Quantcast

Beet Pulp

Miniature Horse Talk Forums

Help Support Miniature Horse Talk Forums:

Intexas2stay

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2002
Messages
123
Reaction score
3
I am in no way a feed expert.... But at the ranch where I worked, my boss is very smart when it comes to feeding horses. She is the type to go to an auction, buy the SKINNIEST most pathetic horses I have ever seen, and within a year turn them into beautiful examples of what love can do for them.

I have seen many posts about beet pulp. I dont know that much about it, but I would like to share what my prior boss did when feeding her horses, in the hopes it can clear up some confusion.

She at any time has over 40 BIG horses. They are all kept on dry lots, a few in stalls, depending on if they are there for training or breeding, or just her own. The majority of the horses are paired up with a buddy of similar size and feeding needs. Two horses to a one acre fenced lot.

She also has a five acre pasture where she keeps the old folks. These are the horses with special needs, such as slow eaters, or so old only a few teeth remain. Usually there are at max 5 horses kept in this pasture. Each horse has a special fenced area for eating. These horses are fed a special diet of a complete pellet and beet pulp only. NO HAY what so ever. They are fed twice a day along with everyone else. The pellets are put in a bucket with the beet pulp and water added and its allowed to sit untill soaked. The amount for her horses is one big coffee can of pellet and one big coffee can of beet pulp. Her horses look GREAT on this diet. Even her older mare who she does many trail rides, gives lessons on, and does drill team on, gets the same amount as the lazy ones, and her energy and body are in top shape.

For the really ragged ones, we would feed them 3 times a day. And the weight came on fast.

There were times when EVERY horse on her place got the pellet and beet pulp diet, especially when it was cold, or windy enough to blow hay away. There were times when all of her horses get the mix for 2 weeks at a time. We wouldnt feed hay then.

I know a horse can be perfectly healthy and happy living only on pellets and beet pulp. From the very young to the very old. I do feel it is a great substitute for hay when hay might be in short supply, or maybe a horse is sick or old or just needs weight. It also seems a cheaper solution to hay, as beet pulp goes much farther than a bale of hay.

Hope this helps.

My boss is a certified John Lyons trainer. She is very well respected and many people seek her help for many reasons. Her name is Rene Ilse. You can look her up at the John Lyons web site.

I once watched her take a pony mare who was TERRIFIED of trailers, with 3 lessons, turn her into a self loading pony!!!! That was cool to witness.
 

JewelsOK

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2008
Messages
116
Reaction score
0
Location
Oklahoma
Thanks for the info. My 26 year old quarter horse gelding is not a huge hay eater and tends to drop a little bit of weight in winter so I just might have to try the beet pulp. The only thing is there isn't heated water where I board him.... Will cold water work? I'll have to think of something. This will be our first winter at this place.
 

Reijel's Mom

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2006
Messages
1,698
Reaction score
1
Location
Conroy, IA
Thanks for the info. My 26 year old quarter horse gelding is not a huge hay eater and tends to drop a little bit of weight in winter so I just might have to try the beet pulp. The only thing is there isn't heated water where I board him.... Will cold water work? I'll have to think of something. This will be our first winter at this place.
Maybe buy a heated water bucket you can keep plugged in somewhere and allow the beet pulp to soak in that water before feeding. Doesn't have to be HOT water.
 

SammyL

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2004
Messages
441
Reaction score
0
Location
MN
It will mold quicker if it is soaked in hot water.

Good luck with your old guy.

Thanks for the info.

 

Intexas2stay

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2002
Messages
123
Reaction score
3
Julie,

I dont know how cold it gets where you are, but we were in Texas, and even in the 30's wed use cold water from the hose. The horses didnt seem to mind the temp of the food, and they ate it all within an hour, so it didnt have time to freeze or get moldy. I would introduce your old guy to the beet pulp now, so he knows he can eat it, before winter sets in. There is nothing worse than having to stand outside in the cold trying to convince a horse he can eat whats new on the menu. I really think the beet pulp will do him wonders, especially if hes a hard winter keeper. There is no reason you couldnt just slowly switch him now, and keep him on it for the rest of his days. If only I had known of the beet pulp when I had my own horses....

Good luck with him!!!!
 

Latest posts

Top