Breeding Small Mares...YOUNG!

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I am negotiating right now to purchase a 3 year old mare, and she is only 29" and if foal for 2009. Is this something I should be considerned with? I do like the mare a lot, and am excited about the foal. I just dont want to buy something I will have problems foaling every year. I am an emotional person and do NOT want to add to the risk of foaling. Any thoughts???
 
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Little Wolf Ranch

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Well, how tall is the stallion she is bred to and what kind of bone density does he have? Is there any way you can see pictures of his foals to see if they are refined or "bulky"? Her being 3 years old and in foal doesn't bother me at all as that is my practice to breed for the first time at 3 years old as she will be or close to being 4 years old when she has the foal.

My main concern isn't that she is 29" tall, 3 years old and pregnant but how tall the stallion is and what kind of bone density he has and what kind of foals he throws.

Of course, there can be complications with taller horses as well during foaling so size isn't the only factor.

Hope this helps!
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~Katie~
 

Riverdance

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This mare is 3 years old now, so she was bred as a 2 year old, and she is only 29" tall? I would not breed any 2 year old, let alone one who is that tiny. I do not care how tall the stallion is. But if he is tall and heavy boned, I would especially worry!!
 

midnight star stables

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This mare is 3 years old now, so she was bred as a 2 year old, and she is only 29" tall? I would not breed any 2 year old, let alone one who is that tiny. I do not care how tall the stallion is. But if he is tall and heavy boned, I would especially worry!!
I agree. Should be fine but I wish it wasn't something you had to deal with.
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Songcatcher

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I am negotiating right now to purchase a 3 year old mare, and she is only 29" and if foal for 2009. Is this something I should be considerned with? I do like the mare a lot, and am excited about the foal. I just dont want to buy something I will have problems foaling every year. I am an emotional person and do NOT want to add to the risk of foaling. Any thoughts???
I prefer not to breed 2 year olds. I know some do and they foal successfully. I have bought some mares bred as 2 year olds and had no problem with them, but still prefer to wait until they are 3 to breed.

However, I want to address the last part of your statement. If you are a very emotional person, you are asking for trouble breeding any size and any age. Watch the forum. Lots of foals are lost and sometimes the mares lost also. Even VERY experienced breeders sometimes lose foals. The most difficult foaling I have had to date (and hope to ever have) was a 32 inch 4 year old mare that was bred to a 29 inch refined stallion. I nearly lost the mare as well as the foal.

Breeding is a tough business. Terrible things will happen sooner or later. If you are very emotional, I would suggest buying a foal and leaving the breeding to someone else. JMO
 

lil hoofbeats

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However, I want to address the last part of your statement. If you are a very emotional person, you are asking for trouble breeding any size and any age. Watch the forum. Lots of foals are lost and sometimes the mares lost also. Even VERY experienced breeders sometimes lose foals. The most difficult foaling I have had to date (and hope to ever have) was a 32 inch 4 year old mare that was bred to a 29 inch refined stallion. I nearly lost the mare as well as the foal.

Breeding is a tough business. Terrible things will happen sooner or later. If you are very emotional, I would suggest buying a foal and leaving the breeding to someone else. JMO

Well said, Songcatcher, breeding horses is not for the"faint of Heart"
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nnadams

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I do not have the experience of many of the posters here, but here are my thoughts and opinions. If you do not want to add the risk of a foaling, but you really like the mare, then maybe you could negotiate to take delivery of the mare after the foaling. Of course the price would go up, but the stress of foaling a mare out would not be on you. I am an emotional person too in that I get so attached and do not want anything to happen to my horses, but I LOVE the foaling. I have had 4 foals here and I love the experience and the foals! They are so precious!
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One of the foals and maybe even my mare might not have made it if I had not been there to assist. I would have been devastated! If you are going to take on the responsibility of a bred mare or breeding, you are going to spend a lot of time at home and have a lot of sleepless nights. All the time and effort are worth it to me because I love my horses so much. They bring me a lot of joy. You just have to decide if you want to make that kind of commitment.

If you do decide you want to go through the emotional roller coaster of foaling (
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) , I would personally suggest starting out with an older mare (bought from an honest, responsible breeder), who has a history of foaling with no problem and who is bred to a smaller refined stud. Have the breeder tell you everything about her foaling experiences - all her signs and behaviors and then watch her like a hawk when it comes time. Make sure you educate yourself well on foaling and if you could find an experienced friend nearby, that would sure help, too!
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Let us know what you decide!
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Well, how tall is the stallion she is bred to and what kind of bone density does he have? Is there any way you can see pictures of his foals to see if they are refined or "bulky"? Her being 3 years old and in foal doesn't bother me at all as that is my practice to breed for the first time at 3 years old as she will be or close to being 4 years old when she has the foal.
My main concern isn't that she is 29" tall, 3 years old and pregnant but how tall the stallion is and what kind of bone density he has and what kind of foals he throws.

