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Can anyone help me with this little bucker?

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Maxi'sMinis

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I think I am going to start weaning my little sassy lassy. She is almost 4 months and solid as a rock. Yeah she's confident. She is already second ranked mare out of 6. Her Mommy is the boss. She bucks when you touch her rump, kicks when you touch her hind legs. I have never encouraged her to do this and have done a fair amount of socializing with her. She has always been very independent. She is halter broke and leads well. I have been desensitizing her but I just wanted to get some of your opinions on your methods for training and discouraging this behavior. I want to be sure not to make it worse. Do you think the other mares will be rough on her when I take her Mom out since she is a little fart to them? She kicks at them at the feeder even when she is not eating. She just likes to push her little weight around like she's all that. I would really value your input. I want to get her to a couple shows soon and don't want her to do this in the ring when I need to set her up or touch her. I patted her on the rump in my avatar and that was the 1st time she bucked up like that. Heeelp.

 
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MiLo Minis

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I would wean her but I would take her out of the field and leave mom in with the mares. Mom can handle herself and baby will get herself in trouble looking to nurse from someone who doesn't want her to. I would get her in a stall and handle her a lot more. If she isn't halter broke yet you should get her leading. Work on desensitizing her to touch by holding her on a lead and brushing her lots starting at her shoulder or wherever she doesn't mind you touching her and working your way gradually all over her body. If she shows any sign of kicking up at you give her a little tug on the lead shank and a gruff "eh eh" - let her know that is not acceptable behaviour. You need to be firm but kind to her always remembering she is just a baby and she is trying to keep from being attacked. Predators sneak up and attack from behind and horses buck and kick to save their lives. She is likely a pretty intelligent little girl as mom is boss mare and is likely intelligent too.
 

SandyWI

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You have to "punish" the body part which offended. I'd carry a lightweight stick, that has some give to it with me. The minute she kicks her back legs, slap the back of her legs with the stick. Not so hard you leave a mark, but at least hard enough that she feels it. I've never had a mini do this, but I had an Arab that I was working around and when I reached out and touched his hip he kicked. missed me, thankfully! I had a manure fork in my hand at the time and I slapped him above the hocks with it and he never ever kicked again.

don't beat the horse, but make it aware that kicking brings on a bit of a sting!

As for the bucking, I think a lot of foals like to buck. But if it's a chronic problem, I would do the same thing with the stick. I've had horses all my life, and this usually cures the problem, but you have to do it immediately!
 

dannigirl

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I had one that was bucking. I cross tied him in a large space so he couldn't kick anything. I then stood at his side near his neck and just kept rubbing him from front to back--gradually getting closer to his butt. I would calmly tell him 'no' when he would try to buck or kick and push his but down and then continue again and again and again. I would work about 1/2 hour at a time at least once and often twice a day. It took about 10 days to 2 weeks, but I finally got to where I could work my hand down his back, over his butt and down the back of his back legs and he would just stand there. After that, he never bucked at a person again. I don't know if he would buck or kick at another horse because we didn't feed them together. They got to play, but food was in stalls.

Good luck. Mine was older than yours, so you shouldn't have any trouble if you have the time and patience.

Angie
 

Miniv

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I suspect that once you start weaning her, you won't have the aggressive behavior. All of a sudden YOU will be her security.

If she tests you at all, it won't take much more than a quick pop, or a foot stomp with a verbal command. And when she behaves, lots of love and scritches will cement her connection with you.

Right now, she knows she has "big bad mom -- the alpha mare" to back her up in the play ground. Once her back up is missing, she'll be singing a different song!
 

ChrystalPaths

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Ditto what MA said, she's all that and a bag of chips now but take away big bad protective mom and oh deary dear the chewy baby will come out.
 

Maxi'sMinis

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Thanks so much for your experience. I will continue with the training as many of you have said. I think she will come around real quick once Mommy is not there to protect her. will keep a close eye on her when I start to wean. I will leave her with the other mares. Some are her buddies. I think once she moves down that old totem pole the others will leave her alone.
 
