More Help! Throwing a Fit during Hoof Care

Discussion in 'Miniature Horse Forum' started by HollynIvysMomma, Dec 1, 2013.

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  1. Dec 1, 2013 #1

    HollynIvysMomma

    HollynIvysMomma

    HollynIvysMomma

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    So we've had the mini babies a little more than a month and so we went to trim their feet today. The previous owners had gotten them used to picking their feet up, and I'd been picking up their feet to check them and keep them used to it. Today, Dad went to trim them bc they looked a little long and we want to keep them up well.

    So they did Holly first, the little brown filly, and she was perfect.

    Then...it was Ivy's turn, and she started rearing and flipping out, which surprised us bc she didn't mind at all when we had picked her feet up. Dad eventually got her calmed down enough to finish, but it was an ordeal.

    So, my question is...what's the best course of action when that happens? Should we cross tie her? We didn't even try it this first time bc the girls were usually so calm we weren't expecting problems.

    Any and all advice is appreciated!
     
  2. Dec 1, 2013 #2

    MyMiniGal

    MyMiniGal

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    Halo reared with one farrier. I figured out why...he would stand and trim. The next farrier we tried, he kneels down and trims...absolutely no problems at all. Plus, I think she just plain likes the guy. LOL But, it could be something as simple as how your dad is standing. But she does need to realize that rearing isn't acceptable. I will let more experienced people say how to deal with that, as I am anxious to read it myself.
     
  3. Dec 1, 2013 #3

    HollynIvysMomma

    HollynIvysMomma

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    Ivy is apparently going to be our spunky girl. She is the one who was nipping a few days ago, but she hasn't done that since I told her no and pushed her away.
     
  4. Dec 1, 2013 #4

    MyMiniGal

    MyMiniGal

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    I think they all go through testing stages..no matter how old they are. LOL I know Halo has, on and off. But she is learning that we are alpha and she isn't, so she is much better than she was with things. Really tries to please now.
     
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  5. Dec 1, 2013 #5

    disneyhorse

    disneyhorse

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    Hopefully you are all being ergonomic minded when picking up feet... Minis have very short legs and they only bend comfortably so high.

    If the horse is just being a jerk... Hold on and don't let go until YOU say you're done. Young horses don't have a lot of patience and need to learn what is expected of them.
     
  6. Dec 1, 2013 #6

    MyMiniGal

    MyMiniGal

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    Yes, one thing, that I have been telling my husband, as he wants to clean Halo's hooves, is to make sure he keeps her leg under her, and just bends up the hoof a little ways. If he pulls too far out, she gets unbalanced and has a hard time letting him do what he wants and tries to put her foot down. She hasn't reared with us, and only that one time, with that one farrier, that I know of. Well, I mean, rearing as far as when something is being done with her hooves. She has reared with us and lunging, but that has stopped also, once we didn't let her get away with it.
     
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  7. Dec 1, 2013 #7

    Tab

    Tab

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    I agree, sometimes you just need to hold on and win the battle, it is exhausting but they learn to submit. You aren't hurting them, you are simply doing what you have to do. This is why I love to train foals when they are really little to stand for trimming. However, it is perfectly normal for a horse to have trouble with new handlers. It's almost to be expected. They haven't built trust with that new person yet and also like to see what they can get away with [​IMG]
     
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  8. Dec 1, 2013 #8

    BSharpRanch

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    Horses are prey animals. They are also claustrophobic (sp)? Stay low, go slow, stay calm and avoid a fight. I find if you start forcing them to stand by snubbing them, laying on them, holding them tight around their necks, etc, they will fight like mad thinking you want to eat them. Keep them calm and comfortable and there shouldn't be much of a problem.
     
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  9. Dec 1, 2013 #9

    HollynIvysMomma

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    Thanks everyone! I didn't think he was pulling her leg too high, but maybe next time we will try kneeling. Then we'd be lower and less threatening, and would be less likely to pull her leg too high. Plus, probably be easier on our backs! [​IMG]
     
  10. Dec 1, 2013 #10

    happy appy

    happy appy

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    I don't think I would be off my feet until you know she wont rear up. You wont be able to get safely out of the way on your knees.
     
  11. Dec 1, 2013 #11

    Minimor

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    How was he holding the foot? Between his legs, below his knees? Or did he have her foot higher? When I trim I either kneel or I hold the foot low down, below my knees, well below if the horse is very small, a bit closer to the knee if it is a taller Mini. I pretty much always kneel when I do the hind feet, it is the only way that is really comfortable for me and the horse. With the minis you don't want to have the foot pulled out too much to the side either--that is not comfortable for them.

