HELP: Newborn has tucked rear legs and unable to walk.

Discussion in 'Miniature Horse Pregnancy, Foaling and Mare Stare' started by CSquared2, Aug 31, 2018.

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  1. Aug 31, 2018 #1

    CSquared2

    CSquared2

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    We just had our first baby this AM. She was probably an hour or two old when I found her. She is now probably 7-8 hours old. She can stand, but her rear legs are tucked under her and she is unable to nurse without assistance. She will attempt to nurse and then fall down before she can latch. I’ve been assisting her and she’s made multiple bowel movements and urinated. 

    She basically lays down and sleeps unless she is up to nurse. Most of my equine friends think it will resolve over a few days but I cannot find much info about this anywhere. I’m assuming it is contracted tendons? I’ve worked on gently stretching her legs when she’s laying down. I’ve included a photo for reference. Any help is much appreciated! 
     
  2. Aug 31, 2018 #2

    CSquared2

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  3. Aug 31, 2018 #3

    chandab

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    I know people get tired of hearing it, but I'd get a vet involved for this.   Get  your vet's opinion on her legs, and get an IGG done to be sure she got enough colostrum, since she has mobility issues and a hard time getting to the udder to nurse.
     
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  4. Aug 31, 2018 #4

    CSquared2

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    Unfortunely it isn’t that easy.  She is my MIL’s who purchased her for my daughter and bred her. She lives with us but I am not in a financial situation to have a vet come out, we are very rural. She is very experienced with horses and has asked around and everyone has told her it would be fine. My concern is greater as I am the one having to essentially keep her alive at this point and am looking for a little more guidance. 
     
  5. Aug 31, 2018 #5

    Mona

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    That's a TALL newborn.  Wondering if maybe it has something to do with being so cramped up inside, she maybe didn't grow properly??
     
  6. Aug 31, 2018 #6

    Mona

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    I guess if you cannot afford a vet, the only thing you can really do then at this point, is to continue helping the foal nurse and to ensure she's getting enough to eat. Maybe once she starts moving around more and is up on her feet more, she'll slowly unfold.
     
  7. Aug 31, 2018 #7

    CSquared2

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    Yup, I had some rancher friends stop by and they said the same thing. We estimated she was due June/July so she is possibly a month over due. I’ll be up with her every hour tonight and they said she should loosen up within a few days as long as I can keep her nursing and alive. 
     
  8. Aug 31, 2018 #8

    Mona

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    What was she bred to??  A big pony stud?
     
  9. Sep 1, 2018 #9

    Reignmaker Miniatures

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    The first thing I wondered is the selenium status of your soil. Here we have low selenium and must supplement our animals to avoid the problems that can arise from not having enough. If it were me (please understand that I am not a vet nor any kind of expert) I would consider trying a shot of A,D and E with selenium if you can access it if low selenium is an issue there. Otherwise a wait and see and the stretching you are trying might be your only option. I hope the locals are right and she improves soon. Is there any way you can phone a vet and ask for their advice?  If you explain the financial limitations and the situation they might at least offer an educated guess or two. Good luck.
     
  10. Sep 1, 2018 #10

    CSquared2

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    My MIL has the stud and he’s the same height give or take an inch as the mare and smaller bodied. 
     
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  11. Sep 2, 2018 #11

    madmax

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    There is a therapy called  'patterning' used for children but also used for animals.  It will most likely take 2 people to implement it.   The foal should be standing, one person to steady it on one side and the other person on the other side, taking turns moving the legs one by one in a natural gait. It 'teaches' the body hopefully instilling muscle memory. Once is not enough, must be repeated.  Just a suggestion, I had a dummy foal that we used on it with success.   I am not a vet, but raised many foals and can agree that if cramped in the womb it is possible there is a chance with time and massage all will be well.  I wish you well.
     
  12. Sep 2, 2018 #12

    CSquared2

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    Turns out she has luxated patellas. Surgery is the only option. Still thriving with my assistance nursing every hour. I’m half dead, but she’s worth it. 

    My MIL won’t cover the cost of surgery so I will be working on finding a vet school willing to do the surgery. 
     
  13. Sep 2, 2018 #13

    chandab

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    Interesting. 

    I had a foal several years ago, with a similar stance, but he passed within 24 hours, so didn't have a chance to see a vet.  I think mine came a bit early.
     
  14. Sep 9, 2018 #14

    Magic Marker Miniatures

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    I think your foal has contracted tendons, not the other think.

    We have had two foals born with the same problem. One passed away 24 hours after due to difficult delivery. The second one recovered and is completely normal.

    The foal is big and probably didn't have enough room in the dam.

    The foal will straighten out with time. May take a couple weeks.
     
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  15. Sep 9, 2018 #15

    Mona

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    How do you know the foal has luxating patellas? Perhaps in a newborn, they are luxating for a specific reason. Due to positioning inside of dam, lack of space etc.  Is she straightening out at al yet??  Can you post new pics and possibly short video clip?
     
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