attitude after gelding

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choklitbean

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I'm getting a little nervous here. I've only personally myself had one horse gelded before, a 5 year old welsh. He was gentle from day one so I have no real reference to go on.

I've always been told by the big horse people that there is often a huge difference in attitude afterward, however I've been reading different things and been told by some mini people here that in the mini's there really isn't much difference from before gelding to afterward "What you see is what you get" were the exact words of a local breeder who I'm told is respected in this area.

Please tell me these things I've been "hearing" are wrong! I love this little guy dearly but the fact is he has a nasty streak in him. One woman tried to tell me that "it's normal studdy behaviour" - that's a load of bunk. I've had two stallions of my own, handled my aunts QH stallion and colts, and rode my grandfathers Arab stallion for years - this is NOT "normal". My aunt (who has gelded a multitude of colts) tells me that he'll likely come around and I'll see more of his sweetness (he can be very sweet when he wants to).

Okay, I get nervous whenever any of my animals are having surgery, I'm probably just freaking out over nothing, right?!?
 

capall beag

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I will just give you my limited experience!

I currently have a proven 3 yr old stallion, a 2 yr old unproven stallion and have owned a 4 yr old stallion before.

All of mine are incredibly sweet NOT a mean bone in their body! Do they get excited around mares in season YES do they become mean NO, they become excited and could accidently hurt you BUT their personality is the same!!!!!

I think a sweet horse is sweet as a colt, a stallion or a gelding.

Might gelding him make him calm down some sure, will it make him the sweetest guy around I doubt it!!

My stallions are lovely, sweet boys and are a pleasure to have around even with their mares around.

Just giving you my experiences!!


IMO meaness is there because of personality not being a stallion.

I often hear of colts, young stallions being nippy too, neither of mine display any negative behaviour!

BTW I can't take credit for these boys exceptional behaviour because I didn't breed them or raise them I am just lucky enough to own them now!


Good Luck with your boy!
 

Pepipony

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I only have one mini, Tonto ( miniMe) , and only because he kept running away from home to be here
He was a little peach untill that testosterone hit and wham, he was an obnoxious brat. Total Jekyl and Hyde. So he was snipped and voila, my little peach was back.

After being around big horses I can see that some studs are great, some arent, guess its all in how they handle the testosterone.
 

rabbitsfizz

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I think you may be confusing frustration for nastiness!! A stallion that has no "work" may well kick and bite a bit out of just that- some don't some do, it depends on the basic temperament of the animal, but this does not mean he is nasty, just a bit "hot". If this is the cause then gelding will bring him back to normal but, as you must know, not teach him the manners he should have learned long ago!! So, geld him ASAP and then get down to a few basic social graces!!
 

choklitbean

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He's the kind who needs his exercise daily that's for sure. As for manners he's come miles. The problem with him is you never know who you're going to meet when you go out in the morning. He might be fine three days in a row and then greet you with his teeth on the fourth, all inspite of being worked every day. He's good with me and on his better days my 13 year old son will walk him dry for me after lunging. However, I will NEVER let my son go in and catch him because Chinook still occassionally guards his territory.

He was very dangerous to feed at first, but I got him to the place where I could go in and sit right on the feeder with my hands in the grain/hay. This was only me though, no one else could even reach over the fence without being threatened and as much as I've asked no one is willing to "take him on" although yesterday my mother finally said she'd try handling him. When I brought the mare home we "lost" about six weeks worth of efforts and he got nasty with me again also, however we've pretty much dealt with that now.

It isn't fear either, this pony has NO fear. Honestly I've never met a horse ever as bold as he is, but I've also been told that that's a mini trait.

The people who had him bought him at the auction when he was a year and a half old. They were terrified of him and never taught him a thing. I do have to wonder though why such a nicely put together horse was "dumped". A horse this nice isn't a fluke.
 

Jill

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Okay, I have had six minis gelded. Four were under 1yo, and I couldn't tell a change in personality. Two were done early this spring and were senior show stallions at the time. Their personalities DID NOT change in that they have the same good sparks in them. The only thing that has changed, and it has taken several months, is that they do not scream to the mares and do that "huh-huh huh-huh huh-huh" talk. I wouldn't change a thing and one of those I gelded as a senior stallion is my 5yo Derby, a once in a lifetime horse. I adore him even more now that he's a gelding, which would seem impossible if you knew how much I loved him to begin with!!! He has always been one cooperative and intelligent little man. If you do not have plans to breed him next year, really, he will be a happier guy for being gelded and easier for you to manage in that he can go in with other horses, etc.
 

Minimor

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We bought a stallion as an unhandled 2 year old--he had never learned his manners & was very full of himself when we brought him home. His previous owner was afraid of him, and he no doubt knew it. He did learn very fast & came to respect us. He was bad about biting, but did learn to tone that down. He knew he wasn't supposed to bite, but it seemed at times he couldn't help himself. Out of no where he'd make a grab, and then the look on his face would so clearly convey horror and the thought "OMG, what have I DONE???" He wasn't mean, just very full of himself. If he got lots of exercise, whether on turn out or by being worked, he was much better, but if he stood around too much he'd have a hard time keeping his feet on the ground & his teeth to himself. I had no worries about him passing a bad dispostion onto his offspring & we do have some lovely foals by him (they are very sweet natured, but do have attitude--they think very highly of themselves.)--but overall we liked our younger stallion better and decided to geld this one. He was gelded this past April, and though it took a couple of months, he is much more laid back now. He's still full of himself, but different from when he was a stallion. The biting is gone.

Like Rabbitsfizz said, gelding doesn't magically fix bad manners, but I'd say it does mellow a horse otherwise. I'd expect your boy to become much less unpredictable and easier to handle once he's gelded.
 

choklitbean

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we do have some lovely foals by him (they are very sweet natured, but do have attitude--they think very highly of themselves.)--but overall we liked our younger stallion better and decided to geld this one. He was gelded this past April, and though it took a couple of months, he is much more laid back now. He's still full of himself, but different from when he was a stallion. The biting is gone.
Thank you, feeling much better now. After hearing so much "minis don't change" talk I was really starting to worry, uh, I mean wonder.


"Full of himself" that's a good description of him actually.

The appointment was made last week and the vet comes Wednesday. As much as I love him there are just too many kids coming and going here and unpredictable teeth and feet just won't work. My aunt said to give him a good five months since he had been used for breeding before I got him. The timing is perfect since the neices and nephews won't be back until spring.

Thanks for everyones input. I've been on a few forums before and was really nervous about coming on here, but you all are so very kind and patient with stupid newbie questions - and I'm sure I'll have a ton more.
 

RAPfrosty

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All I can say is the one and only horse I had gelded (as a yearling) mellowed out a lot! He was a playful and crazy colt who nipped a lot and although he was sweet he deffinatly had a wild side. Now he's sweet, mellow, cuddly, never bites, and is just a fantastic little guy. I would highly recommend gelding! The change was practicly immediate and with a little training his manners and disposition are much much much better. And if you are worried, like my dad was, that they will lose their quirky spunk, not to fear, Fever is just as silly as ever, just much easier to handle!

Good luck with your boy!
 

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