Appreciation from me and Finnick

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PaintMeAMini

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This is an appreciation post from me and Finnick and I guess you can say a story about this wonderful boy.
When I bought Finnick he had been in a stall with a pregnant mare for months with no turnout. I had no background information on him except that he was around 6, his hooves had recently been trimmed, and that he was chill. The information was false, he was 12, his toes were extremely long and he had no heel, and he was by no means chill. He was horrified of people and didn’t let anyone touch him. I couldn’t get a halter on him or even come within a 6ft radius of him. There was also the stifle problem which I was not warned of when I asked if he had any history of injuries or sicknesses. I wondered how I would even go about his training and if working with him would even do any good. I started off with the only thing I had ever been taught and that was to ignore his clear trauma and treat him like he had never been abused or neglected. After a while he had only gotten worse and his fear of people really began to show. He wouldn’t charge but he would turn his butt threatening to kick and bite at you if you got near him. I cringe now thinking about the fact I didn’t realize it was the way I was acting and “training” him that was causing more harm than good. I began to look at gentle ways of training horses and come across holistic training. Holistic training is training a horse without the use of force, fear, food, or trauma. I started learning about the five fundamentals of training and taking things slow. Flight zone was another thing I learned about and how to read a horses body language. Now I see Finnick as a totally different horse. He is patient, kind, smart, submissive and just an all around good boy. All those who I watched about holistic and gentle training changed the way I train horses and changed Finnick’s life for the better, thank you. Thank you to all who gave me advice on how to better myself and for the wonderful videos!
 

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MaryFlora

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You wrote and shared a powerful story, Paintme. When you bought Finnick (love his name!) you both took a trip you didn’t quite expect! Poor Finnick probably gave up hope a long time ago, and then you came. 😊

He looks a real darling. What do you enjoy doing with Finnick, or hope to do in the future? By the way, hugging and loving them are both viable activities! 🤗

Congratulations on your joint success!
 

PaintMeAMini

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You wrote and shared a powerful story, Paintme. When you bought Finnick (love his name!) you both took a trip you didn’t quite expect! Poor Finnick probably gave up hope a long time ago, and then you came. 😊

He looks a real darling. What do you enjoy doing with Finnick, or hope to do in the future? By the way, hugging and loving them are both viable activities! 🤗

Congratulations on your joint success!
Thank you! Right now we are building muscle, desensitizing, and building confidence using pressure and release. In the future I plan on him being confident and able to go to a show with Faye to keep her calm and him be calm. Due to his stifle locking up he can’t show, lunge or do any active activities but he will still stay with me as long as he lives. ❤️
 

Kelly

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Due to his stifle locking up he can’t show, lunge or do any active activities but he will still stay with me as long as he lives. ❤

I’ve heard that with a locking stifle you just cant do tight small circles or jump, but I think you should be able to drive him if you wanted to. Is this true? Has anyone else heard that it is ok to drive a horse with locking stifle??
 

Silver City Heritage Farmstead

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I've seen many, many horses over the years that had perfectly useful lives as show, trail and/or harness horses. Yes, tight turns seem to be the most challenging for some. It just depends on....well....not really sure.

My 1/2 Arab 1/2 Tennessee Walker gelding (and first personal horse 🥰) was very mildly affected on his left side. I mounted mostly on the right. I didn't lunge much, as that seemed to bother him. Working in a 30 foot or larger round pen, with 18" cavaletti (He was 14 hands), keeping him on a 4-5 week trim schedule, and keeping him in at least moderate work meant I didn't see any symptoms. He was also very pretty and with plenty of scope over fences, though we never competed over 2'3".

If he was out of shape, out of balance from trims (he'd out a poor farrier from the first trim) or overdue for a trim, I'd start to see symptoms.

I have an acquaintance who had many (6+) with stifle problems in her herd. My observations in her circumstances: if the horses were underweight, poorly trimmed or out of work, there were issues. Some of hers had SEVERE locking up on both sides.

So, if Mr. Finnick decides he likes some little activities, or would like to pull a little cart, use your best judgement and do whatever you're both comfortable with.
 

PaintMeAMini

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I've seen many, many horses over the years that had perfectly useful lives as show, trail and/or harness horses. Yes, tight turns seem to be the most challenging for some. It just depends on....well....not really sure.

My 1/2 Arab 1/2 Tennessee Walker gelding (and first personal horse 🥰) was very mildly affected on his left side. I mounted mostly on the right. I didn't lunge much, as that seemed to bother him. Working in a 30 foot or larger round pen, with 18" cavaletti (He was 14 hands), keeping him on a 4-5 week trim schedule, and keeping him in at least moderate work meant I didn't see any symptoms. He was also very pretty and with plenty of scope over fences, though we never competed over 2'3".

If he was out of shape, out of balance from trims (he'd out a poor farrier from the first trim) or overdue for a trim, I'd start to see symptoms.

I have an acquaintance who had many (6+) with stifle problems in her herd. My observations in her circumstances: if the horses were underweight, poorly trimmed or out of work, there were issues. Some of hers had SEVERE locking up on both sides.

So, if Mr. Finnick decides he likes some little activities, or would like to pull a little cart, use your best judgement and do whatever you're both comfortable with.
He is much better after he come here and started walking ground poles and trimming some of his hay belly off as well as his overgrown toes. The vet said he would be fine to drive and I do plan to train him for it because he is the kind of boy who would love a job but at the moment he is still building confidence and muscle. Thank you for the info!
 

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