Need to Vent. Many colics, no answers

Discussion in 'Miniature Horse Forum' started by candycar, Jan 11, 2019.

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  1. Mar 8, 2019 #21

    Cayuse

    Cayuse

    Cayuse

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    Poor little dude! Sending some healing vibes his way. I wonder if he gets a sudden gas build up?
    I hope you can keep us posted as to what his management changes will be.
     
  2. Mar 9, 2019 #22

    patrpbfl

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    Have you had your hay analyzed, for sugar,starch and especially for nitrates? EquiAnalytical does hay analysis. I have two mini's, one of them having been diagnosed in 2011 as insulin resistant. Since then I had both on a low sugar/low starch diet of orchard or timothy hay, depending on availability, and timothy pellets, and they were doing great until last year when my mare became laminitic.

    Long story short, after much struggle, MANY vets bills, and so much pain on my mares part, we were able to track down high nitrates in their hay. I had only been having a regular analysis done, which does NOT include nitrates, so we were unaware of how high the nitrates actually were, which turned out to be 2200 PPM, which is toxic. This is toxic to any animal and can kill a cow. Horses are much less sensitive to nitrates than cows or goats, so my minis were able to tolerate it, but with consequences that I then had to deal with. I can't tell you how stupid I felt when I got that analysis result back.

    I read that nitrates fluctuate in the hay, depending on the weather when it is cut, whether it is irrigated, what it is fertilized with; so many variables. My timothy and orchard hays had been coming from the western part of the US and I was told that the severe weather they have been having the past few years had affected the hay crops. I now feed coastal grass hay and test every new load for nitrates before feeding it. You can soak it in water to reduce nitrates, but that is very difficult in winter weather for many people.

    Anyway, if the blood tests for insulin resistance have not been done ( glucose, insulin and leptin ) I would consider having them done. It's much less expensive and easier than dealing with a colic. Also make sure that the blood samples are handled correctly in order to get accurate results; I'm pretty sure they need to be frozen and shipped on ice. I think Cornell U is the only place to get a leptin run.

    Sorry this has been so long, but if I can help keep someone from going through what my mare had to go through, it is a good thing. She's much better now, but it's been a long six months journey. Good luck with your boy. He's beautiful!
     
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  3. Mar 9, 2019 #23

    Cayuse

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    How is Rock E today?
     
  4. Mar 9, 2019 #24

    MyBarakah

    MyBarakah

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    I know they can colic allot due to ulcers. Has he been treated as if he has ulcers?
     
  5. Mar 10, 2019 #25

    candycar

    candycar

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    Rock E is doing fine. Still at Rood & Riddle. Everybody loves him. The Vet that did the surgery thinks he may not be ready 'till Tues. They are doing more blood tests today. I really can't get much info from the surgery Vet. I'll have to wait 'till his primary gets back Mon. :-( I already have transport lined up for Mon. afternoon, but may have a back-up option. We all really miss him! The barn looks so empty and the girls just mope around.
     
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  6. Mar 13, 2019 at 7:00 AM #26

    candycar

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    Rock E Update 2: He's home! My friend and I picked him yesterday (12Mar) afternoon. He looks very slim :) The girls are happy to see him.
    Surgery: Exploratory Laparotomy & pelvic enterotomy to evaluate large colon
    Diagnosis: Colic- right dorsal colitis (thickening of colon wall) It may get better in time.
    Recommendations & instructions: Stall rest with hand walking, little grazing for 30 days. In a few months he may be allowed to eat hay.
    Don't feed hay at this time. Feed Equine Senior (Purina or Nutrena Safe Choice) 3-4 lbs a day.
    Added supplements: Platinum Healthy Weight oil (10 ml 2Xaday) Platinum Performance GI (1/2 scoop a day) Can give 300-400 mg Simethicone 3-4 Xday if he gets gas. Avoid Banamine or Bute.

    It's going to be hard for a while especially during feed times separating and timing things. At least it's not too hot yet for his stall rest and when I have to lock him up at night.
     
    Ryan Johnson, KLJcowgirl and chandab like this.
  7. Mar 13, 2019 at 7:43 AM #27

    Marsha Cassada

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    That is a challenging regimen. Hope his troubles are over.
     
  8. Mar 13, 2019 at 9:08 AM #28

    Cayuse

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    Glad he is home. Simethicone is awesome for gas, sometimes I give it to my guys in tablet form and they gobble it up like it is a treat.
    No hay is hard. You can't explain it to them that it is for their own good :(. At some point, when he is healed up, will you be able to introduce hay pellets?
     
  9. Mar 13, 2019 at 9:10 AM #29

    Willow Flats

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    Glad to hear Rock E is home! May he continue to improve daily. Enjoy your walks with him :)
     
  10. Mar 13, 2019 at 11:18 AM #30

    candycar

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    Cayuse, I hope to get him on/back to his regular feed at some point, which includes hay pellets. I need to find the simethicone in a form he can take. He hates mint flavors and spits them out. I'll look into infant liquid I can syringe into him.
     
  11. Mar 16, 2019 at 1:52 PM #31

    amyjo

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    Hi,
    I had a regular size horse with digestion problems (i.e. runny, sudden bowel movements like soup) and one vet said, oh, it's stress (for 2/12 horse very calm and level-headed); asked another vet, oh, he's in training; he was not being over worked.

    I had a blood test pulled testing for food and environment allergies. bingo: allergic to oats, molasses, corn, bran.

    This was like 15 years ago and feeds were not as specialty as they are now. I switched to Cool Balance from flint river farms or kentucky university (something like that) and 100 percent improved. cool balance is a low starch hay based pellet.

    It's similar to a medical doctor who doesn't believe in chiropractic care. Either they do or they don't; there's no in between. Chiropractic works and sometimes we need to be a detective to find answers and the internet and more particularly this forum is the greatest source to start one in the right direction.

    Keep looking for answers. It's out there, you just have to get there!
     
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  12. Mar 16, 2019 at 1:55 PM #32

    amyjo

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  13. Mar 16, 2019 at 1:57 PM #33

    amyjo

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    Hi,
    If soaking hay to remove dirt, allergens, dust, et cetera, try steaming. I use a wallpaper steamer, make a hole in a plastic tote and steam for 20 minutes or so depending on volume. They love steamed hay but it is possible to oversteam and it becomes like seaweed.

    To be more specific, I soak hay for five minutes, drain, steam for 22 mins, drain, serve. so much dirt comes out it is amazing. My mini has breathing issues and this helps tremendously.
     
  14. Mar 16, 2019 at 2:02 PM #34

    amyjo

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    There is a great product out there in pellet form which they will eat called U-GARD which horse journal gave great reviews. comes in liquid as well. not terribly expensive.

    U-GARD makes pellet form and very palatable. i used it for years with good results. not too expensive.
     

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