    If the horse really objects to having the foot held between my legs then I just hold it with my left hand and trim with the right. Once the horse is used to the snipping that way, there is usually no objection to having the foot tucked between my legs and held that way.
     
  12. Dec 1, 2013 #12

    AnnaC

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    I agree with everyone, low, slow and calm, and keep the feet as near under the mini as possible to avoid unbalancing them. I certainly wouldn't tie a mini that might rear anyway, but also cross tying has to be taught carefully and is not something that can be 'just done'.

    You are doing a fabulous job with your new babies, especially as they are so young and haven't been with you very long. [​IMG]
     
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  13. Dec 3, 2013 #13

    wingnut

    wingnut

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    You keep at it. You stay calm. I would not tie up myself as I find this makes them more anxious. I'd spend some really specific time working with her and her feet, including pretending to file/nip. If you're dad is your farrier, if possible, get him out there handling her at least a couple times a week.

    Thankfully, our farrier is quite accustomed to all potential behaviors. He patiently waits them out. They don't get away with it. They are gently handled with firmness and consistency until they figure out the trim is going to happen no matter how silly they act up.

    My favorite time was when our one mare, who was approaching two at the time (and had had her feet trimmed many times up to that point) decided that she would try laying down to get out of the trim. Didn't work :p
     
  14. Dec 3, 2013 #14

    Magic Marker Minis

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    We've had a couple of young ones rear on us... We just hold them up on their hind legs for a couple of minutes, until they figure out they really didn't want to rear up... It's worked both times and they stopped rearing.

    But, you really do have to make sure you're holding the foot low enough and underneath them enough so they aren't unbalanced... That seems to be the hardest lesson to learn if you're used to big horses...
     
  15. Dec 3, 2013 #15

    Marty

    Marty

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    Do not ever cross tie a horse that you think is going to rear.
     
  16. Dec 4, 2013 #16

    bevann

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    when our babies were young and just starting on foot care we always put them next to a wall.I put some rings on the wall and made some short ties.With the halter on and head tied relatively close to the wall and farrier on the side he was trimming it calmed down the rearing.Did 1 side them turned the horse around and did the other side.This method was also used for giving shots always in the rear butt muscle with tail lifted slightly off the ground.
     
  17. Dec 4, 2013 #17

    wildoak

    wildoak

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    Be cautious about kneeling... You can't get out of the way quickly if you need to, and It's a good way to get a hoof in the face if you aren't pretty sure of their behavior yet. Otherwise yes, slow and quiet, lots of short sessions every day you can. You do want your horse to be convinced that you have won the dispute, but if they really get to thrashing around its possible to injure a leg, esp back legs, by holding on to them too forcefully. Patience and common sense go a long way.. [​IMG]

    Jan
     
  18. Dec 5, 2013 #18

    Carolyn R

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    I did not read all the comments, but I will attest to what I have researched and what had worked for me. Keep in mind, this was also for a BH, my gypsy vanner, while she was halter broke, keep in mind, many young gypsy vanners, especially those imported, have not had much done as far as hoof care goes.

    First, as stated, you are the alpha, period. Being the alpha is not just about being firm, but it is also about being fair. In other words, you are only as assertive as the situation calls for. If a loud no and a stomping action into their space is all that is needed, then so be it. If they bite, kick or turn their rear towards me, then that is gonna get a much more aggressive/ protective response from me, including making contact with them, just an action I will not tolerate.

    Next, while the previous owner worked with them, the relationship now is about them and their new counterparts in their new environment. This means you need to earn their trust. Lifting their legs and placing them in a vulnerable position will take trust. Tie, let them relax for a few minutes, it doesn't take long, just spend 3-4 minutes brushing them out, then work your way down their leg, and gently lift, even if you only get the foot up an inch and they want to place it back down, let them, and praise them. Repeat it every day, several times a day, they will realize that they can trust you, once the trust is built that you will not have an issue. You are still new to one another, if it was them being a spunky idiot after 2 years of ownership it is a different story. Right now, it is all about your relationship with them and in turn trusting you when you put them in a precarious situation, remember, they are flight animals. Show them you will release them from pressure (in this case, holding their hoof) when they are uncertain, they will let you increase the time and height you lift their feet once the trust is there. Your father will also need to do this if he is the one doing the trimming.
     
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