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Azure

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Hello all!

I'm new to the forum. I just discovered it a few days ago while snooping around online, and it was just too good to pass up. Anyways, ya'all seem like a very helpful bunch, so I figured it wouldn't hurt to see if anyone can answer a few questions for me! I'm a long-time mini owner, I've owned my two geldings for about 11 years now. So I'm a fairly experienced mini-er. However, I recently received a job offer and will be moving from Florida to Virginia in about a month. I'm desperate to bring at least one of my little guys with me. I just purchased a trailer for him, but I've never trailered long distance. Is there anything important I should know/do/have on hand? How often should I stop for a break? How many hours should a horse be trailered per day? Are leg wraps necessary? Any other tips? I just want to make sure he's as comfy and safe as possible!

Also, if it's not too much trouble....does anyone know of a good place to board a mini in the north virginia/washington d.c. area? (I'll be working in the Mclean/Langley area) I'm having a difficult time finding a horse boarding place that will take him. Most "big horse" people don't have accomodations for a mini or don't want to take the risk. I found a place, but it's $525 a month! I'm desperate! Help!

Thanks for your time and consideration!
 

Nathan Luszcz

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"Is there anything important I should know/do/have on hand?"

Normal anti-colic drugs are always nice to have, but aren't terribly nessesary. Bring water from his current barn (in 5 gal gas jugs, or the like... just make sure they are used only for water!). Make sure the water is the same as what he's used to, it'll taste different. Bring extra hay, grain, etc.

"How often should I stop for a break?"

Every few hours is fine, basically as often as you have to stop for gas/bathroom breaks.

"How many hours should a horse be trailered per day?"

As long as needed... I try to stay under 12-16 hours per day. If I have to go more than 16 hours I rather break it into two days.

"Are leg wraps necessary?"

Is he used to them? If he is, then yes, they are better. If he is not, its better not to have anything on him.

"Any other tips?"

Best money you'll ever spend is US Riders... its a motor club for equestrians. TOP NOTCH service and VERY well worth the money for anyone who does any real trailering of horses or farm stuff. Bring a spare tire for the trailer, AND LUG WRENCHES for it as well. Make sure your truck's jack will fit under and lift the trailer, or bring a jack/ramp specifically for the trailer. That trip isn't terribly long, so I wouldn't worry too much. Should be able to do it in a day. Traffic from FL to VA is heavier than in other places, so it won't be as fast as it would in the western states.

Bring maps and GPS if you have it.. you won't regret it!
 

HGFarm

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We have moved a few times, a couple of them pretty long distance with full sized horses. Also back and forth to Nationals is a long 2 day trip for us.

We make sure the trailer is bedded well with shavings (not if it's an open stock trailer though- they will blow all over- you will have to use something else) that are fairly deep. We stop about every four hours or so depending on what we are hauling. Any time we stop to eat, the horses are unloaded (in a SAFE area) and walked or longed and just sort of wander around with them to get the kinks out and move around. We also keep a bucket of water in front of them at all times, but only fill it about half way so it doesnt slosh all over. Make sure they can reach it when it gets low... Some horses new to hauling just dont like drinking on the road period. We always take several jugs of their own water from home, so it is familiar to them. Water from other places DOES smell and taste different.

Yep, as Nathan said, anything that may help in case of colic or some emergency...

Before moving, you may want to take them for a couple of short rides to get them used to the whole trailer thing, and loading and unloading...

We tie the horses in also, but not real short, they can reach their water (the buckets are elevated some) but cannot get tangled in the lead ropes- but it enough to allow them to get their heads down some and not get stiff necks, etc...

Hope this helps- I'm sure you'll get more good info here too..
 

Nathan Luszcz

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I use an open stock trailer with shavings (as in, its a stock trailer with the window slats removed) and they don't blow around unless you use the really light and fluffy ones. If you do travel in a trailer with any significant openings (stock trailers for sure) make sure your horse is wearing a fly mask.

I do not tie my horses in the stock trailer... with the slant load I do.