Of course, there can be complications with taller horses as well during foaling so size isn't the only factor.

Hope this helps!
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~Katie~

The stallion is a bit dense in bone structure. And he is a full 34." His foals are tall, but refined at birth. And the mare was bred at 2 will be delivering at 3...
 
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I am negotiating right now to purchase a 3 year old mare, and she is only 29" and if foal for 2009. Is this something I should be considerned with? I do like the mare a lot, and am excited about the foal. I just dont want to buy something I will have problems foaling every year. I am an emotional person and do NOT want to add to the risk of foaling. Any thoughts???
I prefer not to breed 2 year olds. I know some do and they foal successfully. I have bought some mares bred as 2 year olds and had no problem with them, but still prefer to wait until they are 3 to breed.

However, I want to address the last part of your statement. If you are a very emotional person, you are asking for trouble breeding any size and any age. Watch the forum. Lots of foals are lost and sometimes the mares lost also. Even VERY experienced breeders sometimes lose foals. The most difficult foaling I have had to date (and hope to ever have) was a 32 inch 4 year old mare that was bred to a 29 inch refined stallion. I nearly lost the mare as well as the foal.

Breeding is a tough business. Terrible things will happen sooner or later. If you are very emotional, I would suggest buying a foal and leaving the breeding to someone else. JMO
Well, I have lost foals before, and its certainly not easy...I am emotional but I love the aspect of breeding, my first foal ever is my biggest baby now! The rewards are amazing! :)
 

Little Wolf Ranch

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Whoops I read it as "is being bred in 2009" my bad. 

I would be concerned with her and watch her very carefully especially since the stallion is about 5" taller than her. I would advise my vet about the issue so you would have some back-up on your side if you did decide to get her. 
 

nnadams

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Whoa! I would not suggest that mare to you! Wonder why in the world the breeder would do that to the poor little mare so young and for her first time!!
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I do not have the experience of many of the posters here, but here are my thoughts and opinions. If you do not want to add the risk of a foaling, but you really like the mare, then maybe you could negotiate to take delivery of the mare after the foaling. Of course the price would go up, but the stress of foaling a mare out would not be on you. I am an emotional person too in that I get so attached and do not want anything to happen to my horses, but I LOVE the foaling. I have had 4 foals here and I love the experience and the foals! They are so precious!
default_wub.png
One of the foals and maybe even my mare might not have made it if I had not been there to assist. I would have been devastated! If you are going to take on the responsibility of a bred mare or breeding, you are going to spend a lot of time at home and have a lot of sleepless nights. All the time and effort are worth it to me because I love my horses so much. They bring me a lot of joy. You just have to decide if you want to make that kind of commitment.
If you do decide you want to go through the emotional roller coaster of foaling (
default_ohnoes.jpg
default_pray.gif
default_cheeky-smiley-006.gif
default_crybaby.gif
default_gaah.gif
) , I would personally suggest starting out with an older mare (bought from an honest, responsible breeder), who has a history of foaling with no problem and who is bred to a smaller refined stud. Have the breeder tell you everything about her foaling experiences - all her signs and behaviors and then watch her like a hawk when it comes time. Make sure you educate yourself well on foaling and if you could find an experienced friend nearby, that would sure help, too!
default_wink.png


Let us know what you decide!
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I will be taking delivery after the foaling, that much is certain! And I use a foaling center for all of my foaling (my horses don't live with me so I don't have any choice there!)

Thanks for your thoughts, I really appreciate it!
 
S

StarRidgeAcres

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Well, how tall is the stallion she is bred to and what kind of bone density does he have? Is there any way you can see pictures of his foals to see if they are refined or "bulky"? Her being 3 years old and in foal doesn't bother me at all as that is my practice to breed for the first time at 3 years old as she will be or close to being 4 years old when she has the foal.
My main concern isn't that she is 29" tall, 3 years old and pregnant but how tall the stallion is and what kind of bone density he has and what kind of foals he throws.

Of course, there can be complications with taller horses as well during foaling so size isn't the only factor.

Hope this helps!
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~Katie~

The stallion is a bit dense in bone structure. And he is a full 34." His foals are tall, but refined at birth. And the mare was bred at 2 will be delivering at 3...
Well, this is from someone who does breed 29" mares...I would NOT want this combo as you've described above. Sounds like a recipe for disaster to me. Sorry, but that's how I feel. I wish you well in your decision.
 

Windhaven

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I have had my share of experience in foaling and I personally would probably stay clear of this situation. If you are having to question whether or not you should get this 29" mare that is in foal to a 34" stallion then your gut feelings are probably right.

