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Cayuse

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MerMaeve, I put him on Remission and some Magrestore and started exercise for muscle tone (he was not fat, just out of shape and the neck floppy). Long lining him helped. I was probably lucky that it returned to normal, but I was happy it did.
 

Abby P

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Couple more thoughts...

For the fallen crest - did you feel it (put your hand across the top and pinch)? Is it thick, ridgy, hard? Is there substance there? Or does it seem like it could just be a heavy mane pulling the ligament over to the side? This would be a very important bit of information to have. If there is substance there then that's going to be fat, and metabolic fat. Horses don't build muscle up there and a cresty neck is a sign of IR. But again, without knowing the situation, it's hard to predict how big of an issue it might be - if he came recently out of a situation where he was out on acres and acres of spring grass, that would have me a lot less concerned than if he's been in the dry lot for a long time and still has a big crest. Is he overweight otherwise? Some horses can't tolerate alfalfa.

Second, you have to consider what you are able and willing to do and how much you're willing to alter your plans for the horse based on his health and training needs. You're going to have surprises ANYWAY with a new horse. For example, what is the boarding situation going to be like? Will the only turnout available be grass pasture? That's not a good situation for a metabolic horse. If this will be your only horse, and you wanted to be able to get going right away with doing stuff or have a kid and this will be their pony, that's a lot more to give up than if you were just looking for the experience of horse ownership and doing whatever you are able to do with the horse. You can probably get there either way but when it's your only horse it's a lot more difficult to start out with issues unless you're the sort of person who enjoys the journey. :)

I definitely agree that having a vet look at him is a great idea, it will give you a much better picture of what you're dealing with and you can take that information and your boarding situation into consideration and decide whether it will all work out well or not. Good luck and please let us know what you end up deciding - he sounds very sweet and hopefully all of the issues are easily manageable!
 

Capriole

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I felt it while petting him (like I said, all I could remember reading about it, from a long, long time ago, was that it seemed to be mostly a cosmetic issue) it felt pretty soft, I don't think his mane is heavy enough to pull it over, but, I don't know for sure....I guess if the ligament is stretched it may not take much to pull it over.
I talked to her yesterday about it, she said he was overweight when she got him, the people that owned him just kept him penned up and she said she thought they were giving him grain. She did say the vet examined him when she first got him and said he didn't see anything to be concerned about.
He has lost weight and is in much better shape now.

No, no grassy pastures here, he'd be on a dry lot ....mostly.. weeds crop up here and there. I thought I would continue the slow feeder...I agree with her that it is a much healthier, natural way for them to eat....he seems to be doing well with it.

I feel bad...I'm afraid I offended her (she said she wasn't offended...but....)
I don't think he has any issues now...I'm just concerned that he may be prone to developing metabolic issues...if I could keep him at home and monitor him as closely as would be necessary (if he was prone to metabolic issues) that would be different...but, having to board, I just wouldn't be able to do that.
You know how people are ....even if you have a "Do not feed" sign there are people that are going to be all "Oh my God! Look at the cute little horse....one apple isn't going to hurt" then someone else does the same, etc.
After going through some of the trials of my sister in law's IR / laminitic horse it seems to me the condition is notoriously unstable (of course that was a full blown issue...not just a "could" issue), maybe I'm being overly cautious because I never want to see a horse go through that again.
I really like him, but, I don't want to put him in a situation that could put him at risk. As much as I would love to have him I could live without him....but, selfishly putting him in a situation I couldn't guarantee (as much as possible) his health/safety could cost him his life or put him through a lot of suffering.

Anyway, she, again, said I was welcome to get a vet check or do anything I needed to feel comfortable...I just feed bad that I may have offended her....she is so nice....and she is literally saving these horses lives.
 

Cayuse

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You probably did not offend her one bit, in fact she might be happy that you are voicing your concerns as it shows you have the knowledge to care for the animal. As far as the laminitis worry goes, I understand how you feel, my pony is going through it and it's difficult. But not all are metabolic and not every metabolic horse gets laminitis.
It all depends on your comfort level. I personally would have him vetted and go from there, but that's just me and he sounds like the type of horse I like :). Plus you have a dry lot which is awesome!
 

JFNM miniatures

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Ditto to what Cayuse said, I don't think you have offended her. The more questions you ask, the more it means you want what is best for the horse. I think a vet check would just be a normal thing to do. It will probably help you with your decision, and you can always ask the vet his opinion on his future lifestyle, needs, care etc. if you want to buy him. Maybe his management won't be very different from another horse, except maybe to slow feed (like you were saying), soaking hay and making sure he doesn't have access to grass.... normal things a boarding property will usually do if need be.
 

Abby P

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To be honest I think that most, if not all, ponies are IR to some degree - and certainly not most ponies ever have laminitis. If you have a dry lot and the ability to have the barn not feed him grain, then that is probably going to cover you pretty well. Grass and grain are really the two main culprits, followed by other medical issues (too many vaccines at the same time, another illness or injury, certain medications, Cushing's), when there is no prior history of laminitis. It's worth a conversation with the barn about their treat policy - generally it seems to me that many barns don't want people feeding horses for liability reasons. People can get bitten, and ignorant people can feed horses things that are dangerous to them. But if he'll be in a paddock next to a road, for example, then it might not be so easy to control - the barn should know whether it's a common problem or not, though. Overall I would say I have not had a huge issue with people randomly feeding my horse but I have generally boarded at smaller MYOB type places.

It sounds like the seller is being very honest and that goes a long way. No reasonable seller will be offended by a request for a vet check and as others pointed out, she sounds responsible and caring and is probably happy that he would be going to someone with enough knowledge and concern for his well-being to take good care of him.
 

Capriole

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Thank you so much everyone, I really appreciate you taking the time to answer 💖
I am probably overreacting a bit...as it's been pointed out just because a horse may be prone to developing metabolic issues doesn't necessarily mean they will....and even a horse that isn't particularly prone can still develop issues if allowed to get too overweight.
I believe he's healthy now...but, I'll have him checked...
 

Capriole

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Well...couldn't find a vet that was able to do a prepurchase exam before the 25th (when he'd be delivered) and then she was contacted again by someone from out of state who was interested in him...so I had to make a decision...since the lady would need to make travel plans to come see him....soooo...he'll be delivered on the 25th. 😁
After calming down and thinking about it I'm not so worried....she also said she would take him back if it didn't work out for any reason.
 

Capriole

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Thank you!!

Yes, she is ....she has repeatedly said she wants everyone to be happy :)

To clarify on the boarding...I will be keeping him at my brother and sister in law's house. I work for their company, so I'm there at least five days a week.
The problem before was that all the guys that work for them would give my sister in law's horse treats as they came and went, which contributed to his weight gain/IR. They have all been told NOT to feed the horses....as far as I know everyone is complying...but....I'm not out there all the time....

Oh...there will be pics :D!
 

Taz

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He's lovely, congratulations. Give him time and hang out with him in his paddock not asking anything of him but just to let you be with him and he'll relax.
 

Capriole

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Thank you both so much!!
Yeah, right now I'm just letting him get used to me and things around here. Luckily he and Farah (the Arabian mare) are getting along great (even though I think they might be a bad influence on each other sometimes 😆 )
 

Capriole

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Congratulations, that is a handsome pony. Do see a wee bit of hackney in there somewhere? I bet he moves nice. I really like him!
Thank you! Hackney? Do you think? I have no idea.... He came from a rescue, so they didn't really know much about him either. He does have a pretty fancy trot ....I thought so anyway... when he was trotting away from me to avoid being caught 😄... He's getting better though....
 
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