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AngieA

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4 year old gelding ..never had hoof problems until we moved to the Tundra...have had 3 blacksmiths...in 3 years up here. What is happening is he is growing hoof that look like cans...I keep saying take down the heel and let the toe grow out...they won't do it.... he is going to have such problems with his legs as he is so upright on his hoofs....he is done every 6 to 8 weeks but I can't get this fixed. If you can tell me exactly what to do I will tell them ...show them...if it doesn't help I will do it...He is to nice a boy to be screwed up by these guys...Please any info will be appreciated.

Thanks
 
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lyn_j

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[SIZE=14pt]Take off heel and no toe for a few trims. You get a rasp and in between rasp the hooves back to front lowering the heels even more. He will make you a club footed horse if you arent careful. Thats why we do our own feet now.[/SIZE]

Lyn
 

Margaret

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Also if he has a buildup of dead, dry frog inside, it will be difficult for an inexperienced farrier to take off the necessary heel, to correct him.. I have seen some cases that require the dead frog to be first trimmed down to get that heel to be accessed for trimming. You will know by looking at how far down the frog extends at the back of the hoof.
 

attwoode

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Angie,

We've had the same problem with our farrier. The farrier we were using kept the hooves at too steep of an angle. I started directing him to lower the heel and eventually just do it myself now. the easiest thing for me is to stand the horse up and look at the natural angle of shoulder and pastern. Then I trim the hoof to match. Once you get it right you can remember the angle that works best for each horse. If your farrier has a gauge to measure the angle, I find on mine that that the front hoof angle is usally around 50 degrees and the rear between 52- 55 degrees. It has made a huge difference in their hooves to have the correct angle!
 

AngieA

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I have a mini rasp...and will start working on him after Thursday....thats when the farrier will be here again...I have never had such a time with feet in many years of horses...makes me crazy...If we didn't have such snowy winters I swear I would just load them up go back to where we came from and find my old farrier!

Thank you for your reply's.....if anyone else can help also I will take all suggestions!
 

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