This is not a very good situation especially for someone who gets real emotionally involved. Foaling mares out is emotional and heart breaking, so why get one that has a very good potential of having problems during delivery. Leave her to someone who has the experience. For one the mare is tiny, very young, the stallion is to big for her first time foal and there is a very good possibility that she may require help when foaling.

If you are having doubts keep looking for another mare. There are so many for sale and I am sure there is one that would be a better buy without the added risk.

If you decide to get her maybe it would be wise to find someone to foal her out for you.

Good luck in whatever you decide.
 
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Jill

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I can see it from two sides. While I do not plan to breed 2yo fillies/mares, this one is already bred. If I thought I would be able to do as right by her as any one else -- and better than some potential owners -- and she was really, really what I wanted, I might go on and buy her... I actually did just that, same kind of situation, back in 1999 and all went very well. The mare is already in the situation, so it's up to you to decide if you want to see her through it or let someone else -- knowing you aren't the one who chose for her to currently be in foal.

My observation is similar to what's already been talked about here in this thread. Breeding horses, especially minis, is VERY emotional. We had minis so long, showed them, learned a lot and really spent time building a herd before doing our own breeding. We'd had a couple mares we bought in foal along the way, but 2008 was our first year to be having our own, planned foals and we'd planned for a decade. Still, our very first mare to go into labor was a very bad situation. We lost her and her foal, despite our vet being with us all through the night until dawn.

You have to realize these things can happen and prepare yourself emotionally up front. It was a horrible experience, but I think part of why we were able to get through it and be there fully in the game days later for our next mare to foal went into labor is because we'd prepared ourselves up front that we might have that kind of terrible situation. It's not "unheard of" in minis and loosing your mare and her foal is the ultimate terrible consequence that does sometimes happen.

EDIT: I just now saw the post stating the mare is 29" but the stallion is 34"... while I feel bone structure is way more important than the height, the age of the mare and the large size difference would also scare me away from this mare in anything other than a needs to be rescued scenario.
 
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Maple Hollow Farm

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I personally wouldnt take the chance on a small mare bred to a huge stallion like that no matter how refined he is! I bred a two year old once and she was 31.5" tall bred to a refined 29" stallion that throws super refined foals but she still had problems because she just wasnt old enough to be physically ready for that yet. If no one would have been there we would have lost the mare and foal for sure! We now wait to breed our horses when they are three. This is just my personal experience though and it is still up to you but it is good to know what can happen. Just keep in mind that there are tons of great horses out there at decent prices right now. Good luck on whatever you decide.
 

barnbum

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I'd pass on this one... or as suggested purchase the mare after foaling... the height difference wuold make me nervous.

Good luck deciding.
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wendyluvsminis

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I was nervous enough last summer, with my 29 inch mare whom I bought in foal to a 33 inch, fine boned stallion. It was Lottie's second foal and I watched her like a hawk! And missed the foaling by about a half hour! When I made it out to the barn, mommy and baby were both standing up and looking great! Her foal was 21 inches tall! I'm glad, when I gave birth, that my baby was alot more than 8 inches shorter than me!!! Lottie sure likes to have her "private" time--this year she was accidentally bred by my 30 inch trouble-making donkey jack, and I never saw it! Thru the fence? I am excited to see how big/tiny this little mule will be! Above is a picture of Lottie and her son, Troubadour. He was almost as big as her before being weaned!
 
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Katiean

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I would not have bred a mare that was 29" to a stud even 33" let alone 34". I would have concern for the mare with the stud being so big and she is so small. I also would not have bred her at that age. I bought a bred mare and she was just 3 when she foaled. We didn't have any problems but she was 31"-32" ane the stud was 33 3/4". The problem with breeding a mare that young is she is still a baby herself. It is like asking a 14 year old girl to get pregnent. We all know we wouldn't do that. Anyway, if you aren't tough I wouldn't get involved in breeding at all. I have been around livestock all my life. I have amputated a leg (on a fur animal) to save a life. I was not prepaired to deliver a dead foal which I did for a friend. I was kind of bothered by it for a couple of days. I am not tough as nails but I am not a softy either. So, unless you can handle dissappointment and babies dying or maybe ending up with a dwarf I would not breed Miniature Horses.
 

Darkstar

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eeehhh gads!!! Mother Nature can only do so much!!! This match-up should not have been done IMHO. Especially with one so young and small! I hope this girl does okay. I don't mean to judge, but this match-up is one I would not ever consider doing no matter what the build of the mare or stallion is. I have to say that I've seen it done (well on paper/documentation) but, I couldn't recommend doing this. Some bigger mares are ready to breed a 2 but I think the smaller ones need more time and consideration on who they are bred to. Just my opinion ;)
 

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