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Anyone give Remission to pregnant mares?

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luv2ridesaddleseat

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And here was their response.

Whenever you are considering using a product on a pregnant animal you must speak with a veternarian. We are unsure of the side affects it may have on an offspring. We do know that the product is safe as long as they are a year old, not nursing, and not pregnant. Any other situation needs to be discussed with a veternarian. I do apologize I couldn't be of more assistance. If you need anything else please let me know.

Of course I will ask my Vet about this. Anybody else talked to their Vet about this product and pregnant mares? I sure like to hear more than one opinion in case my Vet says it's safe, but someone elses says don't use it.

Thanks, Joyce
 

Robin_C

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Remission is a neutriceutical comprised mainly of magnesium oxide and chromium, and is marketed to the horse at risk for or experiencing laminitis. Mag ox can play an important role in this capacity, especially in the overweight mini. Magnesium is frequently lacking in many of our horses' diets. The jury is still out on how well chromium fits into this mix....it has been reported to help lower glucose levels in humans, and thus is THOUGHT to perhaps have the same action in horses, but this has not been proven. Magnesium, on the other hand, has been proven beneficial in both humans and horses with regard to sugar/insulin management.

I do give Remission to over half of my horses, having switched from Quiessence. Remission has more mag ox per serving than Quiessence and is less expensive. On the other hand, Remission also has more chromium which has been said to depress appetite when fed in excess. I haven't noted a depressed appetite in any of MY minis (LOL!!). Quiessence is an excellent product, no doubt, but due to the number of horses I give the product to, was not cost-effective for me. The Remission is.

That being said, I had a mare with pre- and post-foaling laminitis that I was giving Remission to, and also another nursing mare that trends towards insulin resistance. Both foals developed diarrhea which would be a reasonable side effect given that magnesium can cause diarrhea (Epsom salts is a form of magnesium and when taken orally can result in diarrhea). Once I stopped giving the Remission to the nursing mares, the foal's diarrhea cleared.

Bottom line from my experience, I would not give it to a nursing mare in the future, but I gave it to my pregnant mares without any adverse effect to my knowledge.
 

chandab

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On the other hand, Remission also has more chromium which has been said to depress appetite when fed in excess. I haven't noted a depressed appetite in any of MY minis (LOL!!).
I haven't noticed any appetite suppression in any of mine receiving Remission, I was thinking for minis that might be a good side-effect, but it didn't happen with my minis.

That being said, I had a mare with pre- and post-foaling laminitis that I was giving Remission to, and also another nursing mare that trends towards insulin resistance. Both foals developed diarrhea which would be a reasonable side effect given that magnesium can cause diarrhea (Epsom salts is a form of magnesium and when taken orally can result in diarrhea). Once I stopped giving the Remission to the nursing mares, the foal's diarrhea cleared.
Bottom line from my experience, I would not give it to a nursing mare in the future, but I gave it to my pregnant mares without any adverse effect to my knowledge.
Thank you for the information on possibility of causing diarrhea in a nursing foal. I have a pregnant mare on Remission, and I'll stop it when she foals, just to be safe.
 

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