Quantcast

EHV-1 | Strangles

Miniature Horse Talk Forums

Help Support Miniature Horse Talk Forums:

Debby - LB

Admin / Mod
Joined
Aug 18, 2003
Messages
2,337
Reaction score
781
Location
Georgia
Do to the continuing outbreak of EHV-1 and the Strangles outbreak in Canada we at Lil Beginnings would like to remind you to be ready to use comprehensive bio-security measures and have a plan to deal with these diseases.

Horse owners and caretakers, industry participants and especially Equine Event Managers for shows and competitions are urged to use and enforce biosecurity practices, particularly if competing/traveling or organizing events.

From the AAEP - pertinent Q&A. -PLEASE click through to read.
While there are several vaccines available for protection against both respiratory disease and abortion as a result of EHV-1 infection, at this time there is no equine licensed vaccine that has a label claim for protection against the neurological strain of the virus (EHM).​
• EHV-1: Can cause four manifestations of disease in horses, including neurological form, respiratory disease, abortion and neonatal death.

EHV-1 is contagious and spread by direct horse-to-horse contact via the respiratory tract through nasal secretions. It is important to know that this disease can also be spread indirectly through contact with physical objects contaminated with the virus:

• Human contaminated hands or clothing
• Contaminated equipment and tack
• Contaminated trailers used for transporting horses
• Contaminated wipe rags or other grooming equipment
• Contaminated feed and water buckets

The air around the horse that is shedding the virus can also be contaminated with infectious virus. Although it is known that the virus can be airborne, it is difficult to establish the distance the virus can spread in this manner under typical horse management and environmental conditions.
What are some of the signs of EHV?
After infection, incubation period may be as short as 24 hours, but is typically 4-6 days, but can be longer. EHV-1 typically causes a biphasic (two-phase) fever peaking on day 1 or 2 and again on day 6 or 7. With respiratory infections there is often serous or mucoid nasal and ocular discharge, but not a lot of coughing. There may be some persistent enlargement of submandibular lymph nodes (lymph nodes under the jaw). With the neurologic form there are typically minimal respiratory signs, with fever (rectal temperature greater than 102 degrees F) being the only warning sign. Neurologic disease appears suddenly and is usually rapidly progressing, reaching its peak intensity within 24 to 48 hours from onset of neurologic signs. Clinical signs of the neurologic disease may include:

• Nasal discharge
• Incoordination
• Hind limb weakness
• Loss of tail tone
• Lethargy
• Urine dribbling
• Head tilt
• Leaning against a fence or wall to maintain balance
• Inability to rise
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~​
Biosecurity update: Strangles in Ontario
May 14th 2015

The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) continues to receive reports of cases of equine Strangles (S. equi sp. equi infection) circulating in Waterloo Region, Wellington and Middlesex Counties as well as other regions in Ontario. Strangles is not a reportable disease in the province of Ontario; however, it is highly contagious to horses and other equids, and outbreaks are a concern to the equine industry. Horse owners and caretakers, industry participants and especially Equine Event Managers for shows and competitions are urged to use and enforce biosecurity practices, particularly if competing/travelling or organizing events....
....Please continue reading by clicking here.

Please do everything you can to reduce the chances of an infectious disease being carried onto your farm by people, animals, equipment or vehicles either accidentally or on purpose. Anything that touches an infected horse or sheds secretions from sick horses has the potential to transfer pathogens to other horses. You are the best protection your horses have.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Miniv

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
12,747
Reaction score
677
Excellent post......Thank you.

My personal suggestion would be to close your herd for now......which is a hard decision to make for people showing or doing outside breeding, plus selling.

This will hit horse owners/breeders, transporters, shows, hard financially.....but hopefully everyone will look at the big picture and see that their animal's

well being is more important.
 

MiniNHF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2012
Messages
625
Reaction score
189
Location
Delaware
There is now a barn I believe in PA that has been hit with it, and they believe it came from a paper chase that was just held and they are trying to track down every one who was there to have their horses tested.
 

Debby - LB

Admin / Mod
Joined
Aug 18, 2003
Messages
2,337
Reaction score
781
Location
Georgia
That's a shame. When they track them down they will have already spread it to many more.

I feel bad for the people who are faced with this and the decisions about traveling they will have to make.

It's easy for me to sit back and say that the best and really only thing to do is like Maryanne said "close your herd now". I know there are people who have planned since last year to frequent certain shows, already paid their entry fees plus worked their vacations and time off around the show dates.. Lost time and money for clubs and show personnel is also a consideration plus all the trickle down. I'm also hearing of more Vesicular Stomatitis reports, the latest in Texas, which could potentially restrict travel if that gets worse.

I really do recommend all reading to close your herd. And put off your travel plans, be careful who you let on your property. Do what you can to reduce spreading these diseases.
 

Minimor

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2004
Messages
8,588
Reaction score
860
Location
Brandon Manitoba
I am actually surprised to see any big deal being made over a strangles outbreak. Those seem so common place here--and it isn't a reportable disease here. We used to hear of a barn or two with an outbreak every year. Now I'm a little out of the local horse scene loop so haven't heard of anything much the last couple years. It is just second nature here to be careful of anything contagious. Frankly if everyone stayed home and shows shut down because of strangles--many spring/summers there would be no horse events. I can honestly say we have never picked anything up at a show, even those times when there were sick horses being shown at events we were at. We have had sick horses 3 different times since 1991 (prior to that we never had anything in our herd) but none of it came from shows.

Now the EHV is more worrisome--because of the neurological variety becoming so prevalent. It's been around for years but prior to 2012 it was quite rare and if we did hear of a case it was far away and did not affect anyone anywhere near --and was not likely to be brought to an event we attend. Rhino was rhino and abortion was the most worrisome aspect of the virus.
 

Ryan Johnson

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2014
Messages
3,104
Reaction score
1,509
Location
Melbourne Australia
Back in August 2007 we had a massive out break of Equine influenza in Australia. Over 76000 horses were infected with the virus. ALL interstate travel was shut down and during the worst , horses were not allowed to leave properties at all.

Horse Racing , Pony clubs, shows, ODE all cancelled until the following year. There were police on every border to ensure no horses crossed states.
 

Jean_B

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2002
Messages
1,535
Reaction score
384
Location
Amery, Wisconsin
I'm not at all concerned about strangles. Yes, it is nasty. Picked it up from a horse that was stalled at a show, which had previously housed a large horse consignment sale....even though I had sprayed the stall down first. It ran through the herd, but everyone was now immune for quite a few years. The down side, had to stay home from all shows the rest of the season.

But this EHV-1 is something else...and cause for major concern. I'm keeping my horses home, sanitizing after visiting any farms that show so that I don't drag anything home, and will assess whether or not I want to chance taking anything to nationals (weanlings only which don't require qualifying) as time gets closer.
 

Latest posts

Top