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novachick

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Hi everyone! Hoping you can give me some opinions...

In preparation for getting Goldilocks a buddy sometime this summer, I was beginning to think about fencing options for seperation during the introduction time. We have an area just outside the stalls fenced with woven wire fencing but I'd like to put up another area away from that area to use to quarenteen. I can't put up another permanent area (with concreted posts) because it will either be close to our creek or over our septic system drainage area, so I was thinking about electric. This won't be the regular area they will in once they are introduced, but I'm thinking it might be a good thing to keep up to rotate them onto to graze and also do some individual training work.

Here's the many questions in my mind...

What electric fence systems work well? Do the solar systems work at all? Can I trust the distances they say they are good for? Do you prefer the wire or tape types?

Any other things you can think of that I should consider...please share!

Thanks - Jen
 

wcr

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Before I had electricity around the place I used the solar fencer and wasn't real happy with them. They weren't as strong as electric and in the winter would loose energy. I now use pretty strong fencers with the wide tape which looks pretty nice and is stronger to keep them in. They come in contact with the tape before they go through it and get zapped. My herd is respectful of the tape but I have a couple that are always testing to see if it is on and will get out if they have a chance. My opinion on fencers is the stronger the better.
 

Minimor

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I've got a 5 acre pasture to fence this year so have been looking at electric fencing. I am told that tape tends to blow in the wind too much, and also stretches too much; some stores will point out their cheapest cord & tell me that will work just fine. My feed store guy--whom I trust to tell me the truth--tells me that the cheapest variety of cord is not a good choice for my 5 acres. It would be okay if I were just fencing off my back yard, but for a larger area its impedence is too high & it will not give satisfactory results...too little current which probably equals some loose horses. Not what I want!

So, I am going with the higher end cord--either electrobraid or a slightly cheaper equivalent that I can buy locally. I want the cord because it's visible--for sure that's what I will use for my top strand. Depending on finances I might use just plain silver wire for my bottom strand--it's $30/1320' compared to $155/1320' for the cord (or $189/1320' for electrobraid). The plain wire works well, except for the fact that it's hard for the horses to see and sometimes they run through it if it isn't well flagged the first few times they are out in it. (That's what we've always used for our Morgans). This time around I want the visible cord so that I don't need to mess with flagging the wire)

I have an old electric fencer--I forget the brand--it works well but is ancient & I don't know how it will work with the cord. I may soon be buying a new one. I've considered the solar ones but I know some people that have had a lot of problems with them. I will probably buy another ordinary plug in one, just because they do work well unless there is a power outage--and our power outages tend to be quite rare. I don't know if the fencers are all good for the range they say they are; when I buy another one I'll get one that is supposed to be good for more fence than what I have--say 3 or 5 miles for my 1 miles of fence--but I don't imagine that I need one that is rated for 15 or 20 miles when all I have is 1 mile!

Do get the lightning protectors too--or be prepared to turn off the fencer every time there is a lightning storm. Electric fences attract lightning; years ago ours was struck, and it burned out the fencer. (Piddly little cloud with one bolt of lightnng in it, and it had to get our fencer!) Since then we just turn the fencer off if it's looking like there's a storm coming up--the Morgans were good with the fences & more often than not the power was shut off anyway. This time around I plan to put the lightning things on the fence.

Be cautious about working a horse too much on top of your septic field--a horse tramping around on it isn't good for it! We do graze our septic field area, but I don't work horses on it.
 

K&H Miniatures

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I have recently put up an electric fence. It is only about 1 acre if that to turn my mares out on during the day until we can get more permanent fencing. I used the electric polytape. It is 1/2" We put three rows and they have been on it for 2 weeks without any problems. Yes it blows in the wind, but they touch it run away for a bit. I have not had any loose horses yet. Just make sure that if you use this type to have a great perimeter fence. We do even though it is on about 150 acres. They still will not get out on the road just maybe in with my dad's cows. Also, check it for electricity all the time. A fence checker will let you know if it is really hot or not. I bought mine at a place called J & I in Madill, Oklahoma for $28 for 1320' It was the cheapest I found.
 

Bess Kelly

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I have two of the larger solars and they work very well -- I've been tested
:DOH! They register as high on the fence tester as my plugged in one.

Of course, if you are in an area that has a lot of overcast/cloud, etc. they will not work well for you. They have been used for 10 acres very nicely, with strong current. I like plain old wire for this and usually do 3 strands. It is VERY important that you test frequently to assure it is on -- no breaks in wire, etc. The batteries need to be replaced occassionally. I find mine do about 2 yrs really well then need replacing. At about $25-28 a piece it works out to just over $1 per month. Can't complain about that.

The animals must be trained to it. If they ever decide they can charge the fence and get out, they will do so from then on.....unless it's a one time scare thing.....so, I put them in and "encourage" them to hit it! Pop a wet nose on one strand and woooweee, they run. A good way is to wet the grass around the perimeter and let them get into that wet grass, then encourage them to hit it. Sounds bad, right?
Well, I've had the experience a few times and I'm still here! PLUS I know better than to hit it -- so this training will do wonders for them and keep all safely in place.

I flag the wire with the bright plastic marker tape. Yeah , it's a little tacky but sure works. Also, I keep a 4-6' strip mowed all around the inside perimeter, to alert them to the fence "Being there".....and keep weeds off the wire. They like to eat in the shorter area, so soon that is kept lower by them and you only have to remow on occassion.

Another thing that keeps the power from being amped up is your grounding. Keep the ground wire in good contact to the rod and make sure the copper rod deep into the ground. The rod must be in moist soil. So if you are in a very dry climate, wet that ground!! You may need to use two rods. Dump your water tubs there, run your hose, etc. It will make a huge difference. Another reason for a deep rod, the ground is moister the further down you go.

Most animals do very well. Some don't
 

ChrystalPaths

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I have over 30 acres electric fenced and it hurts if ya touch it. I have one old stallion who recently feels 3 and is only kept from my mares by a 3 strand. They share a split shed and never ever have I had trouble with this boy. Now Glow...if a mare was in heat wire be dam@ed..he'd sail thru pain or no right Suzie? Depends on the horses. 2 of mine were never introduced to wire before coming here but learned quick. I can move it make it bigger put in a divide...I love the electric ones myself. When there's new foal I add the orange snow fencing for a while til the know the perimeter then remove it.
 

Windhaven

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I also have electric. I have had 3 strands of 1 1/2" tape for years. I do know if you don't want the wind to stretch it you are suppose to put a couple of twists in the tape between each post. I have done this and it works great. I also have it hung straight and it also works great, but I will have to tighten it though. I love my electric tape. Easy for my foals to see and learn what it is all about. I do how every put woven wire around my stallion pens with electric tape and the pens I plan on putting weanlings at the time of weaning.

I have only used electric fencers also. I also recommend a stronger fencer. We have a weed burner for a fencer.

If you are only planning on using it as a temperary fencing I would go with electric tape. You can also buy step in post with the insulators already on them which also work great. I would just use T-post for the corners and where the gate is.
 

dangerranger

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I agree that the cheepest cord should be avoided except in very temperary situations. the wires in the cord break at the points where they hang from the posts. I have a couple of temp pastures and have to test them every day. by using them on temp posts I move it often enough that it doesnt break down very quickly. Ive gotten about three years out of this last roll. DR.
 
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