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Marnie

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Are these bad for donkeys the way they are with mini horses? Also, do donkeys get in foal easier than mini horses and stay in foal? Do you call it "foal" with a donkey? I don't want to sound like an idiot! Are they prone to late term abortions? I have alot to learn and have been reading, reading but can't find some answers so will be bugging you guys here on the donkey forum.
 

Marty

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Are these bad for donkeys the way they are with mini horses?

[SIZE=14pt][/SIZE]

100% toxic

http://www.oregonvos.net/~jrachau/shelter.htm

The following is my recommendation for feeding and maintaining donkeys. It is a recommendation only and should not be considered professional advice. Author is not a veterinarian and accepts no responsibility for any ill effects that could occur as a result of following this guide. It is always recommended to consult your local veterinarian or an equine specialist (preferably one with knowledge of donkeys). ~ jar ~

Shelter is an absolute must for any contained animal, and this includes donkeys. A three sided run-in shed is ideal. Because of their desert beginnings, a donkey doesn't handle extreme cold as well as most horses can. Donkeys need to be able to escape from harsh elements - cold as well as hot. The worst culprit being wind chill. An adequate shelter goes a long way in making sure your donkey stays comfortable in any condition.

It's a good idea to face your shelter away from the prevailing wind, and also make sure you are not locating it in a low spot that would become impassable with mud during certain times of the year. Use wood shavings if locally convenient (make sure they do not contain toxic substances such as Black Walnut bark which could be fatal) to keep the shelter and surrounding area a dry and comfortable place for the donkey be in.

Donkeys don't seem to mind sharing their space with each other on most occasions. Good humored and good natured, they will buddy up and most generally allow everyone a chance to get out of the weather, which isn't necessarily the norm with their cousin, the horse. It wouldn't even hurt to have a corral or pen attachment to your shelter, for there will be times that you won't want your donkey to be out on pasture (like when the grass is really coming on in spring!), or you might need to contain a sick or injured donkey.

Good shelter is important during foaling time - especially during inclement weather.

Photo by J. Rachau

Picking up manure from out of shelters and pens is important. If you cannot haul it off daily, pick an out of the way spot for your manure pile, and either spread it in the hottest part of summer or advertise it for fertilizer. You can also use prepared stall 'sweeteners' on urine spots to help control the ammonia smell (which the buildup of can harm equine lungs). Picking up fecal matter means less smell, flies, and parasite contamination. You and your donkey will be much happier if his home is clean and neat. A place to proudly showcase and to pleasantly spend time with your longeared friend.

Shelter is necessary for the comfort and health of any donkey. They tend to hate water, whether it's under their feet or falling from the sky, most do their utmost best to avoid it. I don't really blame them, their desert coat seems to soak up moisture rather than repel it. A damp coat that never is able to dry encourages fungus and other skin infections. A cold, soggy donkey is not a happy camper.
 
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Lisa-Ruff N Tuff Minis

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while i dont have donkeys i did have several black walnut trees on my property in CA and in fact my horses loved to eat them before they got very hard (while they were still green) my vettalked to Davis several times and it isnt the walnuts themselves that are toxic or even the leaves but the actual bark and wood
 

MeadowRidge Farm

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Hi Marnie, ask away, its the only way to learn...and everyone on this forum really seems to be helpful with answers. My donkeys get in foal very easy, even when I am breeding a mini donkey to my mini horse stallion, he has no problem getting a jenny to settle either, but I have had ALOT of people ask me what the trick is for breeding hinnys. The only thing I have figures out is to sire a hinny the horse has to have a lower number of chromosmal pairs, then the dam does , and a horse has 64 and donkeys have 62, so yes, that can be a problem, I just hit it lucky and have a stallion who "gets the job done". As for breeding jack to jenny, mine seem to settle fast and stay in foal. (YUP---called foaling!) Hoping Shawna and Colleen jump on and add to what I said. Corinne
 

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