Quantcast

Another Driving Question

Miniature Horse Talk Forums

Help Support Miniature Horse Talk Forums:

minihorsefrnd

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2007
Messages
171
Reaction score
0
Location
Hampshire, Tennessee
Side Check and Over Check—while I can see the oblivious difference. What does each check do?

I would assume that the over check is used to position the head up higher, but what about the side check, what does it do?

Is there a benefit to using one over the other. How do you determine if you horse needs an over check or side check?

Please explain as I am sure there are others that would like some clarity.

Thanks
 

JourneysEnd

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2007
Messages
911
Reaction score
0
Location
Hockley, Texas
Over check sets the head in position. I don't like these but that is my opinion.

Side checks keeps the horse from putting it's nose to the ground and grazing. In other words, help avoid an accident.

Over checks are NOT allowed at any American Driving Society function.

Side checks are allowed but not required at ADS functions.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

fourhorses

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2003
Messages
190
Reaction score
0
Now that wording I can understand!!

Does the over-check apply to some types of driving and side checks for all?!
 

Alex

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2007
Messages
1,521
Reaction score
0
The original invention named a Check, wasnt to keep a horses head set. It was so the horse didnt reach his neck and get hooked on the cart. Probabally the shafts?. Just some food for thought!

Personally, I dont like checks. When used properly they do help, but no matter how adjusted, it will still yank on a horses mouth.

Back to wich ones better: Journey said it well. IMO, an over check is harsher, and really just keeps the head up. Side checks would help with tucking a nose.

IMO its cheating good training
 

disneyhorse

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Messages
5,382
Reaction score
191
Here is an article I wrote on the subject and posted here on LilBeginnings a couple years back:

Sidecheck vs. overcheck

There is not a lot of difference in the checkrein styles if your horse isn't checked up very high. For every day pleasure driving or for the Country Pleasure classes, the horse shouldn't have a lot of contact with the check for him/her to really feel it and for it to have any adverse effect on how the horse carries his head.

Now, when you get in the classes where your check is rather tight, the style of check may affect the horse.

Consider the placement of the checks:

The side check attaches to the bit below the cheeckpiece, and runs up to the ear. When the horse hits the check, there is a direct pull into the horse's mouth, the bit will pull towards the molars if that makes sense. The horse's nose will freely be able to swing at the throat pivot if that makes any sense.

The over check runs between the ears and down the face and attaches to the bit above the cheeck piece. When the horse hits the bit, there is a slight pull UPWARD in the horse's mouth, not towards the molars quite as much but more towards the roof of the mouth. The horse thusly will be a little less inclined to swing it's nose towards it's chest, unlike the sidecheck which allows for freeer movement.

That said, you will have to consider the individual horse and how it carries it's head and neck, and how it's headset is.

I like the sidecheck for most horses, particularly green ones. It does not impede their headset as their nose is free to swing whereever it likes. It is a fairly comfortable check as horses don't get their heads wrenched up as high with a side check. It helps horses learn to "tuck" their heads because the overcheck sort of works against that. And "just for looks' sake" the sidechecks tend to "look prettier" because you don't have all the leather straps all over their face smile.gif

However, some horses go better in an overcheck. The overcheck helps pull the head up higher than the sidecheck if you are looking to check your horse up very high (as long as the horse is properly built with a high enough neckset!). Some horses tend to get behind the bit (they tuck their nose in too much and the nose goes towards the chest) and an overcheck is more ideal for that situation. You will see overchecks a lot in the draft horse breed, where picking the head up HIGH is more of a priority than setting the head, and in breeds that are BRED to drive like hackneys, where they are BRED to have a super high neckset and an extreme headset where an overcheck doesn't impede the headset due to the horses' natural conformation.

I actually think that conformation plays a big part in check selection, because how they carry their head naturally will depend on how the check will aid or hinder what you are working for.

So there you go, I don't know if that helps you any. It's a minor selection, but you may find a horse goes better in one than another. I have a friend who drove in an overcheck and fought a bit with the horse... they switched to a sidecheck and the horse went happy as a clam.

Those are just some of my opinions that you may want to consider. I'm sure there's more I haven't thought of , I am interested to see what others have to say.

ADDED NOW: It was brought up later in the post to additionally check the show rules for the classes/registry you are showing. Some driving classes require NO checks. In the Shetland Pony classes it specifices which checkrein to use, for instance I think it's overchecks only on the Modern Roadster ponies.

Andrea
 

hobbyhorse23

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2004
Messages
7,805
Reaction score
35
Location
Lakeport, CA
JourneysEnd said:
Side checks are allowed but not required at ADS functions.
Or to rephrase a little more accurately, side checks are allowed but strongly discouraged at ADS events. The only people who use them are junior drivers or someone with weak arms/hands and a determined grazer.

Pinto28 said:
The original invention named a Check, wasnt to keep a horses head set. It was so the horse didnt reach his neck and get hooked on the cart. Probabally the shafts?. Just some food for thought!
Close Alex!
Sidechecks were used to keep horses from getting their bits caught on the team pole or shaft tips. Old-fashioned driving bits had slobber bars at the bottom of the shanks like some Western bits do and if the horse got those caught they'd not only yank their mouths something terrible but could panic and run off. I've never really understood how a check is supposed to prevent that but I suppose with a high-headed coaching horse and down-turned gig shafts it would be a bit more effective than with a mini whose head is level with and a foot away from the same shaft or team pole.


Side checks are less intrusive than overchecks so they are preferred for general driving if you're going to use a check at all. Overchecks keep an active, forward, up-in-the-bridle show horse from overbending or avoiding the bit in their excitement.

Leia
 

fourhorses

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 8, 2003
Messages
190
Reaction score
0
I'm just now finding a dvd (Foundation Training for the Harnes Horse by a gal named Patty Cloke. I bought at EA a couple years ago and plan to get the other 2 of the set this weekend if Star Lake has them! I'm going to pop it in tonight but I hopped on her website and on this page http://clokestables.com/amatuer.html I find country pleasure more my style and hope my horse agrees!
 

Latest posts

Top