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li'l bit

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I would use positive reinforcement. Take a yardstick or riding crop, whatever is long enough to reach behind, and wrap a sock or cloth or small piece of sheepskin around it and duct tape it on so when you touch her with it, it will have a soft and pleasant feel to it. By using this tool you will be able to touch her in the sensitive spots without being in danger of being hurt and you will have more confidence and patience in teaching her to accept being touched, anywhere.

Then, with her in halter and lead just start rubbing her with it in the places she accepts contact already. Once she is relaxed with that, start moving it ever so slightly back and rub, rub, rub. When she allows you to move even a part of an inch back, stop and give her a good 30 seconds or so of scritchies in her favorite spots. Then repeat starting at a safe place and try to work your way back another 1/4 to 1/2 inch again. If she kicks or bucks that means she is just not feeling safe with it that far back, so just totally ignore it and start rubbing her in the safe places again. Just keep doing this and try to work on it for 3 to 5 minutes each time you handle her. Once you get the feel for it and she understands what is happening you will be surprised at how quickly you progress. She will learn to trust you and know that you are not going to push her into something she doesn't understand.

Like a previous poster said, we need to teach our horses that they will be safe when we touch them ANYWHERE. It is their instinct to protect those vulnerable areas and it is our responsibility to help them to understand that we are not a danger to them.

Your goal should be to eventually get her to go "HO, HUM" when you touch her anywhere, between the hind legs, her udder, her belly, her rectum (in case you need to take her temperature), all around and under her tail, and of course ALL parts of her head. Once she is HO, HUM with the stick, then repeat the whole process with your hands. It takes just a few minutes a day but it will save you SO much messing around and save her any anxiety in the many years to come when doing daily tasks.

I have used this method several times with horses that do not like being touched somewhere and have had excellent results with it. I feel it helps with creating a trusting bond with the horse and I wouldn't do it any other way.
 

Maxi'sMinis

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I would use positive reinforcement. Take a yardstick or riding crop, whatever is long enough to reach behind, and wrap a sock or cloth or small piece of sheepskin around it and duct tape it on so when you touch her with it, it will have a soft and pleasant feel to it. By using this tool you will be able to touch her in the sensitive spots without being in danger of being hurt and you will have more confidence and patience in teaching her to accept being touched, anywhere.

Then, with her in halter and lead just start rubbing her with it in the places she accepts contact already. Once she is relaxed with that, start moving it ever so slightly back and rub, rub, rub. When she allows you to move even a part of an inch back, stop and give her a good 30 seconds or so of scritchies in her favorite spots. Then repeat starting at a safe place and try to work your way back another 1/4 to 1/2 inch again. If she kicks or bucks that means she is just not feeling safe with it that far back, so just totally ignore it and start rubbing her in the safe places again. Just keep doing this and try to work on it for 3 to 5 minutes each time you handle her. Once you get the feel for it and she understands what is happening you will be surprised at how quickly you progress. She will learn to trust you and know that you are not going to push her into something she doesn't understand.

Like a previous poster said, we need to teach our horses that they will be safe when we touch them ANYWHERE. It is their instinct to protect those vulnerable areas and it is our responsibility to help them to understand that we are not a danger to them.

Your goal should be to eventually get her to go "HO, HUM" when you touch her anywhere, between the hind legs, her udder, her belly, her rectum (in case you need to take her temperature), all around and under her tail, and of course ALL parts of her head. Once she is HO, HUM with the stick, then repeat the whole process with your hands. It takes just a few minutes a day but it will save you SO much messing around and save her any anxiety in the many years to come when doing daily tasks.

I have used this method several times with horses that do not like being touched somewhere and have had excellent results with it. I feel it helps with creating a trusting bond with the horse and I wouldn't do it any other way.
Absolutely the best idea with the crop and sock. I will start this right away. Sounds like you have read some Clinton Anderson. I just never thought of this technique. Yeah those little flying hooves are killer plus she can strike something and hurt her hoof or lower leg. Very good.
 

li'l bit

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Yeh, Clinton and a few dozen others. That's one of the things I love about horses. There is always something to learn no matter how long I've been at it.

Good Luck with your adorable little girl.
 

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