Narcoleptic foal?

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Field-of-Dreams

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We had a mare foal a nice bay filly on Tues evening. Maiden mare, my friend watched her on camera during dinner, nothing, then when she did the dishes, she had an extra set of legs!

But: she seems narcoleptic. While we were waitinfg for Mom to recover, all of a sudden baby just tipped over and was flat. Still breathing but I couldn't get her to wake up! Finally she did, but it was odd. She did this several times during the evening while we did post-foaling checks & watching.

Once she was on her feet, she seemed fine. Found the snack bar quite quickly. Passed her meconium. Laid down normally for a nap. She likes people and seems to be a sweetie. No problems or struggles to dip her navel in the iodine.

Then yesterday, when I went to feed, she was sleeping. I went to check on her and couldn't get her to wake up! It was like moving a dead foal- head just hung, floppy sack of beans. I laid her back down, then shortly after I looked in and she was up and bouncing! My friend had to blanket her in the morning (it got COLD!) and said she did the same thing.

We've never had one like this. Mom is sorta indifferent to her, lets her nurse and all but not motherly. Never even licked her off. From what I've read, I believe it'll pass in a few weeks, but does anyone else have sleepy baby stories? Just to make me feel better...

And I have to add the FUNNIEST story: she had nursed a good amount, so naturally things began to "move".... she's standing in the corner, and she was trying so hard to poop she went a** over head and did a flip! I wish I'd had a camera- it was like someone just took her by the hind feet and flipped her over. I thought I was going to wet my pants I was laughing so hard.... she stood up and finished like it was nothing. I felt bad for her, but it was SOO funny!

Bad pic- camera phone. I'm having trouble connecting to the internet at home, AOL is FUBAR...

0409132123.jpg
 
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Eagle

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Congrats on your new filly
I had a colt last year that would pass out, he would just go limp as you said. It frightened the wits out of me the first few times, i would rub and stimulate him but it didn't seem to make much difference. He too was a real bouncy, happy little thing. He had more problems than your little one though cos he couldn't feed on his own either, every time he turned his head to get at the nipple he would pass out. After a week his light just seemed to switch on and I never had any other problems.

Good luck.

P.S there was a fainter born on MS last night if you want to take a look.
 
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Reignmaker Miniatures

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We had one like that. She only did it when she was handled/restrained in some way. I used to call her my 'fainting goat' because if anything stressed her she'd go limp like that. She too grew out of it in short order and there were no lasting problems because of it. Lucky for her she was a domestic horse because in the wild she'd have been toast if every time she was a bit stressed she fainted instead of running. Interestingly enough she too was a cheerful curious little thing.
 

JAX

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I had one that would faint when restrained or sometimes just playing and at a full run would just fall over and sleep. Exactly as you describe you could not wake him up!! When awake he was normal. Outgrew it without a problem. My vet said that narcolepsy is much more common in minis and that they normally outgrow it. Do watch where the waterer is... dont want her to accidently go to sleep with her head in it!!
 

BSharpRanch

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I remember watching a wildlife show on zebras (I believe) once. They showed a lion grab a foal. The second the foal hit the ground it was gone. They stated that foals (in the wild but I presume our domestic friends too) have a mechanism in their brains that will switch off everything, including pain. Mother natures way of being "humane" while the animal is dying supposedly so the animal doesn't suffer.
 

Miniv

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We've had a few "fainters" over the years -- interestingly all were colts. But all out grew it in a few days.
 

Ridgerunner

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We had a fainter colt a few years ago. If you restrained him in any way, he'd go limp as a dishrag! Scared the bejeebers out of me at first. You couldn't wake him up till he was ready, then he was fine. He also was a friendly, inquisitive little feller. He outgrew it in a couple of weeks.
 

Leeana

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I bought a weanling colt that was born with narcolepsy - his name was "Narko" LOL

His breeder said that his first few days, weeks, were rough..I got him when he was 5 months old. Never had any issues with him ever.
 

valshingle

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Be careful - my vet has warned me that this can be a symptom of septicemia. I've had some do this and they all required careful monitoring. Try honey or Karo syrup to keep his blood sugar up.
 

Field-of-Dreams

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She seemed fine this weekend, no fainting at all! Turned outside for a few hours and was doing "orbits" around her mom.
 

wildoak

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The few we have had also outgrew it in short order, aged me a little in the course of it though. My understanding is that it's probably due to an immature nervous system. Have not heard the link to septicemia before... Something to remember.

Jan
 

Field-of-Dreams

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The few we have had also outgrew it in short order, aged me a little in the course of it though. My understanding is that it's probably due to an immature nervous system. Have not heard the link to septicemia before... Something to remember.

Jan
She did seem a little "undercooked".... she's fine now, though!
 

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