like in a stallion. After all, just because a stallion can get your mare pregnant, does not mean he is suitable material. It can take a while to train your eye, so that you will know "Mr. Right" when you see him.

So I guess my advice is take it slow, take a look around, geld your new boy and love him. He will always be able to be in with the mares, if you geld him young enough. And most of all, have fun with your minis!

444241[/snapback]

thats what I was thinking!!!!

I would just have your yearling filly bread WHEN she turns three to another breeders stallion!

But like i said, you should atleast wait till she is three, breeding at two is realy risky, some people do this, but you should know how to deleiver babies really easy if you are going to do this, OH and if you have the extra money to get another mini, I would get another brood mare that has allready had foals and that will have on easaly, verse a madien filly (first time pregnant) it could get stuck and both her and the foal would die, not saying this cant happen with a prooven mare, but it is most likeley to happen on a maiden mare, and you need to know what your doing when something like that happens!

If I was you, I would sell your little colt and buy another brood mare!

JMO!

And Welcome to the forum!!
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-Gage-
 

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