I NEVER, EVER, EVER unload a horse except at a barn unless its an emergency. Just don't do it! Its not safe. They are fine and comfortable on the trailer, and MUCH safer.
 
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AnnaC

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Good advice given here already. Can I just add from my own experience?

Nearly 2 years ago now I moved together with family, domestic animals and some 42 minis, approx 230 miles across the UK - not a long distance by your standards over there, but a major stress related happening for me!

Our lorry has 6 mini compartments each measuring 4' x 3'3", but one compartment is actually the 'grooms door' place with access from the outside. All compartments have paritions/doors completely to the floor, so no danger of little feet slipping underneath, should someone fall, of even lay down to sleep (which two of them did!). Grid work is in place so all can see each other without actual contact. Everything was extremely well bedded up (straw) - remember that on a long trip the bedding will get trampled/moved around if there is not enough of it. On one trip with the 'tinies' of the herd, we did travel 6 by putting a board across the grooms door, just incase the door flew open en route - it was obviously locked, but wanted to be extra safe. We still had access to the horses from our living compartment, which again opens normally into the 'grooms' area, but then had to perform clever climbing tactics over partitions and horses to get everyone watered etc!

Mostly we travelled 5 minis or 4 when a 'larger' one required 2 compartments. All travelled loose and all found their most comfortable positions in their individual compartments.

We stopped every 3 hours for 1 hour, to give unaccustomed muscles (theirs and ours!) a chance for a break. Also this was when we offered water - most drunk a few mouthfuls - and also a handful or so of wet hay - this was on the advice of vet and friends who said that horses dont digest food well when travelling, but on a journey of 10 to 11 hours it was essential to get a little something going through their systems, preferably wet in case they refused to drink.

We did not unload any of them - too many to cope with between just two of us - but found that the 1 hour break was much appreciated by both the oldies and the foals (who laid down for a snooze). The wet hay given when we stopped was put on the floor for them to eat - this helped keep their sinuses drained - can be a problem with long distance if a horse is tied up.

We were warned about possible colic through stress or lack of 'food'. But I think the small feeds of hay helped and inspite of the fact that at least half the horses had never travelled before, all loaded and travelled with no problem, and all arrived safely with no signs of stress or colic. On arrival each 'load' was turned loose in a large strawed barn and left for a couple of hours to have a roll, a rest, a drink and a munch on more wet hay. They were then turned loose into the field to await the arrival of the next batch of their friends some 24 hours later. The colts and stallions didnt get this luxury! On arrival they were walked around to stretch their legs, then put straight into their stables with a very small feed of their normal food and some wet hay, but I think that stallions particularly stay a lot fitter and are more up to 'coping' with things than are young fillies and pregnant mares.

None of the horses wore leg wraps or bandages - not used to it - but we did make sure we had a good supply of first aid bits and pieces on board!

So - after all my waffle above - I think a few things are important ......

Comfort of the horse - bedding, decent breaks in the journey, water and feed, time to get their heads down, first aid equipment, if not unloaded then the possibility to be given more space to have a move round during the breaks - move the partition over? But above all A CAREFUL, CONSIDERATE AND EXPERIENCED DRIVER!!

Good luck with your move!

Anna
 

Bess Kelly

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Hi there....I'm in VA.

Franklin, about 50 miles SWof Va Beach area. Have hauled from here into/out of FL on several occassions. It's been 11-14 hr trips, depending upon where in FL. But not had any problems with the animals. Listen to all the travel tips but, with a well balanced trailer they do just fine for a one day trip wit this distance. I allow about two stops of an hr each for self and them to stretch and relax. Of course I check when I stop for gas, etc. So, they get a couple shorter stops. This time of year if you can travel at night it's cooler for them....also less traffic, in general.

