HAVE LEARNED MY LESSON ABOUT AUCTIONS!

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GAILS

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BOUGHT A FILLY AT AN AUCTION. ORIGINAL CERT HAD BEEN LOST BUT HAD A COPY AND SIGNED TRANSFER PAPERS AND SIGNED AFFIDAVIT ON LOST ORIG. SENT IN ALL PAPER WORK AND GET LETTER BACK FROM AMHA SAYING NEED OWNER TO SIGN TRANSFER PAPERS. CALLED THE PERSON THEY SAID OWNED THE FILLY. FOUND OUT THAT THE CERT COPY I HAVE DOES NOT EVEN BELONG TO THE FILLY I BOUGHT.(SENT HER PICTURES). PEOPLE THAT HAD THE CONSIGNMENT SALE SAID THOSE WERE THE PAPERS THE SELLER SENT. WELL WHEN I TALKED TO THE SELLER SHE SAID, " I DON'T WHAT YOU WANT ME TO DO. I SENT THE RIGHT PAPERS." THIS DOESN"T MAKE SENSE BECAUSE SHE DOESN"T EVEN OWN THE HORSE SHE SENT THE COPIES OF CERT ON. SHE SAYS "GUESS YOU JUST NEED TO DO DNA TESTING. "LIKE I SAY, HAVE LEARNED MY LESSON, BUT WHAT SHOULD I DO NOW? THANKS
 

Miniv

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I'm confused......


It sounds like the person who put the filly through the auction never put her name on the the filly's papers, right? And then the papers were lost. Right?

So, the person who is listed as the owner needs to sign the transfer form AND the lost paperwork form, right?

Or are you saying the lost registration papers don't even belong to the filly your bought in the first place?!
 

HGFarm

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I have not been to any auctions here lately- usually avoid them like the plague... however, we have a state livestock board, who have inspectors to review paperwork. I watched them climbing all over some guy one time who had brought in horses from the reservation to sell, and apparently the paperwork didnt match the horse.

Was there an office at the auction? Do the papers have a photo on them at all, or description of the horse? Does it match the color and age of the horse that went through the auction, including markings? Does the auction have any signs hanging or papers given out as to who is responsible to check all this out before leaving the premises?

DNA is not going to tell you anything if you dont know who the parents are, or where the horse really came from. Does the first owner even recognize the horse as one of theirs? Where did the seller get the papers that were presented at the auction?
 

Suzie

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I don't have an answer for you but auctions I have attended usually have a statement to the fact that any problems with the horse are strictly between seller and buyer- the auctioneer or auction personnel do not guarantee anything other than "what you see is what you get".

This may be a case of chalk this up to a learning experience. If you were told during the bidding that the papers were a copy, etc. you may have no recourse. If not, perhaps you could get the auctioneer to help you. But your window of opportunity may have closed. If I buy at an auction, I go right then and pay to look at the paperwork. If it is not up to snuff, I can go right back then and challenge the auctioneer and either resell the animal or refuse to pay. But once you leave the grounds and time elapses, not sure you can do that. I hope you do get it worked out. Good luck.
 

sdmini

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To get this straight you believe you were sold a horse with the wrong set of papers according to the previous owner correct? The people that sold the horse did not tranfer the horse into their name and it sounds like they might have bought the horse from someone other than the listed seller as well, meaning she skipped several tranfers.

Are the listed owners 100% sure it is a different horse?

Call the auction house, granted they often do not want to step in the middle of registration issues but at the very least apprise them of the situation. IF the seller sold the horse as registered in the ring the auction house may be able to lean on them to either provide appropriate papers or take the horse back. Remember to be polite, brief, thank them for their time and BE CLEAR.

"I bought lot #X at the sale on __date, the seller, X, sold a horse said to be ___registered. The paperwork they provided me was not only missing a tranfer from the recorded owner but according to the listed owner is not even the correct horse apon inspection of the photos I provided them."

All said and done you may have to chalk this one up to a learning experience.
 

Keri

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I've never been to an auction, but not all are bad. You've just managed to find the one person who decided to jip you. :DOH! Take the suggestions from the other people and try them. If not, sell her as an unregistered mare and find something you want.
 
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