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AOTE championship class

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Riverrose28

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for those of you that don't show AMHA I'll try to explain about AOTE classes.

Ametuer Owner Trainer to EXhibit.

At AMHA shows they offer, Ametuer classes and the AOTE according to height.

If you win first or second place you must go into the championship class, which is fine. Here is were I need you alls opinion; four out of five of the ametuer horses are handed off to the ametuers from the trainers, I don't have a problem with this, it is allowed and fine. Trainer horses are not allowed in AOTE and that is a great thing for those that can't afford to hire a trainer, problem is the championship class is combined, that is, the ametuer horses and the AOTE, which consists of the horses that have won first and second are all in the ring together. The AOTE exhibitor doesn't stand a snowballs chance of placing against the professionally trained horses. Do you think that the class should be separated? Have an AOTE championship class and an ametuer championship class. Seems to me the AOTE exhibitor would get very discouraged if they continually have to show against the pro horses.
 

Mini Paradise

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I see your point but would have to disagree with splitting up Amateur and AOTE championahip class. I started showing Amha last year and this year was able to start showing in AOTE. I honestly trained and conditioned my own horses that have never been trained by a professional trainer. At my first show this year my gelding did very good and took a Supreme in the Amateur Supreme class that was offered at this show. Competing against and with trainers is what motivates me to do better and work harder. I like shows with big turn out and competition. I do not want to go to a show and be the only one in my classes. I want to know how my horse compares to others, but really it is only a judges opinion. It is whatever they like (certain type of mini or whatever else). My advice to you is to keep working with your horses and dedicate your time to them and it will pay off in the end. Also it is not against the rules to get advice and lessons from a trainer as long as you dont use your horse. Find a trainer to help you and teach you how they do things. That has worked for me and everything I learn, I use.
 

Maple Hollow Farm

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I see your point to an extent but honestly dont see the need for it to be separated. Although we dont show AMHA very often due to the small number of shows in our area. One of my first AMHA shows I took Champion Amateur Mare and Res Champion Amateur Stallion. None of my horses at that point had ever seen a trainer and I still dont use a trainer unless necessary. True ammy horses can place really well even against those trainer trained ammy horses. I have to agree with Mini Paradise that it makes my hard work pay off and gives me higher goals to have to go up against the pro trained horses!
 

Riverrose28

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I might have missed some details yesterday in my post. I love competitiion, it helps you to earn more points We also have our share of champions in our barn. We have used a trainer before, and also conditioned and fitted our own. What I'm concerned about are the new owners that can't afford a trainer and are working their heart out. We mentored a young lady that has a lovely horse and helped her to clip, fit and condition, her horse was first and second under three judges, she did a very nice job, she got very discouraged in the championship class, but we told her it happens to all of us. Then I got to thinking about it, and it really started me to thinking. Also there would be competition in that class, as there are uaually at least three aote classes, so that would be six horses. Thanks for the opinions, keep em coming.
 

Jean_B

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I think this could be a 'learning moment' for that young lady. Rather than 'it happens' (which is does) - tell her to watch those that win, and learn from them. Maybe it's just my jaded "old lady" perception, but so many young people feel a sense of entitlement and sometimes being taken down a peg or two is a good thing. (certainly wouldn't hurt Justin Bieber...grin). But seriously, everyone needs to learn how to walk before they run. I've been at this game for over 20 years with minis and big horses before that, and I'm still amazed and humbled at all that I don't know. And back to topic, I don't think they need to be separated.
 

Reignmaker Miniatures

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I would be one of the people who show AOTE. I have no access to professional trainers and no funds for them if I did. I admit to showing only lightly especially now that I have discontinued breeding but imo separating them is not necessary. There will always be, in any class entered, people with more experience than those of us just beginning to show horses, maybe they have grown up with show horses, maybe they have access to plenty of input from experienced people and trainers, maybe they are just a natural or maybe they have more time to spend training and use it. Either way, a win is not guaranteed to anyone. If I win I know it is because I worked very hard and the judge that day liked my horse. To go on and win a championship against horses handled by a trainer at some point is just icing on the cake. To not win against them is no different than not winning against anyone else, either their presentation was better (lets face it you don't get into a championship class unless your horse is good enough to be there as a rule) or the judge just like their horse better. Part of showing is learning the ropes and paying your dues, starting out on top is not very common. If you get discouraged because you don't win everything you may be approaching showing from the wrong place. It should be about having fun and showing the world just how fabulous your horse is regardless of the opinion of one person on one day.
 

Riverrose28

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Thank you to all that responded. Sometimes I can't seem to find the answer for the question of why. I'll pass it on. Since we have been showing since 1977 I always told the kids to be a good sport, but seriously, since I questioned this myself I couldn't give a good enough answer, now I can. Thanks
 

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