The area you are talking is the high end for price. Have you a house/apartment, etc. selected? If so I may be able to help you with areas to search which are on the "skirts" of the locations you mention. I'll look at a map and see if anyone is in the general area. May be able to help you find a temp place until you can get here, settled and look closer.
 

bevann

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Hello all!
I'm new to the forum. I just discovered it a few days ago while snooping around online, and it was just too good to pass up. Anyways, ya'all seem like a very helpful bunch, so I figured it wouldn't hurt to see if anyone can answer a few questions for me! I'm a long-time mini owner, I've owned my two geldings for about 11 years now. So I'm a fairly experienced mini-er. However, I recently received a job offer and will be moving from Florida to Virginia in about a month. I'm desperate to bring at least one of my little guys with me. I just purchased a trailer for him, but I've never trailered long distance. Is there anything important I should know/do/have on hand? How often should I stop for a break? How many hours should a horse be trailered per day? Are leg wraps necessary? Any other tips? I just want to make sure he's as comfy and safe as possible!

Also, if it's not too much trouble....does anyone know of a good place to board a mini in the north virginia/washington d.c. area? (I'll be working in the Mclean/Langley area) I'm having a difficult time finding a horse boarding place that will take him. Most "big horse" people don't have accomodations for a mini or don't want to take the risk. I found a place, but it's $525 a month! I'm desperate! Help!

Thanks for your time and consideration!

I am in DELAWARE about 2 hours east of DC&would be glad to board both horses for you until you find something.I also have a friend in Nokesville, VA who has combined driving Minis.She might be able to help you locate a place close to DC.Nokesville is horse country, but not sure about rates for boarding.We have 3 AMHR shows every year in Harrington,DE about 2 hrs east of DC.Welcome to the area.
 

Bess Kelly

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Since you have this much notice, you should check with vet rquirements for transport, as a current coggins and travel certificate witll be the least needs.......some states require certain vaccines and you may want to inquire as to things in the area you will be moving to that are not native to FL. Potomac Fever comes to mind first but, State vets can advise of others. Possibly any high exposures to "something going around" in the area, etc.

You have time for vaccine and immunity build up if you get on that now -- in case you haven't already. It gets busy when you're packing, moving and transporting animals, too.
 

PrestigeMiniHorses

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Being that we are a Army family I travel ALOT with my horses and usually over 1000 miles at a time in between moves it seems. I think most people have covered the basics for you but I must stress call the Department of Agriculture in advance to find out what requirements you have to have to bring horses in. Most states only want current health papers and a negative coggins but you never know. I know sometimes they require special tests be done... Bring water from home, I usually bring a tube of electolyte paste too just in case. Plenty of first aid supplies. Bed the trailer well... I usually use straw.. Shavings are too messy to me... But if you do use them in the trailer put a fly mask on your kiddo(s).. I usually offer water at every rest area and sometimes at all gas stops too.... At night I always leave my horses in the trailer overnight with plenty of hay... And we refuse to get a hotel that doesn't have a grassy area nearby... I usually let them out to stretch out then groom them and blanket if necessary and then put them in with water and all that good stuff.... And I usually alert the hotel staff that they are there and leave our info at the office in case of a emergency. Always has worked great for us...
 

Azure

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Bevann: Thank you, I appreciate the generosity.Though that's a bit far for me to board. (I <3 my boy and want him close to me!) I've found a temporary place to board him, but it's outrageously expensive. Nokesville wouldn't be too bad, I mapped it and it looks as if it'll be within an hours drive from where I'd be working. If I live in that area, it'll be even nearer. The AMHR shows are definitely something I'll have to look into though. I stopped showing a few years ago because of college, but now that I'm all growed up and graduated I'd love to get back into it.

Bess Kelly: I've been looking at apartments in the Herndon/Reston VA area. However, I'm signing a short lease to leave myself open to options in case something better comes up for Renegade (my mini). Leaving my housing situation up in the air for a 34 inch tall equine, hehehe. My friends all think I'm CRAZY.

Everyone else: Wow, thanks everyone! VERY helpful advice! (in fact, I just printed the whole thread and went to town on the printout with a hilighter, hehe.) Tons of stuff that I would never have thought of.
 

Azure

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P.S.-regarding shots/vaccinations, I've just had his coggins updated, and also he just got his EWT/Rhino & Flu and West Nile shots. Is there anything additional a horse should have for farther north? Whooo, I'm a little nervous about all these moving technicalities. Renegade and I have never even seen SNOW!!
 

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